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  1. #301
    Registered Users ScreaminMeanie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Illinois Boy View Post
    No offense, but it was assumed you would let the throttle go to idle for the auto-downshift. Glad you finally discovered that. The Spyder can be sensitive to conflicting inputs; such as holding a throttle on while braking. The Nanny will eventually shut down the system if it is repeated enough times or for long enough.

    Ride often, safe, and aware!
    No offense taken. I'm just curious as to who assumed that? The manufacturer? Since the "absolute zero" throttle is not a requirement for any other vehicle on the road (2- or 4-wheeled), why would they assume that a brand new Spyder rider would just know? For those of us who are.....shall we say, "active"....drivers/riders, maintaining a little throttle while downshifting is as much a safety measure as it is a performance measure. On any other vehicle, aside from possibly being a little less fuel efficient, there is no downside to having a few extra revs at your disposal should you find yourself in an emergency situation and suddenly have the need to accelerate.

  2. #302
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScreaminMeanie View Post
    No offense taken. I'm just curious as to who assumed that? The manufacturer? Since the "absolute zero" throttle is not a requirement for any other vehicle on the road (2- or 4-wheeled), why would they assume that a brand new Spyder rider would just know? For those of us who are.....shall we say, "active"....drivers/riders, maintaining a little throttle while downshifting is as much a safety measure as it is a performance measure. On any other vehicle, aside from possibly being a little less fuel efficient, there is no downside to having a few extra revs at your disposal should you find yourself in an emergency situation and suddenly have the need to accelerate.
    I haven't heard others having the problem you speak of. This is the first I have heard of it. Most people reduce their throttle some on vehicles when manually downshifting; which is all that was meant by the comment.

    I honestly cannot remember if I put the throttle to zero on the Spyder before downshifting or not. I will check. It seems sometimes you just do things without thought, so I will have to check. Glad you discovered your problem though. I do not disagree about manually downshifting though with regard to having some power at the throttle if needed. Many accidents occur at or near stopping points or places where speed is reduced. Being able to get out of the situation in a hurry can make the difference. My biggest fear for Spyder riders is when someone doesn't take the potential dangers seriously enough. The same for any vehicle.
    Last edited by Illinois Boy; 07-02-2015 at 08:10 PM.

    SL #7026
    VBA #652
    HOG #3935417
    2011 Viper-Red Spyder RT SE5 & Trailer
    2017 HD Ultra Limited
    Former Rides: 2014 HD Ultra Limited; '04 Kawa Nomad; '09 HD Ultra-Classic; and many Hondas through the years.
    Spyder Newbies Do's & Do Not's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Spyder-owners

  3. #303
    Registered Users ScreaminMeanie's Avatar
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    Right, when manually downshifting (even on the semi-automatic), you don't have to go to full off on the throttle. Never experienced a problem when downshifting manually, only when letting it downshift automatically for me. Like I said, the more speed/revs you are carrying when you initiate the full stop, the more likely it is that the auto-downshift will not downshift if the throttle is even slightly cracked open.

    Also, around here there are a lot of highway speed roads with traffic signals at 1-mile intervals. It's common to be zipping along at 55-60 mph and need to make a sudden stop because one of those signals goes to yellow (and we seem to have very short yellow cycles here). I think the frequency of events like those is why I was able to finally make the connection. Of course, I always let off on the throttle when stopping; it's just that last 1/32" of engagement that I never knew was critical to allowing the nanny to property operate in the auto-downshift mode until enough repetition of ending up at a full stop in something higher than first gear caused me to have the light bulb come on. Combine that with the leaning-forward position on the RS and the fact that I had to reach pretty far forward for the bars, and you can see that without completely letting go of the right bar and throttle sleeve, there is good opportunity for leaving it just the tiniest bit engaged.

    I rode two wheels for many years before switching to the Spyder, and I have never been a particularly sedate rider/driver. The RS, with its sporty configuration, is very conducive to non-sedate riding. I wonder if I will become any more sedate once I get my RT.

  4. #304
    Registered Users ScreaminMeanie's Avatar
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    Aaaand, I just answered my own question. No, I will not be any more sedate.

    I really appreciate the OP, particularly the part about not letting off the throttle to UPshift. I had always done that on my RS, but I tried *not* letting off while riding around today, and it does make a HUGE difference in how smooth the shifts are.


  5. #305
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    Thank you for the OP. My 2012 RS-S was (and still is) my first experience outside of a car...

    ...and I just learned that I have been shifting wrong since day 1. Better later then never.

  6. #306
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    Default Maybe I can't read afterall

    First and foremost let me say thank you for this information Illinois Boy. I read this before I even purchased my Spyder, and it helped me more than I can say. Heck, I even knew more about the bike than the guy I bought it off of. Nonetheless, I had read it two more times after I purchased my bike and for some reason (probably not thinking it applied to me) I did not remember anything about the battery. So after two trips where I got lost I decide to get a battery tender so I could power my GPS and phone. So me, being the genius that I am, decided that it wasn't rocket science, and I could hook this up with ease. I connected the positive first, and then I went to the negative terminal and started loosening the bolt, but it wouldn't come out, and it wouldn't go back in. It just kept spinning. I figured that the idiots at the shop must have messed it up and left the last guy with the problem since he told me they changed his battery. So I head to Lowes, and I get a nice little drill bit to extract the bolt so I can put a new one on. Well, I drilled and drilled but it barely made a hole, and it still wasn't coming out so I got scared that I would really mess something up so I said bump it, I will just wait until I can take it to the shop and let them figure it out. So last night I couldn't sleep at 2 a.m. so I, of course, come to spyderlovers.com and decide to read over this forum one more time just to gain more knowledge. As I get to the battery part, I see where you said never to hook anything up to the negative terminal or loosen it. My first thought was "oh spit(with an "h" and not the "p"). Then I click on the link and read the woes of others that had this problem and I was like "really". Well, my further reading helped me to actually install the battery tender that has been hanging on the positive terminal for the last 3 weeks, in about 10 mins this afternoon. So in the end I learned a valuable lesson. I will not only read my owners manual like you said (which I did) but I am also going to come here and research whatever I am doing just in case. Thanks again.
    Nick

  7. #307
    Active Member JCWeatherman's Avatar
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    Default Thanks for a Great Post

    I looked at Spyders 3 years before taking the plunge. When I saw the new ST in 2013, I knew that was what I would own someday. It was a bit pricey for me, but I figured that some day it would happen.

