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  1. #201
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    Default Where did you buy yours ?

    Where did you purchase yours and are you happy with them?



    Quote Originally Posted by Illinois Boy View Post
    Do's & Do Not's for New Spyder Owners: Updated June 1st, 2013


    There are several "things" a Spyder owner needs to know when buying and operating their Spyder to help them have a better experience, and to avoid causing complications later.
    This is a collection of "sage-advice" gathered from various resources on Spyder Lover's and other sources to help you enjoy your experience with your Spyder; and to avoid "beginner mistakes" that may cause grief later-on.
    New recommendations and suggestions will be added as they are discovered.
    This list will include suggestions for stock Spyders only.

    Purchase from a dealer with a good reputation:

    • Do your homework on the dealer you are buying from.
    • Check around to see if others have had good experiences with the dealer; both in the sales and service departments.
    • Check on Spyderlovers.com to see what others say.
    • Setting-up a new Spyder seems to be a huge problem if not done correctly by the dealer; thus increasing your odds of having a miserable experience.


    READ THE MANUAL FRONT COVER TO THE BACK!!!

    • The Spyder is fun and you are anxious to ride it; but do yourself a HUGE favor and read the manual entirely before doing so. You may be surprised what you (and possibly your dealer) may learn.


    Missing vent:

    • Too many new owners get home and think they are missing a vent on their Spyder. You are not. So far, there never was one for models up to 2013. Air-flow is the official reason from BRP.


    Toolkit:

    • It is underneath your seat, unless you have an RSS or STS -- then the tool kit is in the Frunk (Front Trunk) mounted on the right side. Read your manual!


    Learn how your Spyder works:

    • You do not have to become a mechanic, but having knowledge will help you out in more ways than can be mentioned. Spyderlovers.com is a good place to learn.


    The “Nanny” and “Codes” -- what are these?

    • The Spyder’s operations are controlled by a computer system, affectionately referred to as the “Nanny”. The Nanny monitors your Spyder when running for safety purposes and is extremely sensitive to anything operating out of its designed limits. When it senses something wrong it may affect the operation of your Spyder. When a problem is detected by the Nanny, you will see your check-engine light (an orange dash-screen).
    • When this happens, the Nanny will override your ability to operate the Spyder “normally”; or put your Spyder into the “Limp Mode”; which may not allow it to operate at all.
      • WARNING:
      • The Limp-Mode can kick-in while riding your Spyder and immediately slows it down. Be sure to exit the road immediately to a safe location if this happens.
      • At this point you can find out if there is a “code” generated; which is a code-number identifying the problem.
        • The problem(s) associated with the various codes requires a Maintenance & Repair Manual; which is not provided upon purchase of a Spyder -- however, the code-number will remain stored in the Spyder's system for your dealer-technician, so you don't have to worry if you do not have the manual. Just get your Spyder to a dealer and they will find the code generated.
        • Footnote: The "system" keeps a record in memory of the functions of your Spyder to include your speeds, RPM's and etc. So, if you are abusing your Spyder... the computer's records will let your technician know.


    • Retrieving Codes for an RS: (Provided by Nancy's Toys.)
      • Turn Ignition key to "ON".

      • Push the "MODE" button to display total hours screen.Start engine and run until check engine light (or other fault indication) is displayed.

      • Press and hold "MODE" button while pushing the "High Beam Flash" button rapidly five times (within 2 seconds).

      • The active faults will be displayed or "No Active Fault Code" will be shown.

      • If you do not get a message, you didn't get the flash beams sequence done during the allotted time. Try again.

      • Jot the code-number down and check the list in the manual to determine your problem. Share this with your mechanic.


    • Retrieving Codes for an RT & ST: (RT provided by Jerbear / ST by Billybovine)
      • ​Turn Ignition key to "ON" and wait for the multifunction gauge to complete its self-test.

      • Push the "MODE" "SET" & "Turn Signal" buttons at the same time. (Push all three straight-in.) ​​If there was a code generated, you will see it on your screen. You might want to try it a couple times to make sure you pushed the three buttons at the same time.


    Relax your grip on the handlebars:

    • People's first propensity is to squeeze the daylights out of the grips. This will make the Spyder skip from side-to-side causing a "jerky-ride" (lateral movement).
    • JUST RELAX YOUR GRIP! You'll soon see the Spyder's ride will have a reduction in its "jerkiness". Relaxing typically comes naturally after riding it for several hundred miles.
    • However; remember, a Spyder will always have some lateral movement to it; which is only part of the thrill of riding one!

