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  1. #1
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    Default Nokian One winter tire

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/autos/news...pqZ?li=BBnb4R5

    Just read this article about the new Nokian One car tire. It's supposed to last 80k miles on a car so it should last the life of an RT/F3. Sounds like it should be pretty good in winter, too. Not sure how they can get the rubber soft enough for winter/rain AND still have this ultra high mileage rating but it might be something to look into for those of us who aren't happy with the stock Kendas.

    I don't have any history with this brand and they may not even have the correct size for our rides. Nokian makes an HT light truck tire that seems to have pretty good reviews.

  2. #2
    aka: akspyderman ARtraveler's Avatar
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    The thing to remember about winter riding. No matter how good the rear tire, it is the driving wheel. The two front tires act as snow plows and if you get in more than two or three inches of snow, you are not going anywhere. The rear will spin nicely though.

    I tried this first in Alaska. Got totally stuck in my driveway in two inches of snow. Had to get help to push it in the garage.

    Currently Owned: 2019 F3 Limited, 2020 F3 Limited, 2015 Vulcan 900 LTD

    Previously : 2008 GS-SM5 (silver), 2009 RS-SE5 (red), 2010 RT-S Premier Editon #474 (black) 2011 RT A&C SE5 (magnesium) 2014 RTS-SE6 (yellow). 7 Spyders, 12 years, 175,500 miles

    2019 F3L , Phoenix Orange

  3. #3
    Very Active Member BLUEKNIGHT911's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ARtraveler View Post
    The thing to remember about winter riding. No matter how good the rear tire, it is the driving wheel. The two front tires act as snow plows and if you get in more than two or three inches of snow, you are not going anywhere. The rear will spin nicely though.

    I tried this first in Alaska. Got totally stuck in my driveway in two inches of snow. Had to get help to push it in the garage.
    ... However I believe the OP's intention is using as the REAR tire .... I have stated in the past, a WINTER tire will SHED water better than an ALL-season or Summer tire. .... But on a light weight Spyder the DRY traction is going to suffer .... and an 80,000 mi. tire is not a good idea ( imho ) .... except for about 1 % of riders ( or less ) having a tire that might be well over TEN years old is dangerous. .... I think the Average yearly mileage for most Auto use tires is 15,000 mi. so 80,000 mi. is not a problem ..... good luck if you try it, but you will be the Genea pig ..... Mike

  4. #4
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    I was actually thinking about this on all 3 corners. I don't know anything about this tire or this company. I agree 80k miles is probably going to mean the tire will age out before it wears out although we have quite a few who put 10k miles on their bike every year. I was thinking, if it comes in at a good price AND it's sticky AND it sheds water well, it might be the next Q5.

    Again, I don't know anything about this tire. Depending on cost, I might be willing to be the guinea pig or I might have put car tires on the bike before this comes out. If Nokians claims for good traction/wet weather/durability are true, it might be something to look into.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ARtraveler View Post
    The thing to remember about winter riding. No matter how good the rear tire, it is the driving wheel. The two front tires act as snow plows and if you get in more than two or three inches of snow, you are not going anywhere. The rear will spin nicely though.

    I tried this first in Alaska. Got totally stuck in my driveway in two inches of snow. Had to get help to push it in the garage.
    I don't necessarily want to ride in the snow. If it's calling for snow, I don't go out. But, if it DOES work well in snow/ice (meaning, I think, it's a sticky tire which would do well in colder weather and stick like glue in warm weather), it would be a plus.

  6. #6
    Very Active Member RICZ's Avatar
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    I can not attest to how Nokians perform on Spyder, but I can tell you they are fantastic, in every way, on our Chrysler 300C wit da Hemi. I would buy them again.
    When wanting front car tires, I looked into Nokian first, but they are not available in that size. Darn!
    Ours is a red, black and chrome 2017 F3 Limited. Bought new in 2/2019. The avatar is my first bike back in 1952, a Simplex Servi-Cycle. Photo taken at the Barber Museum.
    2017 F3 Limited , Red, Black & Chrome

  7. #7
    Active Member EdMat's Avatar
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    Interesting tire company. Never paid any attention to them before now

    https://www.nokiantires.com/
    2019 RT Limited , Phoenix Orange

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by RICZ View Post
    I can not attest to how Nokians perform on Spyder, but I can tell you they are fantastic, in every way, on our Chrysler 300C wit da Hemi. I would buy them again.
    When wanting front car tires, I looked into Nokian first, but they are not available in that size. Darn!
    I wonder if this new tire will be available in the correct size?

    Thanks for the feedback on the Nokian tires in general.

  9. #9
    Very Active Member RICZ's Avatar
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    Nokian tires on slick ice video...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PddyzHgQufI
    Ours is a red, black and chrome 2017 F3 Limited. Bought new in 2/2019. The avatar is my first bike back in 1952, a Simplex Servi-Cycle. Photo taken at the Barber Museum.
    2017 F3 Limited , Red, Black & Chrome

  10. #10
    Very Active Member Fatcycledaddy's Avatar
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    I have used Nokian tires on my SUV a few times over the years, one was a winter tire, the others were all season.
    The all season was nothing special, but the winter tire hakkapeliitta were awesome.
    2020 RT Limited , Petrol Blue

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MONK View Post
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/autos/news...pqZ?li=BBnb4R5

    Just read this article about the new Nokian One car tire. It's supposed to last 80k miles on a car so it should last the life of an RT/F3. Sounds like it should be pretty good in winter, too. Not sure how they can get the rubber soft enough for winter/rain AND still have this ultra high mileage rating but it might be something to look into for those of us who aren't happy with the stock Kendas.