    This summer (2015), my wife and I decided it was time. I found a 2013 ST Limited for sale, and we decided to take a look at it. I test drove it and fell in love. Truth be told, I had no idea how to ride it. I had watched a video that showed how to start it, but after that, it was all new to me. The owner was very patient, but he really didn't tell me a whole lot. Unfortunately, we were not able to buy that Spyder because of a problem with the title.

    With this little experience, I went home and read this post. I was found out the mistakes that I made. The next day I purchased a used 2013 ST Limited at Hollinger's Sport and Turf in Ephrata, PA. I started asking questions based on what I read in this post, and the sales man decided I should talk to Josh, the mechanic. Josh spend about 45 minutes taking us through all of the ST's features (even how to use the radio presets). We discussed shift points and running characteristics. He confirmed much of that this post says.

    As a new Spyder owner, I have referred back to this post a few times. It is very helpful. Thanks for taking the time to write the post

    Thanks,
    John

  8. #308
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    Default Much Appreciation...

    Just read the "Do's & Do Not's" for New Spyder Owners. Thank you so much for the thread. Very informative with helpful information.

  9. #309
    Very Active Member Wildrice's Avatar
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    Default A Handy Little Tip

    The garage stall I park my F3's in has a motorcycle & riding lawn mower parked in front of it. Thus when I need to mow the lawn I need to move the Spyder out of the garage to exit the riding lawn mower. Instead of starting the Spyder I just release the parking brake & push the F3's out by hand a few feet standing on the left side of the Spyder. Well I had the front wheels turned a bit toward the down hill sloping driveway.

    I gave the Spyder a little harder push than normal & the Spyder takes off rolling down the hill with me on the left side of it. Being a motor cycle rider I grab for the handle bar brake to stop instantly reminding myself there is no hand brake. So here I go running after the Spyder when is rolling 5 mph+ & chased it to the end of the driveway before I could hop on and apply the foot brake. I'm sure I was fun to watch chasing the runaway Spyder

  10. #310
    Registered Users garyraphael's Avatar
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    At least you caught it time


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  11. #311
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    Default Thank you all

    First and foremost - a huge thanks for information on this forum. I just picked up my 2015 RT LTD yesterday afternoon. I still have a goofy grin stuck on my face after the ride home. I spent several hours reading this forum prior to my purchase. I can't thank you guys/gals enough for all of the riding tips and general machine information. As a bike rider for 45+ years I was concerned about the transition. Because of everyone's help it was almost seemless. As soon as I feel I have had enough experience to make any reasonable contributions, I will do my best to return the favor.

  12. #312
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    Default Runaway?

    Quote Originally Posted by Wildrice View Post
    . I'm sure I was fun to watch chasing the runaway Spyder
    No pic, no runaway Spyder!
    ~Sandee~

    2016 RT-L (Purchased used in February 2018)
    RT Dash Mount (from JT's Spyder Store)
    Hopnel Pouch
    Magic Mirrors
    SpyderpopsFoam Handgrips
    Iron Butt #35273
    Girls on Spyders #2779


  13. #313
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    Red face Thanks mate for the writeup

    Quote Originally Posted by Illinois Boy View Post
    “Do's & Do Not's” for New Spyder Owners:
    Updated July 1st, 2015

    This information is for both the 900 and 1330 series engines and will be indicated when something applies specifically to one or the other.

    There are several "things" a Spyder owner needs to know when buying and operating their Spyder to help them have a better experience, and to avoid causing complications later.

    This is a collection of "sage-advice" gathered from various resources on Spyder Lover's and other reliable sources to help you enjoy your experience with your new Spyder; and to avoid "beginner mistakes" that may cause grief later-on.

    Realize what you are buying:
    More and more new Spyder owners have not had any experience with "sport-vehicles", such as motorcycles and such. If you are new to this, then welcome to a new experience for you!

    However, you must realize a few things are going to happen that are just simply part of owning and riding sport-vehicles.


    Do not try to make your Spyder what it is not! Your Spyder is...
    Exhilarating (A Spyder gets you out of the house and car and into the outdoors, so enjoy it!)
    Windy (Do not try to hide behind your windshield.)
    Hot (You are sitting on top of a motor, so expect it to be! All new motorcycles and recreation vehicles run hotter than in the past.)
    A high revving machine (900 series engine models only.)

    Purchase your Spyder from a dealer with a good reputation:
    Endless future problems appear to stem from purchases and service from poor dealers. Do your homework on the dealer you are buying from. Check around to see if others have had good experiences with the dealer; both with the sales and service departments. If you are considering a used Spyder be sure to look at the maintenance records, and be sure it has been thoroughly inspected. Be sure the computer updates and recalls have been done. (This may not have occurred when an individual is selling one. A dealership should be able to tell if the system has been updated and all recalls completed.)

    Check on Spyderlovers.com to see what others say.

    READ THE MANUAL FRONT COVER TO THE BACK!!!
    You are excited to ride however do yourself a HUGE favor and read the manual entirely before doing so. You may be surprised what you (and possibly your dealer) may learn. Frequently questions are asked on Spyderlover.com that are answered in the manual.

    GENERAL INFORMATION:

    Learn how your Spyder works:
    You do not have to become a mechanic, but having knowledge will help you out in more ways than can be mentioned. Spyderlovers.com is a good place to learn.

    Missing vent:
    There never was a right-side vent for models up to 2014. Increasing airflow is the official reason from BRP.
    The 2014 RTS 1330 model does have vent covers on both sides, due to changes made to the cooling system.

    Toolkit:
    It is underneath your seat, unless you have an RSS or STS -- then the tool kit is in the Frunk (Front Trunk) mounted on the right side. Read your manual!


    "Humming Sound" after turning the key off:
    You will hear a humming sound for about 30-45 minutes after turning-off 2012-13 Spyders. This is normal and mentioned in the manual -- not to worry about it. Pre-2012's have some humming, but it appears not to last as long as on the '12's and '13's. (It is in your manual.) No information yet regarding the 2014 RTS model, but from information received, you will not likely hear the humming-sound.