    • NOTE: Motorcyclists are the ones seemingly most affected by the lateral movement associated with the Spyder. They are just going to have to realize the Spyder is not a two-wheel vehicle and it is going to feel different. Also motorcycle riders need to "un-learn" counter-steering when riding a Spyder. It simply doesn't apply to a Spyder.


    Do not "ride the brake” or touch the brake when riding or cornering:

    • Pay attention to whether you are doing this and stop-it!
    • Too many people seem to have this bad-habit, and the Spyder doesn't like it.
    • The Nanny-system will likely begin to give you trouble. So blame yourself if you ride your brake and have problems.


    SHIFTING SUGGESTIONS:


    • Shift and cruise at higher RPM's: Get over your fear of running the Spyder's Rotax engine at high RPM's. A properly maintained Rotax engine is designed to run at high RPM’s.
      • For proof; the RTS SE5's "Trailer Mode" (with fully loaded trailer) won't let you shift out of 1st gear until you hit almost 28 MPH!


    • Do Not Lug Your Engine: Lugging occurs when having the Spyder in too-high of gear at too-low of RPM's while accelerating somewhat aggressively.
      • Example: When in 4th gear doing 50 MPH and deciding to accelerate to 65 quickly. You might cause the Spyder to “lug”.
      • Lugging is evident when you hear or feel knocking and vibrations beyond the norm. Lugging can be done in any gear between 2nd to 5th. So, avoid accelerating aggressively while you are in too high of a gear while at a lower-end RPM. Downshift before doing so.
      • NOTE: The RTS-SE5's manual may confuse some on pages 71 and 76 (2011 manual) where it mentions 3,000 RPM's as the "magic-number" to shift; and not to exceed 4,000 RPM's. This references someone learning to ride the Spyder for the first time -- not necessarily the normal operating range.


    • SE5 Clutch Engagement and Performance: The Spyder's SE5 clutch is considered fully engaged (locked) when the RPM's are at 3200 (+/- 200). (see the manual).
      • Running at RPM's lower than this range for extended periods allows some slippage in the clutch, resulting in eventual early wear on the clutch.
      • Most find the best performance is realized by keeping your Spyder's RPM's at 4300 or higher -- no matter what gear you are in at any time (1st gear being the exception, of course).


    • DO NOT USE ALL 5-GEARS ALL THE TIME: Just because the Spyder has 5-gears does NOT mean you have to always use all of them all the time! Apparently many assume they have to shift their Spyder up to 5th gear no matter what their speed is, and this is a problem.
      • You DO NOT have to use all five gears every time you ride your Spyder. (Keep in mind the recommendation of keeping your RPM’s at 4300 and higher.) To keep your RPM’s at 4300 or higher you sometimes cannot up-shift to a higher gear without dropping below 4300.
      • Example: When cruising around town at 39 to 49 MPH you should not leave 3rd-gear. You should stay in 3rd-gear in that scenario. You can cruise between 39 - 49 MPH all day in 3rd-gear. It is okay to do so. Shifting to 4th-gear in that scenario will drop the RPM's below the 4300 range; which strains the Spyder's ability to perform at its best power-range and diminishes the performance and enjoyment of your machine.
      • Keep in mind the Rotax engine starts providing its power at around 5000 RPM's and up. To get the most power (torque) out of the engine at anything below 5000 RPM's is dependent on you being in the correct gear to deliver power to the wheels -- the reason to keep your RPM's at 4300 or higher no matter the gear you are in. Anything less simply delivers lack-luster power to the wheels. You will know it when you increase the throttle and your Spyder does not respond with any "pep".
      • Operating a vehicle more safely and at its peak performance requires keeping power available at the throttle at all times. If your Spyder feels "mushy" at the throttle, then downshift.