    I don't have any history with this brand and they may not even have the correct size for our rides. Nokian makes an HT light truck tire that seems to have pretty good reviews.
    A couple of things, I have used Nokian all weather tyres on a Spyder RT and on a car. They handled well, gripped well, lasted well but they suffered from tread cracking at a fairly early age. Look at the picture below and zoom in to the tread, you can see the wear indicators show still 5mm of tread left (8mm new) but there's considerable cracking of the rubber. I'm aware other users have found the same.

    Secondly, a true winter tyre does not use soft rubber, the tread grips by penetrating snow as far as possible and relies on the hardness of the rubber to do this. The treads are open so that they release snow as they rotate so that the tread is open again for when it reaches the road. A choked tyre on snow is pretty ineffective. Also the tread blocks are designed to hold ice studs and need to be strong so as not to shed them. They are also designed with a rubber compound that is pretty unsuitable for warm weather use and the tyres/wheels are expected to be removed at the end of the snow season.

    A Spyder's rear suspension gives fairly poor rear wheel traction especially on loose surfaces so it's not great on gravel or snow. Personally I think this is a contributing factor for the poor life of Spyder rear tyres, they're always trying to slip a little under acceleration... but that's a different topic...

    Anyway, here's a cracked Nokian tyre...
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Rule#2: Never argue with an idiot. He'll drag you down to his level & then beat you with experience.
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  12. #12
    Very Active Member Fatcycledaddy's Avatar
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    The rubber is different on winter tires.

    Here is some info on winter tires and a bit from the site.
    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/glob...ticle32531630/

    Although it's the treads that you notice, the most important part of a winter tire is actually its rubber compound, which is designed to stay soft in freezing temperatures. Like a gecko climbing a sheet of glass, a tire sticks to the road by conforming to minute imperfections. The soft rubber treads of a winter tire are able to splay and wrap themselves around minute protrusions on cold pavement, or even on what may appear to be perfectly smooth ice. Summer tires, which are designed to operate in warm temperatures, harden as the temperature falls. All-seasons, which must be designed for year-round use, cannot match winter tires in low temperatures.

    Premium winter tires perform better than basic models. What you're paying for is the latest in rubber technology and tread design. What you get is traction that may be up to 15 per cent better than economy-model winter tires. If you want to see the difference between different grades of winter tires, go to an ice race. "The drivers with the premium tires are all out front," says Ontario racer and winter driving instructor Ian Law. "There's no comparison."

    It's about temperature, not snow. Winter tires should be installed when you expect temperatures to fall to 7C or below. As the temperature falls, the rubber in summer and all-season tires becomes inflexible, killing traction. Watch the thermometer and use common sense, because no one will tell exactly when to put on snow tires (unless you live in Quebec, where the law dictates that your car be equipped with winter tires between Dec. 15 and March 15.)

    Winter tires should be narrower than summer models. Experts recommend that you go down one or two sizes when installing winter tires – if your car came with 215-mm-wide summer tires, for example, your winter tires should be 205 mm or 195 mm. Reducing the width of a tire increases the pressure it exerts on the surface beneath it – this helps the tire slice through snow and reduces hydroplaning.

    Winter tires are designed to move water. When a tire presses down on snow or ice, it melts the top layer, creating a thin film of water (the same phenomenon that occurs as a skate glides across a rink). If the water isn't moved away from the area in front of the tire, the car will hydroplane. This is why winter tires are covered with grooves (including tiny channels known as "sipes") that move water away to the sides, allowing the tire to stay in contact with the surface.
    2020 RT Limited , Petrol Blue

  13. #13
    Very Active Member BLUEKNIGHT911's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MONK View Post
    I don't necessarily want to ride in the snow. If it's calling for snow, I don't go out. But, if it DOES work well in snow/ice (meaning, I think, it's a sticky tire which would do well in colder weather and stick like glue in warm weather), it would be a plus.
    I see no real benefit to using a Winter Tread tire, there are some benefits - but when you consider it will also have a large number of negatives for most of the time you are using it, I think over-all you will be dis-appointed..... Annnnnnnnnnnnnd I have posted Winter use for the Q-5 tire a fewv times .... It actually has a Winter rating that id quite good considering it's an All-Season tire .... this was reported by " Consumer Reports "..... good luck .... Mike .............. I went back to look at the LINK you posted that tire is NOT a WINTER tire. It's an ALL Season tire, and from looking at the actual tread design, normal temp riding should be fine. But my comments about an 80,000 mi. tire remain the same.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by BLUEKNIGHT911 View Post
    I went back to look at the LINK you posted[/COLOR] that tire is NOT a WINTER tire. It's an ALL Season tire, and from looking at the actual tread design, normal temp riding should be fine. But my comments about an 80,000 mi. tire remain the same.
    You are absolutely correct. I apologize. This new Nokian tire is an ALL SEASON tire, as Mike said.

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