    Locking the glove box and handlebars:
    When parked; turn the handlebars fully to the left or right (does not matter which direction), then turn the ignition-key one-quarter turn to the left (counter-clockwise) -- then pull the key directly out without turning it back to the right. (The key will have been in the 9-3 o'clock position when turned to the left.) Your glove box and handlebars are now locked. CAUTION: Avoid putting heat-sensitive items in your glove box. Also avoid over-stuffing or items that may shift and jam the glove box shut. If the glove box jams from something in it... try shaking the Spyder or moving the Spyder forward or backward to move the contents to un-jam it. Sometimes simply taking a ride can be enough to move the contents to un-jam the glove box. A better idea is simply to not overfill the glove box.


    “NANNY & CODES”; WHAT ARE THESE: (Overall, this still applies to the 1330 model. Read your manual.)
    The Spyder’s operations are controlled by a computer system, affectionately referred to as the “Nanny”. The Nanny monitors your Spyder when running for safety purposes and is extremely sensitive to anything operating out of its designed limits.
    When it senses something wrong it may affect the operation of your Spyder by applying system controls. (i.e., brakes, stability control, and etc.)
    When serious problems are detected by the “Nanny system” you will see your check-engine light (an orange dash-screen).
    When this happens, the Nanny may override your ability to operate the Spyder “normally”; or put your Spyder into the “Limp Mode”, which may not allow it to operate at all.

    LIMP-MODE:
    Limp-mode is a precautionary feature of the “Nanny-system” whereby it will only allow operation within a narrow-band of performance. It is designed to prevent further damage to the vehicle, and get you to a safe place, or to a dealer if possible. (i.e., reduced speed function). Read your manual about Limp-Mode.
    WARNING: The Limp-Mode can kick-in while riding your Spyder and slow it down suddenly and substantially (below highway speeds). Be sure to exit the road immediately to a safe location if this happens.

    ORANGE SCREEN:
    This occurs when the system discovers a potential problem. Many potential issues can cause the Orange-Screen to appear.
    Do not confuse the night-screen with the Orange Screen. The night-screen occurs when the sun begins to set or when there is little sun to be seen. When the Orange Screen is displayed the entire background will be dominantly orange in color; not outlined by orange as with some of the night-screens; and will have an "engine" icon displayed in the middle of the screen. Read further...

    CODES: Codes are generated by the "system" when a problem occurs to help technicians diagnose a potential problem. When the "orange screen" is showing, you can find out if there is a “code” generated by the computer to identify the problem. If you do not see the screen, try to reproduce the problem until you get the screen again. If you cannot reproduce the screen, you may likely be able to continue to ride, however you may want to cut your trip short if you do not know what caused the screen warning.
    To reference the problem(s) associated with the various codes you need a Maintenance & Repair Manual; which is not provided upon the purchase of a Spyder -- however, the code-number remains stored in the Spyder's system for your dealer-technician. You do not have to worry if you do not have the manual or cannot retrieve the code. Just get your Spyder to a dealer and they will find the code generated.
    If you can retrieve the code; write it down and post it on spyderlovers.com, someone will likely be able to look-up the code and its related problem. This is highly recommended, so you know what you are dealing with.
    Footnote: The "system" keeps a record in memory of the functions of your Spyder to include your speeds, rpm's and more. So, if you are abusing your Spyder, the computer's records will let your technician know.

    Code List (for printing): (provided by Ottawa-rider)
    You can find a PDF-file list of the codes and their meaning to print and carry with you when riding. Look for post #6 from member Ottawa-Rider: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...oftware-Update

    Code Reference App for Smart Phones:
    (APPS are created, and maintained by Rattigan Roger):
    Spydercodes for Android at Googleplay
    Myspyder for I-Phones at the Apple download site


    RETRIEVING CODES:


    RS: (Provided by NancysToys.)
    1. Turn Ignition key to "ON"
    2. Push the "MODE" button to display total hours screen. Start engine and run until check engine light (or other fault indication) is displayed.
    3. Press and hold "MODE" button while pushing the "High Beam Flash" button rapidly five times (within 2 seconds).
    4. The active faults will be displayed or "No Active Fault Code" will be shown.
    5. If you do not get a message, you didn't get the flash beams sequence done during the allotted time. Try again.
    6. Jot the code-number down and check the list in the manual to determine your problem. Share this with your mechanic.
    RT & ST: (RT provided by Jerbear / ST by Billybovine)
    1. Turn Ignition key to "ON" and wait for the multifunction gauge to complete its self-test.
    2. Push the "MODE" "SET" & "Turn Signal" buttons at the same time. (Push all three straight in.) If there was a code generated, you will see it on your screen. You might want to try it a couple times to make sure you pushed the three buttons at the same time.

    2014 RTS: (Provided by MRH)
    Retrieving codes on the 2014 is close to the same as other RT model years, except it works best to first hold the mode and set button, and then activate the turn signal button.

    Clarification on the P0127 and P0217 code messages: (From Steve with BRP customer care) Some have experienced the P0127 and/or P0217 codes on their Spyders so we'd like to provide additional information on what they mean. The following is the link to this thread started by Steve, from BRP Customer Care: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...P0217-messages

    RIDING TIPS (All models and years):

    JUST RELAX YOUR GRIP!!
    People's propensity is to squeeze the daylights out of the grips. This will make the Spyder skip from side-to-side causing a "jerky-ride" (lateral movement); which is the first comment heard by new riders.
    Relax your grip and you'll soon see the Spyder's ride will have a reduction in its "jerkiness".
    Relaxing typically comes naturally after riding it for several hundred miles. However; remember, a Spyder will always have some lateral movement to it; which is only part of the thrill of riding one!
    Check tire pressure if you feel there is still too much lateral movement or a lack of steering control after relaxing your grip.
    Some Spyders have alignment issues; do have it checked, or see one of the new “Laser Alignment” specialists that are sponsors on Spyderlovers.com. Others have improved their Spyder’s control with various after-market suspension, sway bars, and etc. Look for the sponsors of Spyderlovers.com for solutions to your needs.

    NOTE MOTORCYCLISTS: Motorcyclists are seemingly most affected by the lateral movement associated with the Spyder. They are just going to have to realize the Spyder is not a two-wheel vehicle and it is going to feel different. Also motorcycle riders need to "unlearn" counter-steering when riding a Spyder. It simply doesn't apply to a Spyder.

    CORNERING:
    Read the manual and follow the suggestions. Lean toward the handlebar closest to the inside of the corner. (Right-bar on right turns; left-bar on left turns.) This shifts your weight on the machine and also puts your head slightly lower to the center of gravity; causing you to have less of the lateral-pull associated with cornering with a Spyder.
    Use your knees on the sides of the seat to help secure yourself on tight-fast corners.
    Your passenger can lean some also if they wish; however they should hang onto their grab-rails in corners.
    Read the Motorcycle Safety Foundation’s guide on cornering a motorcycle. The setup they suggest prior to entering a corner applies to the Spyder.