    SHIFTING-POINT SUGGESTIONS for a RTS-SE5:


    • 1st to 2nd-gear: Shift when your speed is between 22 MPH and 29+ MPH - no sooner!
    • 2nd to 3rd-gear: Shift when the RPM's are at 5,100+ (5,100 RPM's in 2nd gear is at 39 MPH. Up-shifting to 3rd gear drops the RPM’s to 4,300 -- exactly the RPM's you want to stay above.)
    • 3rd to 4th-gear: Shift when RPM's are at 5,100+ (5,100 RPM's in 3rd gear is at 49 MPH -- again, up-shifting to 4th drops the RPM’s to 4,300.)
    • 4th to 5th-gear: Shift to 5th only when you reach 65 MPH on level terrain.
      • You can ride ALL-DAY in 4th-gear between 49 MPH up to and including 65 MPH. (Some run at much higher RPM's than that.)
      • If you are cruising between 49 MPH and 65 MPH, you do not need to use 5th gear. It is okay to ride in 4th-gear in this range all day, for hours on end, and for as long as you own your Spyder. Simply resist shifting to 5th-gear in that range.
      • NOTE: Cruising in 4th gear between 63-65 MPH will have the RPM's in the mid 5,000 RPM range -- which begins to put the engine in its better performance-range (more power) which is what you want!
      • You will likely find your Spyder will run quieter, smoother, and still have power at the throttle in that RPM range, and the dreaded "belt-vibration" might not be a problem when you finally get used to the above suggestions. In a short sentence... you'll find a whole new machine if you operate it as suggested here.

    • 5th-gear: Use only when you are at a minimum of 65 MPH and on level terrain... and downshift on the hills.
      • On hilly terrain, you'll need to upshift and downshift frequently to keep the Spyder's RPM's above 4300 RPM's at minimum.
      • This is a good rule-of-thumb no matter what gear or speed you are traveling. Keep the RPM's above 4300!
      • Do not let your Spyder lug it's way uphills! You should be treated so poorly for doing so!
      • REMEMBER: When shifting to the next higher gear at 5100 RPM's the next gear will engage and drop the RPM's to 4300 -- the RPM you want to stay above.



    • Big V-Twin Riders:
      • Big V-twin riders are likely too used to their engine lugging along at 2,100 to 3,500 RPM's, and expect a Spyder to do the same. Doing so is a killer for the Spyder. The Rotax engine is NOT a typical V-Twin; thus it is best not to try to operate it as one.



    • DO NOT roll-off the throttle: With the SE5 system the manual states you do not have to roll-off the throttle when shifting.
      • Hold the throttle steady (do not accelerate or decelerate) when hitting the paddle-shifter at the above recommended shift-points, and you will likely find your Spyder SE5 shifts very smoothly when doing so. Try it... eventually, you'll become very good at shifting.



    • Do Not hold the shift-paddle too long when shifting:
      • Some have had problems when resting their fingers on the paddle-shifter; which apparently can confuse the Spyder's Nanny regarding what your intentions are. It is a good idea to get out of the habit if you are doing this before you experience problems.
      • Hold the paddle-shifter only long enough to shift gears.



    • Downshifting with the SE5: There is a lot conversation about this subject.
      • The SE5 will automatically downshift for you; so you are not required to downshift if you do not want to.
      • However, it might be noted as to why many experienced riders recommend getting in the habit of manually downshifting. Manually downshifting helps maintain rider-control of their machine at any moment (by maintaining power and torque-control at a more optimal configuration).
      • A "BUDS" update moved the SE5 downshifts up to a higher RPM from the previous, which is an improvement; however it still remains below the clutch's "stalled" (locked) RPM.
      • In addition; on rare occurrences when coming to a full-stop suddenly and fast, some have found their machine may not downshift all the way to 1st gear when not manually downshifting. When this does occur it is a "pain". No quick resolution if this happens... you just have to repeatedly try to get into first again. Rev the engine, try reverse, try anything... eventually it should shift; while drivers honk at you for not moving!



    • In conclusion of shifting-suggestions: Simply believe what you just read above about shifting and engine performance and do it. Your will discover an entirely different machine when you finally do so.


    Get a spare emergency key to unlock the trunk -- for times when you lock your keys in it: (Bob Denman)

    • Get yourself an Ilco X270 key blank, and have a locksmith cut it to match your ignition key. It won't run the bike, but it will unlock stuff... Attach it to something solid behind a body panel (The one you remove for oil changes)


    Apply brake when starting the engine: Simply get into that habit.

    • Too many new riders are finding themselves stranded with a Spyder that won't start; until they finally put their foot on the brake and find their Spyder starts right-up.
    • An SE5 Spyder requires pressure on the brake to start it unless you are in neutral. Many make sure it is in neutral before shutting the motor down. You don't have to do that. The SE5 Spyder will go into neutral automatically when started while applying the brake.


