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Thread: Tire DOT's ?

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    Default Tire DOT's ?

    Peter mentioned this in another thread but I think it deserves it's own for discussion.
    "usually it's just a matter of aligning the red or yellow dots as appropriate when the tire is fitted!"
    I always thought that it was important to do the Yellow dot in line with the valve stem for good balance. The red dot I don't know what it means. They (tire dealers) are convincing me I'm old fashioned that doesn't make any difference any more. Peter what do you know on the DOT'S?

    Didn't know 7 was that big.
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    Very Active Member BLUEKNIGHT911's Avatar
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    If it " Doesn't make any difference anymore " ….. then why do the Manufacturer's bother to test them and put them on ?????. Over the course of my life ( 72 yrs. ) I have learned to be suspicious of most Sales people. Personally I have always used the DOT marking system ….. with good success ….. Mike

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    Very Active Member trikermutha's Avatar
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    The red and yellow dots on the sidewalls of your new tires aid the installer in balancing the tire properly. The red dot lines up with the valve stem and marks the heaviest spot on the tire. The yellow dot indicates the lightest spot.

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    Very Active Member canamjhb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trikermutha View Post
    The red and yellow dots on the sidewalls of your new tires aid the installer in balancing the tire properly. The red dot lines up with the valve stem and marks the heaviest spot on the tire. The yellow dot indicates the lightest spot.
    Having trouble getting my mind to wrap around this. If the red dot indicates the heavest part of the tire, wouldn't you want that to be opposite the valve stem (assuming that is the heavest point in the wheel) to make balancing easier.....? Putting the two heaviest parts together seems counterproductive. Just wondering..... Jim
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    Very Active Member trikermutha's Avatar
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    Very Active Member Snowbelt Spyder's Avatar
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    Doug

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    Ozzie Ozzie Ozzie Peter Aawen's Avatar
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    ^^ That's pretty much it in a nutshell - at it's simplest, if there's only a yellow dot on the new tire, then you align it with the valve stem; but if there's a red dot (by itself or in addition to a yellow dot) then it should take precedence over the yellow and you should align it with the valve stem or marked run-out point on the rim instead.

    Yellow dots (usually, but not invariably) highlight any weight variation in the construction of a new tire; Red dots (also usually, but not invariably) highlight any Radial Force Variation inherent to the new tires' construction, or if you prefer (altho not necessarily at its simplest) they highlight any 'out of round' forces in the rolling tire that will likely generate vertical ride disturbances... And of course, you also need to remember that some tire manufacturers are contrary barstewards who sometimes do things differently just cos they can, so all this discussion hasta be subject to the 'generally usual but not necessarily always invariably' caveat! Still, good quality tires made by a well known quality tire manufacturer are usually well worth the extra dollars you pay for them over cheap tires from an unknown bargain basement/knock-off manufacturer; and a trained & skilled tire technician doing their job properly can be worth their weight in tire balancing weights!

    Regardless, if you aren't a trained tire technician with access to (high tech) balancing gear and you're mounting a 'quality brand' of new tire that's only got a yellow dot on it, then you should align the yellow dot with the valve stem; but if there's a red dot, it takes precedence and you should align the red dot with the valve stem or the marked run-out point on the rim. If there's NO dot & it's not a 'bargain basement or knock-off brand' of tire, it's usually so close to evenly balanced and round that it doesn't matter how you mount it, just so long as the rim is also balanced, round, and you mount the tire correctly and evenly onto it! (Altho a trained & skilled tire tech might do it differently!) And seriously, with a good quality tire, a little time, and a few basic tools, it's a whole lot easier than most would think to properly mount a tire onto a rim well enough for most purposes, and most good quality tires available these days usually require little if any extra balancing, especially if it's going on the rear of a Spyder!
    Last edited by Peter Aawen; 09-02-2019 at 08:46 PM.
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    Active Member seaweed's Avatar
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    Yellow dots and red dots. Now if they would mark crappy tires with WHITE DOTS we would have whitewall Kenda tires

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    Quote Originally Posted by seaweed View Post
    Yellow dots and red dots. Now if they would mark crappy tires with WHITE DOTS we would have whitewall Kenda tires
    One manufacturer has and here's how to find it....
    1. go to any new spyder and
    2. look at the sidewall of the tyre, either side will do
    3. there you'll see the universally accredited label
    4. If it says KENDA then you now know it is crap

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