    DO NOT RIDE THE BRAKE, or touch the brake when riding or cornering:
    Pay attention to whether you are doing this and stop-it!
    Far too many people seem to have this terribly bad-habit (with their cars and other vehicles), and the Spyder’s Nanny doesn't like it.
    The Nanny-system will begin to give you trouble eventually. So blame yourself if you ride your brakes and have problems!

    Apply brake when starting the engine:
    Too many new riders are finding themselves stranded with a Spyder that won't start; until they finally put their foot on the brake and find their Spyder starts right up.
    An SE5 Spyder requires pressure on the brake to start it unless you are in neutral.
    Many make sure it is in neutral before shutting the motor down. You don't have to do that. The SE5 Spyder will go into neutral automatically when started while applying the brake.

    Cruise Control Hint:
    When disengaging the cruise control (i.e., by tapping the brakes slightly) the Spyder makes an abrupt slow down.
    To eliminate this, slightly "roll-on" the throttle (as if slightly accelerating) before tapping the brakes. When doing so, the cruise control will disengage smoothly without any jerking motion of a slow down.
    Practice this a couple times until you see how easy it is to solve this problem.

    Do not ride on gravel roads:
    Despite the fact you are on three-wheels -- you are also "belt-driven". Rocks and belts don't mix. Try to avoid riding on gravel whenever possible, and check your belt right after doing so if you have to ride on gravel.

    Stop Light Activation:
    Spyders sometimes cannot activate stoplights controlled by sensors implanted in the road at the stop; or that have infrared sensors.
    When pulling up to a stoplight, look to see if there is a square or rectangle tar-shape on the road. If there is, pull the center of your Spyder over the top of one of the tar-strips -- preferably at the corner of the square or rectangle. This will expose as much metal of your Spyder as possible to help set-off the sensors.
    If you do not see sensor markings, look for an infrared sensor up near the lights. Typically, they are aluminum-color and look a bit like a camera pointed at the stopping location. If present, position your Spyder dead center of where it is pointing to help set it off.
    Be sure you are not too far back or forward of the area you need to be for either of these sensors -- otherwise you will not set them off.
    Where sensors do not work well, pull forward safely enough to let the vehicle behind set-off the sensors.
    Many states have laws allowing you to move through an intersection after waiting for a specific time. My state (Illinois) has such a law, and I use it any time the lights do not work. Check the laws of the states you are traveling through.

    Pay attention to how your Spyder is running:
    If your Spyder is showing even the slightest sign of not running or operating right; check to be sure you are not guilty of doing, or are not doing any of the items listed here.
    If not, then get your Spyder checked-out soon as possible or risk having problems later -- possibly while on a trip.
    Sometimes a subtle difference is an early sign of something going wrong or out of adjustment. Spyders can be sensitive machines.

    SHIFTING SUGGESTIONS:
    (The shifting-point suggestions for the 1330 and 900 series engines are explained separately.)

    Shifting the 1330 models:

    The “ECO” mode shift coach suggests shifting at the following rpm’s:
    1st to 2nd: 1,800 rpm’s
    2nd to 3rd: 1,950 rpm’s
    3rd and up: 2,200 rpm’s

    When manually shifting the 1330, it seems too many are over thinking it. If you are not using the ECO-mode, the just shift at around 2500-3000 rpm’s. That shift-point falls right at the beginning of the first-level power band, which is perfect. (Funny how that seems to work! See below.)

    1330 Engine Power Band (Dyno-Chart Data):

    1st level power band begins at approximately 2,500 — 2,700 rpm’s and remains flat until 4,000 rpm’s.
    2nd level power band begins at approximately 4,500 — 4,700 rpm’s and peaks at 5,000 rpm’s.
    After 5,000 rpm’s the power declines slightly until reaching 6,000 rpm’s; where the power rapidly declines; thus proving any increase in rpm’s above 6,000 rpm’s on the 1300 is inefficient and fruitless with regard to obtaining additional power and torque.

    What does this mean?
    It means shifting below 2,500 rpm’s can put an extra load on the machine when accelerating above a relaxed pace. While it may appear the engine has plenty of power below 2,500, it, in fact, is not producing peak performance power at that point, thus, shifting below the power band makes the engine work a bit harder. While the manual suggests shifting below 2,500 rpm’s, it is doing so with the thought the operator is accelerating at a very relaxed pace.
    Some have a misperception with regard to shifting a machine within its peak power band. It is often perceived to require harder/faster acceleration; when, in fact, that is not the case.
    It simply means you hold the machine in a gear longer before shifting. One does not have to takeoff from a dead stop like a drag racer to shift within a vehicle’s power band. Again, you simply hold it in each gear for a bit longer until the rpm’s reach the power band.
    American’s have long been known to have a preference to low-torque machines. With that often comes the tendency to want to shift to a vehicle’s highest gear as soon as possible, and leave it there… at least until the engine begins to shake and shudder. Not a good idea with any vehicle.

    Why is this important?
    Over a short period of time and mileage, there would probably be little noticeable affect or damage to a machine operated below its power band under normal, relaxed conditions; however, over a longer-term, there certainly can be a excessive wear along the machine’s drivetrain.
    In addition to seeking peak vehicle performance, expert/professional drivers & riders always operate their machines within its power band at all times for added control and handling. Consider it a safety precaution.
    Any vehicle operated outside of its peak performance band is operated with some loss of control and efficiency — varying, of course, to the degree it is operated out of its power band.
    For most owners of the 1330 engine, its lower torque seems to satisfy the inherent American “need” for an engine operating at a lower rpm.
    NOTE: There is not a “Trailer Mode” for the 1300 model.

    1330 "ECO" Shifting:(Check your manual) (Provided by PMK)
    The ECO (fuel economy mode) setting reduces fuel consumption by limiting throttle response and maximum throttle opening to maintain an optimal cruising setting.
    Activating the ECO Mode:
    Press the "MODE" button for 2-seconds while in the Main Screen.
    When activated, a green arrow will alternate with the gearbox position indicator to indicate the optimal timing to up-shift the transmission.
    NOTE: The Gearbox indicator will return when the transmission is shifted.
    De-Activating the ECO Mode:
    Press the "MODE" button for 2-seconds while in the Main Screen.
    ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: (provided by Lamonster) The throttle map changes to a more progressive acceleration; rather than a linear one. During hard acceleration there will not be an indication to shift -- the ECM understands you are accelerating and will not recommend a shift at this time. Only when the vehicle speed and acceleration have stabilized for a certain time and the ECM judges there is enough engine torque available in the next gear to keep the same speed and acceleration will an upshift indication be displayed.