    Tire Pressure and Shock-Setting: Both makes a big difference in how the Spyder handles.

    • Tire pressure and shock setting depends on your load-weight, and type of riding, but there will be an optimal tire pressure and shock stiffness. Check these settings often -- and remember, no vehicle operates at its best when over-weighted! Sorry... but that is just how it is.
    • Front shock (manual) settings: A starting-point for the front (manually adjusted) shock setting is 4 or 5. Seems the stiffer the better for most -- especially if you are “loading” the Spyder (check the manual for load limits). Don't forget the RTS has a rear air-shock that can also be adjusted to your liking. (READ THE MANUAL)
    • Tire pressure settings: Tire pressure preference varies, but a start is 18 pounds in the front tires and 28 pounds in the back tire. (The RT-S SE5 2011 manual recommends 15-17 pounds for the front tire; and 28-30 for the rear tire.)
    • Some 2013 models have a new front-end design. No reports yet on what adjustments these may need, if any.


    Check your battery cables, fuses, and such often:

    • Anytime these get loose from vibration the Spyder's Nanny will "speak to you".


    Pay attention to how your Spyder is running:

    • If your Spyder is showing even the slightest sign of not running or operating right; check to be sure you are not guilty of doing, or are not doing any of the above.
    • If not, then get your Spyder checked-out as soon as possible or risk having problems later -- possibly while on a trip. Sometimes a subtle difference is an early-sign of something going wrong or out of adjustment. Spyders are sensitive machines.


    Check your windshield brackets often:

    • They have been known to fail occasionally. Have them replaced if you notice any small cracks.


    Battery Tenders:

    • "Tenders" help prolong a battery's life by “conditioning” it, while keeping it charged. (Short-rides may not always sufficiently charge your battery.)
    • Make sure you get a battery-tender -- NOT a regular charger for this purpose. There is a difference!

      • IMPORTANT NOTE: When attaching the pig-tails cables for your tender; NEVER loosen the negative jumper terminal connection (found under the seat when you open it); or use it to ground any accessory!
      • You need to connect the battery-tender "pig-tails" to the actual battery terminal posts found only by removing some of the panels. This issue has been well publicized on spyderlovers.com. ad-nauseum. The following thread is one you can start with regarding this: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-FRIGGIN-IDIOT
      • It is troublesome to remove the Tupperware to get to the actual battery terminals or other ground connections, but it is essential on the Spyder to do so.


    Do not ride on gravel roads:

    • Despite the fact you are on three-wheels -- you are also "belt-driven". Rocks and belts don't mix. Despite the fact the newer Spyders have belt-guards, just simply avoid doing it whenever possible, and check your belt right after doing so if you have to ride on gravel.


    Fluid levels (brake, oil, coolant) have to be correct:

    • Check these often as your Spyder will not run right if they are not.
    • As an example: Your brake fluid level will go lower as the brake-pads begin to wear due to the brake cylinder having to travel further to contact the pads to the rotors. While your brake-pads may still look good, your brake-fluid is now lower. Some say your Spyder might throw a code for it; thus stopping your trip... while you scratch your head wondering why.
    • Low oil is another problem -- known to cause shifting problems, among others. (Cracked vacuum hoses are also a problem if you have shifting problems with the SE5)
    • Simply check the fluids as you add miles and top-them-off.


    Locking the glove box and handlebars: (Shame on those that did not read the manual to know this!)

    • When parked; turn the handlebars fully to the left or right (does not matter which direction), then turn the ignition-key one-quarter turn to the left (counter-clockwise) -- then pull the key directly out without turning it back to the right. (The key will have been in the 9-3 o'clock position when turned to the left.) Your glove box and handlebars are now locked.
    • CAUTION: Be careful what you put into your glove box if it is sensitive to heat (from the engine); and if it might shift around to where it jams the glove box shut. If the glove box jams from something in it... try shaking the Spyder or moving the Spyder forward or backward to move the contents to un-jam it. Sometimes simply taking a ride can be enough to move the contents to un-jam the glove box. A better idea is simply to not overfill the glove box.