    Shifting the 900 series models:


    900 Series Engine Power Band (Dyno Chart Data):
    The 900 series engine’s power band begins at approximately 4500 rpm’s (much higher than the 1330 engine). However, there is a substantial increase in the power efficiency of the engine beginning at around 5000 – 5500 rpm’s.
    There is an additional increase in the power band at around 6000 rpm’s; where it continues to climb until around 7800 rpm’s, after which the power remains flat before reducing after 8000 rpm’s.

    What does this mean and why is this important?
    It simply means the same as mentioned above regarding the 1300 engine’s power band.
    Shifting or operating a vehicle outside or below the power band provides less than stellar performance, less control, and potential wear and damage in extreme or prolonged operation.
    Please read the explanation under the 1330 engine operation.

    Cruise at higher RPM's with the 900 series engine:
    This seems to be a big hurdle for too many owners of the 900 series engine models. Europeans understand high-rev motors – Americans, not so much.
    Get over your fear of running the Spyder's Rotax engine at high rpm's. A properly maintained Rotax engine is designed to run at high rpm’s. Do not listen to anyone telling you otherwise. Far too many reliable experts are on the side of this advice.
    For proof: The RTS SE5's "Trailer Mode" (with fully loaded trailer) won't let you shift out of first-gear until you hit almost 28 MPH! BRP’s own design engineers let you know the machine can run at higher rpm’s; and force it to do so in “Trailer Mode”. Check this link also, where the owner's Spyder suffered problems by running at low rpm's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...ifting-results

    SE5 RTS 900 Series Clutch Engagement and Performance (Does not apply to the 1330 models.):
    The Spyder's SE5 clutch is considered fully engaged (stalled) when the rpm's are at 3200 (+/- 200). See the manual. Running at rpm's at or lower than this range for extended periods allows slippage of the clutch, resulting in premature wear on the clutch. (They are expensive to replace.)
    It is universal in opinion from experienced riders, the best performance is realized when keeping your Spyder's RPM's at 4300 or above no matter the gear you are in at any time (First-gear being the exception, of course). This does NOT mean to shift at 4300 rpm’s; but rather to shift at higher rpm’s so that the rpm’s drop no lower than 4300 when engaged in the next, higher gear. Shifting at 4300 rpm’s will drop the rpm’s close to the “clutch-locked” rpm of around 3500 and is far below the power-band of the engine. Not recommended.

    Engine Lugging:

    Do NOT lug your Rotax engine! Shifting at too low of rpm can easily cause lugging, and the damage related to it. Example: When accelerating quickly, or climbing a steep hill, you can cause the Spyder to “lug” unless you downshift first. Lugging is evident when you hear or feel knocking and vibrations beyond the norm, as well as having a lack of power. Lugging can be done easily in any gear between second to fifth. Downshift to avoid lugging. NOTE: The RTS-SE5's manual may confuse some on pages 71 and 76 (2011 manual) where it mentions 3,000 rpm's as the "magic-number" to shift, and not to exceed 4,000 rpm's. This references someone learning to ride the Spyder for the first time -- not necessarily the normal operating range. 3,000 rpm’s is below the clutch’s locked position; thus causing slippage (wear).

    DO NOT USE ALL THE GEARS ALL THE TIME: (All models.)
    Just because the Spyder has 5 or 6 gears does NOT mean you have to always use all of them all the time! Apparently there are far too many who assume they have to shift their Spyder up to fifth or sixth gear no matter what their speed is, and this could be a problem. Get over what ever is making you think you need to use all the gears all the time.

    For the 900 series:
    Keep the rpm’s at 4300 or higher no matter what gear you are in. If you drop below that, then downshift and remain in that gear. You do not have to use all the gears every single time you ride.
    Example: When cruising with a 5-speed 900 series around town at 39 to 49 MPH you should stay in 3rd-gear. You can cruise between 39 - 49 MPH all day in 3rd-gear. It is okay to do so. Shifting to 4th-gear in that scenario will drop the RPM's below the 4300 range; which strains the Spyder's ability to perform at its best power-range and diminishes the performance and enjoyment of your machine. If your Spyder feels “mushy” at the throttle, then downshift – and below 4300 rpm’s it will feel mushy.

    SHIFTING-POINT SUGGESTIONS for an RTS-SE5:
    1st to 2nd gear: Shift between 22 MPH and 29+ MPH - no sooner!
    2nd to 3rd gear: Shift at 5100+ rpm's (39 MPH) Up-shifting to 3rd gear drops the rpm’s to 4,300 -- exactly the rpm's you want to stay above.
    3rd to 4th gear: Shift again at 5100+ rpm's (49 MPH)
    4th to 5th gear: Shift to 5th only when you reach 65 MPH on level terrain. Upshift and downshifting in 5th is expected on hilly terrain to keep the rpm’s up.

    You can ride ALL-DAY in 4th-gear between 49 MPH up to and including 65 MPH without ever using 5th gear. On some rides you may never use 5th gear -- period. (Some run at much higher rpm's than that.) NOTE: Cruising in 4th gear between 63-65 MPH will have the rpm's in the mid 5,000 rpm range -- which begins to put the engine in its better performance-range (more power) which is what you want for power and control. NOTE: You will find your Spyder will run quieter, smoother and still have power at the throttle in that rpm range, and the dreaded "belt-vibration" might not be a problem when you finally get used to the above suggestions.

    DO NOT ROLL-OFF THE THROTTLE when shifting an SE5 and SE6:
    The manual states you do not have to roll-off the throttle when shifting with the SE5/SE6 system, and it is suggested you do not.
    Hold the throttle steady (do not accelerate or decelerate) when hitting the paddle-shifter at the above recommended shift-points, and you will find your Spyder SE5/SE6 shifts very smoothly when doing so. Try it... eventually, you'll become very good at shifting.

    DO NOT hold the SE5 and SE6 shift-paddle too long:
    A few have had problems when resting their fingers “heavy” on the paddle-shifter; which apparently can confuse the Spyder's Nanny regarding what your intentions are. Hold the paddle-shifter only long enough to shift gears.