    Cruise Control Hint:

    • When disengaging the cruise-control (by tapping the brakes slightly) the Spyder makes an abrupt slow-down. Some find it to be a very "uncomfortable" feeling.
    • To eliminate this all you have to do is slightly "roll-on" the throttle (as if slightly accelerating) before tapping the brakes.
    • When doing so, the cruise control will disengage without the jerking motion of a slow-down. Practice this a couple times until you see how easy it is to solve this problem.


    Setting Radio Pre-sets: (
    Provided by "Badazzspydee") Apparently some manuals have not provided complete instructions on setting pre-sets for radio stations. Here are the instructions to do so.

    1. Press the Mode button until the Audio icon appears.

    2. Use the right or left command buttons to find the radio station you want. A long press will do a seek to the next available station. Continue doing a seek until the station you want appears.

    3. Here is the missing step. Press the Set button longer than one second to enter the Tune or Setup screen. The word Record should appear under the numbers of the current radio station. The shop manual states that you can tune the station in increments of .2 by short pressing the left or right command buttons now.

    4. Short press the Up button until the Preset number you want appears in the box to the left side of the screen. I noticed that this step can be touchy at times trying to get the number to stay in the box!

    5. Immediately press and hold the down button. Once the preset takes, the screen will exit the Tune or Setup screen and returns to the initial Audio screen.

    6. Repeat steps 2 through 5 for the next preset. Note that doing a short press of the left or right command buttons will cycle through the already set presets. A long press will start the seek.


    Do not over-fill the gas tank.


    • This causes a few problems. So, when you get an inch or more below the top of the tank, stop filling it - period.
    • Over-filling has been known to cause fuel to get into the evap-canister; which leads to problems with gas-fumes (smell), and a potential fire hazard.
    • BRP (late 2012, early 2013) sent all owners of all models new gas-caps that seal better in an effort to help with the overall problem. However, the gas-fume smell can be persistent in some cases.
    • See your dealer if you smell fuel when riding or after.
    • There are a few threads on the subject that you can thumb-through and share with your mechanic.


    FUEL OCTANE:

    • Common-sense tells me not to enter into this subject here. This subject is not up for a long debate on this thread. Fuel octane (and what it means) is second only to discussions on oil; and there are as many opinions and mis-perceptions as there are people giving them -- so if you have an opinion on fuel octane -- put it on another thread PLEASE!
    • First-off; fuel octane rating does NOT indicate whether one is superior to another; as many believe it to be. In other words, 93 octane is not a superior fuel to 83 octane. It is simply different and designed for a specific engine use.

    • What you should know though, is manufacturers do not just “make-up” an octane recommendation out of thin-air for their engines.

    Using a fuel of an octane-rating out of the recommended range can cause:

    • Poor performance, possibly higher fuel consumption, and engine-knocking (damage to the engine); just to name a few issues.
    • ​​Your Spyder is an expensive vehicle. Think about it, and make your own decision.
      Read your owner's manual for the recommended octane-rating for your model and location (U.S. / Non-U.S.)


    STOP LIGHT ACTIVATION:

    • Some new riders are not aware that their Spyder (or motorcycles) cannot activate the newer stop-lights controlled by sensors implanted in the road at the stop; or that have infra-red sensors up by the stop-lights.
    • When pulling up to a stop-light, look to see if there is a square or rectangle tar-shape on the road. If there is, pull the center of your Spyder over the top of one of the tar-strips -- preferably at the corner of the square or rectangle. This will expose as much metal of your Spyder as possible to help set-off the sensors.
    • If you do not see sensors markings; look to see if the lights have an infra-red sensor up near the lights. Typically, these are aluminum in color and look a bit like a camera pointed at the stopping location. If present, then position your Spyder dead-center of where it is pointing to help set it off.
    • Be sure you are not too far back or forward of the area you need to be in for either of these sensors -- otherwise you will not set them off. Pay attention, and stop where you are supposed to.
    • Another thing I do at lights where I know the sensors do not work well, is to pull forward safely enough to let the vehicle behind me set-off the sensors. Sometimes I have to point at the lights, then to the ground, and motion the vehicle to move forward behind me. Most all times the driver knows what I am referring to and does it -- thus helping solve the problem.
    • Lastly; many states have laws for motorcycles that allows you to move through an intersection after having waited for a specific or reasonable amount of time. My state, Illinois has such a law... and I use any time the lights do not work.
    • Check your state's law, and those states you may be traveling through, to see what it requires for you to move through the intersection when the lights do not work.