    Downshifting with the SE5 and SE6:
    There is a lot conversation about this subject. The SE5 will automatically downshift for you, so you are not required to downshift if you do not want to. However, advanced & professional riders recommend getting in the habit of manually downshifting at all times to help maintain full rider-control of their machine at any moment (by maintaining power and torque-control at an optimal configuration).
    In rare occurrences after a fast/sudden full stop, some found their Spyder may not downshift into first-gear if they did not manually downshift. There is no quick resolution... you just have to repeatedly try to get into first again. Rev the engine, try reverse, try anything... eventually it should shift, while drivers honk at you for not moving!

    Big V-Twin Riders and the 900 Series Rotax Engine:
    Big V-twin riders are often too accustomed to their engine lugging along at 2,100 to 3,500 RPM's, and expect a 900 series Spyder to do the same. Doing so is a killer for the 900 series Spyder engine.

    Gas Mileage at Higher RPM's:
    Any engine’s "power to fuel-efficiency" will be found within its power band. This principle holds true for all engines within their power band.
    The 900 series engines are not champions of fuel mileage; so expect to stop more often for fuel. Start looking at around 120 miles.
    Fuel mileage is considerably better on the 1330 models. Many are seeing nearly 35-40 mpg, depending on the conditions and load.

    IN CONCLUSION OF SHIFTING SUGGESTIONS:
    Simply believe what you just read above about shifting and engine performance for the model you own and do it. You will discover an entirely different, more enjoyable experience when you finally do so.

    MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS TO CHECK OR DO:

    Tire Pressure and Shock-Setting:
    Both make a big difference in how the Spyder handles. Tire pressure and shock setting depends on your load-weight, and type of riding. Check these settings often -- and remember no vehicle operates at its best when over-weighted! Sorry... but that is just how it is.
    Tire pressure suggestions: Pre-2013 RTS: 18 pounds in the front tires and 28 pounds in the back tire. (The RT-S SE5 2011 manual recommends 15-17 pounds for the front tire; and 28-30 for the rear tire.)
    2013 models: 15-16 psi in the front-tire (as per NancysToys).
    1330 suggestions: (Updates to come.)
    Front shock settings (for adjustable shocks): For the front (manually adjusted) shock, use 4 or 5.
    Seems the stiffer the better for most, especially if you are “loading” the Spyder (check the manual for load limits).
    Don't forget the RTS has a rear air-shock that can also be adjusted to your liking. (READ THE MANUAL)

    Check your battery cables, fuses, and such often:
    Anytime these get loose from vibration the Spyder's Nanny will "speak to you". These, seemingly "small", issues are often found to be the root of many owners' problem-posts. Do let yourself be a victim of forgetting these simple inspection points.

    Check your windshield brackets often:
    They have been known to fail occasionally. The consensus is if you run with your shield "full-down" most of the time, it will cause undue stress on the middle bracket, which raises and lowers the shield. Move the shield up slightly off the metal-stop to avoid the potential damage. Keep in mind you cannot replace just the bracket. The entire lift-mechanism has to be replaced to the tune of around $600.

    Battery Tenders:
    "Tenders" help prolong a battery's life by “conditioning” it, while keeping it charged. (Short-rides may not always sufficiently charge your battery.)
    Make sure you get a battery-tender -- NOT a regular charger for this purpose. There is a difference!
    Tenders are particularly valuable if you store your Spyder for longer periods of time (typically more than a few weeks without riding); or if your battery is older.
    IMPORTANT NOTE (Pre-2013's): When permanently attaching the pigtail cables for your tender; NEVER loosen the negative jumper terminal connection (found under the seat when you open it); or use it to ground any accessory! You need to connect the battery-tender pigtails to the actual battery terminal posts found only by removing some of the panels. This issue has been well publicized on spyderlovers.com. The following thread is one you can start with regarding this: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-FRIGGIN-IDIOT It is troublesome to remove the Tupperware to get to the actual battery terminals or other ground connections, but it is essential on the Spyder to do so.
    Starting with the 2013's, the battery is now accessible through the front trunk (“frunk”), which makes it a lot easier for get to it.

    Fluid levels (brake, oil, coolant) have to be correct (All models):
    Check the fluids as you add miles and top-them-off; otherwise risk having problems with your Spyder (sometimes fairly major).
    Low brake fluid: Can cause your Spyder to throw a code; thus stopping your trip while you scratch your head wondering why. Brake fluid level can go down as your brake pads wear over time.
    Low Oil can cause SE5/SE6 Shifting Problems: A low oil reading; at or below the ADD mark, on the dipstick has been known to cause shifting problems. Failure to maintain a proper oil level might not only cause shifting problems, but possibly premature clutch failure. Keep your oil properly filled, as per your manual. BRP suggests checking the oil-level every 300-miles.
    Coolant levels: Check this occasionally. Leaks have been known to occur occasionally in the system. A technician, at the first opportunity, should look at any low-level indication for possible leaks.
    RTS 1330 2014 Oil Change: Here is a link to a great tutorial on an oil-change for the 2014 RTS 1330. It notes a few errors in the manual: (Provided by Texas) http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-RT-Oil-Change

    SE5/SE6 shifting problems / Cracked Vacuum Hoses:
    Cracked (dry-rotted) vacuum hoses are related to shifting problems on the SE5's. Heat seems to be the culprit.
    Have these checked regularly as part of your maintenance program and replace them if needed.
    No reports on the 2014 1330's yet; but this may remain an issue despite the improved cooling system.

    SE5/SE6 Shifting Sensor:
    The "shifting-sensor" on a few SE5's has failed causing the machine not to shift, or to shift inconsistently. There is no advance resolution for this problem. It is simply suggested you pay attention to your machine's shifting, and have it checked occasionally when at the dealer. (Again, this may also be a maintenance point for the 1330’s.)

    Unlocking a Stuck Frunk (Front trunk): (Provided by Finless)
    This is a link to a thread on Spyderlovers.com providing a video of how to get your "frunk" unstuck; as well as cautionary words about keeping it from getting stuck. Several of the posts within the thread discuss the various differences between models and model-years; however it appears this valuable piece of information would work for most. http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...runk-lid-video

    DO NOT Overfill the Gas Tank (Does not apply to 1330 models):
    This causes a few problems. When you get an inch or more below the top of the tank, stop filling it – period!
    Overfilling causes fuel to flow-over into the evap-canister or when the fuel gets hot and expands.
    This can lead to problems with gas-fumes (smell), and a potential fire hazard.
    In late 2012, early 2013, BRP sent owners of all models new gas-caps to seal better and help with the gas fume problem. However, the gas-fume smell can be persistent in some cases. See your dealer if you experience an excessive smell of fuel when riding or after. There are a few threads on the subject that you can thumb-through and share with your mechanic. http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Fix-Gas-SMell

    Security Screws on the Body Panel: DO NOT REMOVE THEM! (Provided by NancysToys)
    Any security screws on a Spyder are there for a reason...they are not to be removed.
    On an RT they hold the posts that slip into the rubber grommets that hold the body panel in place. These are angled, and indexed to hold them in the correct position.
    Remove the standard Torx screws then pull the panel out of the grommets. Be careful putting the panel back on...the grommets can be pushed through pretty easily. Wetting the grommets and post first helps.
    Do not lubricate the grommets unless you want to lose a panel...especially the oil check panel and its twin sister.

    Radio Pre-sets: (Provided by Badazzspydee)

    Apparently some manuals have not provided complete instructions on setting presets for radio stations. Here are the instructions to do so.
    1. Press “Mode” button until the “Audio icon” appears.
    2. Use the “right or left command buttons” to find the radio station you want.
    3. A long press will start the seek feature to the next available station. Continue doing performing a seek until the station you want appears.
    4. Here is the missing step. Press the “Set” button longer than one-second to enter the Tune or Setup screen. The word “Record” should appear under the numbers of the current radio station. The shop manual states that you can tune the station in increments of .2 by short pressing the left or right command buttons now.
    5. Short press the “Up” button until the “Preset number” you want appears in the box to the left side of the screen. I noticed this step is touchy when trying to get the number to stay in the box!
    6. Immediately press and hold the “down button”.
    7. Once the preset takes, the screen will exit the Tune or Setup screen and returns to the initial Audio screen.
    8. Repeat steps 2 through 5 for the next preset. Note that doing a short press of the left or right command buttons will cycle through the already set presets. A long press will start the seek feature.

    Listen to the radio without having the key turned-on or engine running: (Provided by szohar)
    Immediately press and hold the MODE button for a few seconds after turning the engine off. The radio will start-up. To turn if off, just turn the Hazard Warning lights on and then off. (Provided by billybovine)

    Fuel Octane:

    This subject is not up for a long debate on this thread. Fuel octane (and what it means) is second only to discussions on oil; and there are as many opinions and misperceptions as there are people giving them -- so if you have an opinion on fuel octane -- put it on another thread PLEASE!
    Fuel octane rating does NOT indicate whether one is superior to another, as many believe. In other words, 93-octane fuel is not a superior fuel to a lower octane fuel. It is simply different and designed for a specific engine use.
    What you should know though, is manufacturers do not just “make-up” an octane recommendation out of thin air for their engines. Using a fuel of an octane rating out of the recommended range can cause: Poor performance, possibly higher fuel consumption, and engine-knocking (damage to the engine); just to name a few issues.
    Your Spyder is an expensive vehicle, so make your own decision.
    Read your owner's manual for the recommended octane-rating for your model and location (U.S. / Non-U.S.)

    Customizing your Spyder for performance, fitment, and looks:
    Too often we read where someone buys a product only to find it does not work well, is not compatible with a Spyder, and/or the customer service from the provider is not good. Custom, after-market, equipment covering just about everything imaginable for a Spyder is readily available for most model types and years from the many sponsors of Spyderlovers.com
    Do yourself a favor and avoid problems by asking other members what they use and their experience with it. It could save you a lot of grief and expense.

    Lastly… Be sure to have fun and ride often... Which probably is the #1 "MUST DO".



    Disclaimer: The "Do's & Do Not's" is provided solely for informational purposes, and from sources thought to be reliable; however no guarantee is provided or to be implied by the information provided. The information may be updated, corrected, or deleted without notice to the potential end-user at any time. The end-user of any or all of this information remains wholly liable for their actions or inactions relating to the use of this information. The information is not intended to be a complete guide to the operation of the vehicle of reference; thus the end-user must always refer to their user's manual or qualified dealer as the final authorized source. Spyderlovers.com, its founder, officers, members, affiliates, and sponsors are not liable for one's use, or lack of use, of any or all information. Any end-user application of, or reference to, this information hereby confirms the end-user's complete knowledge, understanding, and acceptance of their sole and complete liability relating to the use of the information provided.

  14. #314
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    Default New Spyder owner

    Thanks for the post, don't miss my 750 Vulcan at all.

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    Default

    Last edited by Peter Aawen; 06-03-2019 at 07:42 PM. Reason: Removed complete quote!

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    Default repair

    I do agree you need to pick a shop that has a good rep for repairs made Sometimes that means you buy from one dealer for the sales amount and use another for the repair
    So if I take my Spyder in for a check-up or repairs I don't have to use the one I purchased it from for items under warranty?

    Creatively,
    Shortcut
    Chrome Angelz member in Ross County, Ohio

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    Default So what about 6th gear on my semi-automatic?

    Quote Originally Posted by Illinois Boy View Post
    Yes....

    EDIT: Also you may find when operating at higher RPM's is you will not have the belt-vibration problem commonly heard about from Spyder owners. My first thought when reading about belt-vibrations is that these individuals are likely running at too low of RPM's most of the time for the gear they are in. Belt vibrations typically occur in the 5,000 to 5,500 RPM range. At that RPM range, the Spyder should be in 4th gear if you are cruising at that pace. Higher RPM's while in the "right" gear doesn't guarantee no vibrations; but you'll find belt vibrations are very infrequent.

    Try this advice for a while and see if your experience with your Spyder doesn't "go-up" a notch or two. I believe it will...
    So what about 6th gear on my semi-automatic? It seems that you suggest not even doing 5th gear under 65mph?

    Creatively,
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    Chrome Angelz member in Ross County, Ohio

  18. #318
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shortcut View Post
    So what about 6th gear on my semi-automatic? It seems that you suggest not even doing 5th gear under 65mph?
    If you have a 6th gear, then you have the 1300 engine; in which case you do not follow shifting and rpm instructions for the 998 engine.

    Instead, look for where shifting the 1300 instructions are. Basically, you will find you can shift at lower rpm's with the 1300.

    As far as sixth-gear, that is your final highway gear; which, of course will be at higher speeds. However, remember, you do not always need to use all of the gears all of the time. Sometimes around town you may never use 6th gear; and personally, I never use it before reaching 65 mph -- just like I don't use 6th gear on my Harley until I reach higher speeds.

    Basically, with the 1300, you should be able to feel if you are in the correct gear for you speed and acceleration. If it feels somewhat sluggish, then downshift.

    Hope this helps.

    SL #7026
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    2011 Viper-Red Spyder RT SE5 & Trailer
    2017 HD Ultra Limited
    Former Rides: 2014 HD Ultra Limited; '04 Kawa Nomad; '09 HD Ultra-Classic; and many Hondas through the years.
    Spyder Newbies Do's & Do Not's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Spyder-owners

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shortcut View Post
    So if I take my Spyder in for a check-up or repairs I don't have to use the one I purchased it from for items under warranty?
    Depends on the warranty you purchased. However, a BRP warranty is taken care of at any authorized dealer; just like it is with any just about any manufacturer.

    Personally, I buy where I get my work done. I find it to be a more "harmonious" relationship, and supports those dealers who are providing good service. Just my opinion, but you know the story about opinions.

    SL #7026
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    2017 HD Ultra Limited
    Former Rides: 2014 HD Ultra Limited; '04 Kawa Nomad; '09 HD Ultra-Classic; and many Hondas through the years.
    Spyder Newbies Do's & Do Not's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Spyder-owners

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    Default Help with shifting points

    So I just bought a 2014 spyder rs sm5 and was reading through the do's and don't for new spyder riders lots of great info but can't seem to find anything specific to the sm5 manual transmission it focuses on the semiautomatic. What speed and gear are outher riders using. Is this a high rev machine? I'm coming off a Harley vrod and the shifting points seem way diffrent. Any feed back would be grate

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    Quote Originally Posted by malecrisis View Post
    So I just bought a 2014 spyder rs sm5 and was reading through the do's and don't for new spyder riders lots of great info but can't seem to find anything specific to the sm5 manual transmission it focuses on the semiautomatic. What speed and gear are outher riders using. Is this a high rev machine? I'm coming off a Harley vrod and the shifting points seem way diffrent. Any feed back would be grate
    While this information does seem to apply only to the SE5; the shifting points and rpm's do apply for the manual shift 900 series engine and tranny.

    Coming off a Harley V-twin, you'll need to get used to running your rpm's higher than you are accustomed with your Harley. Running your model Spyder between 2500-3500 rpm's will not provide you with the power and control you need -- and besides, it is hard on the entire system. I ride an Ultra-Limited and a 998 SE5 RTS. I have become quite accustomed to running each in a different manner as they require. It just takes a few miles for you to figure it out, and you'll see.

    One other difference to note for you though is that you are able to run your manual clutch at lower rpm's without being as concerned with clutch slippage as you would have with the SE5 at lower rpm's -- however, as just stated, you do not want to run your 900 engine at low rpm's.

    Ride safe and enjoy yourself!

    SL #7026
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    2017 HD Ultra Limited
    Former Rides: 2014 HD Ultra Limited; '04 Kawa Nomad; '09 HD Ultra-Classic; and many Hondas through the years.
    Spyder Newbies Do's & Do Not's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Spyder-owners

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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by Illinois Boy View Post
    While this information does seem to apply only to the SE5; the shifting points and rpm's do apply for the manual shift 900 series engine and tranny.

    Coming off a Harley V-twin, you'll need to get used to running your rpm's higher than you are accustomed with your Harley. Running your model Spyder between 2500-3500 rpm's will not provide you with the power and control you need -- and besides, it is hard on the entire system. I ride an Ultra-Limited and a 998 SE5 RTS. I have become quite accustomed to running each in a different manner as they require. It just takes a few miles for you to figure it out, and you'll see.

    One other difference to note for you though is that you are able to run your manual clutch at lower rpm's without being as concerned with clutch slippage as you would have with the SE5 at lower rpm's -- however, as just stated, you do not want to run your 900 engine at low rpm's.

    Ride safe and enjoy yourself!

    Thanks for the feed back will give it a try gonna be hard convincing myself to ride the RPMS into the 4500 5000 range

  23. #323
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    Default

    I'd like to suggest that you add that the vacuum lines could be a problem on the manual transmission Spyders as well. My 2012 RTS was running like crap, and found both lines cracked. Put new lines in, and it runs like a top. It seems like this could be a common problem, due to the front line going right across the cylinder head!
    ---------
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoJive View Post
    I'd like to suggest that you add that the vacuum lines could be a problem on the manual transmission Spyders as well. My 2012 RTS was running like crap, and found both lines cracked. Put new lines in, and it runs like a top. It seems like this could be a common problem, due to the front line going right across the cylinder head!
    It is mentioned within the text, but is specific to SE5 & 6. I will change it to include manual shift as well.

    SE5/SE6 shifting problems / Cracked Vacuum Hoses:
    Cracked (dry-rotted) vacuum hoses are related to shifting problems on the SE5's. Heat seems to be the culprit.
    Have these checked regularly as part of your maintenance program and replace them if needed.
    No reports on the 2014 1330's yet; but this may remain an issue despite the improved cooling system.

    SL #7026
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    2011 Viper-Red Spyder RT SE5 & Trailer
    2017 HD Ultra Limited
    Former Rides: 2014 HD Ultra Limited; '04 Kawa Nomad; '09 HD Ultra-Classic; and many Hondas through the years.
    Spyder Newbies Do's & Do Not's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Spyder-owners

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    Thumbs up

    Nice, and thanks for the list. This was one of the first things I read when I got my used '08 GS. I sold it last year, and included a copy of the list with the bike to help the new owners.


    Quote Originally Posted by Illinois Boy View Post
    It is mentioned within the text, but is specific to SE5 & 6. I will change it to include manual shift as well.

    SE5/SE6 shifting problems / Cracked Vacuum Hoses:
    Cracked (dry-rotted) vacuum hoses are related to shifting problems on the SE5's. Heat seems to be the culprit.
    Have these checked regularly as part of your maintenance program and replace them if needed.
    No reports on the 2014 1330's yet; but this may remain an issue despite the improved cooling system.
    ---------
    Jive
    Beckley, WV
    2012 Pure Magnesium Metallic Spyder RTS SM5, SpyderPops Belt Guard


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