    Lastly; be sure to have fun and ride often... which probably should be the #1 "MUST DO".




    Disclaimer: The "Do's & Do Not's" is provided solely for informational purposes, and from sources thought to be reliable. The information may be updated, corrected, or deleted without notice to the potential end-user at any time. The end-user of any or all of this information remains wholly liable for their actions or inactions relating to the use of this information. The information is not intended to be a complete guide to the operation of the vehicle of reference; thus the end-user must always refer to their user's manual or qualified dealer as the final authorized source. Spyderlovers.com, its founder, officers, members, affiliates, and sponsors are not liable for one's use, or lack of use, of any or all of the information. Any end-user application of, or reference to, this information hereby confirms the end-user's complete knowledge, understanding, and acceptance of their sole and complete liability relating to the use of the information provided.


  2. #202
    Very Active Member Wiredux's Avatar
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    This is such good info and most of the time I carry my iPad around with me, I have decided to make this into a iBook for the iPad. Currently a work in progress.

    IMG_2460.jpg

  3. #203
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Thomas View Post
    Where did you purchase yours and are you happy with them?
    Sorry for the delay in answering your question.

    I bought mine at Loves Park Powersports, in Loves Park , IL. I have had all my service done there. So far, I have not had any problems. I know of one person that says he didn't like the dealer, but I have had no problem. I have talked to the tech several times and he seems level headed and consistent.

    Not sure this info is going to help you in LV though.

    SL #7026
    VBA #652
    HOG #3935417
    2011 Viper-Red Spyder RT SE5 & Trailer
    2017 HD Ultra Limited
    Former Rides: 2014 HD Ultra Limited; '04 Kawa Nomad; '09 HD Ultra-Classic; and many Hondas through the years.
    Spyder Newbies Do's & Do Not's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Spyder-owners

  4. #204
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    Quote Originally Posted by NCSpyderRT View Post
    This is such good info and most of the time I carry my iPad around with me, I have decided to make this into a iBook for the iPad. Currently a work in progress.

    IMG_2460.jpg
    i would be interested... Please keep me in the loop... This info does get updated quite regularly.
    Last edited by Illinois Boy; 06-27-2013 at 11:32 PM.

    SL #7026
    VBA #652
    HOG #3935417
    2011 Viper-Red Spyder RT SE5 & Trailer
    2017 HD Ultra Limited
    Former Rides: 2014 HD Ultra Limited; '04 Kawa Nomad; '09 HD Ultra-Classic; and many Hondas through the years.
    Spyder Newbies Do's & Do Not's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Spyder-owners

  5. #205
    Very Active Member Wiredux's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Illinois Boy View Post
    i would be interested... Please keep me in the loop... This info does get updated quite regularly.
    PM Sent

  6. #206
    Active Member wd5gnr's Avatar
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    I wish I had read this about a week ago! I am surprised this isn't stickied. Great tips -- I sat in the highway for 20 minutes with a dead engine in 1st gear and apparently didn't step on the brake! Finally figured it out, but man was that tense.

    Thanks for this list.

  7. #207
    Active Member spydermyke990's Avatar
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    When I first started ryding mine, I had a tendency to jerk sharply from side to side in hard curves. I started concentrating on making myself look farther down the road, since I had been riding atv's for a long time and was still used to scanning directly in front of me for obstacles and trail hazards. Once I started looking farther ahead. I started getting smoother through curvy roads.

  8. #208
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    Thumbs up

    great advice and thanks for taking the time to explain it


    fas

  9. #209
    Active Member wetmountainman's Avatar
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    Why is this not a "sticky"? This is great information that every new owner need to read.

  10. #210
    Very Active Member MidLifeCrisis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wetmountainman View Post
    Why is this not a "sticky"? This is great information that every new owner need to read.
    +1. Way too beneficial to be buried.

  11. #211
    Very Active Member IdahoMtnSpyder's Avatar
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    Yeah, this needs to be a "sticky"! I just now found it because of a comment in a recent thread.

    Sorry if this has already been mentioned. I didn't read all the posts. As for the negative battery terminal. It looks like that has been corrected on the 2013's with the battery up front. I removed the negative nut several times on my 2013 RT adding some connections to it with no problem of it coming loose.

  12. #212
    Very Active Member MRH's Avatar
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    Default Shifting on the 2014 RT

    BRP and the dealer both have told me the shifting on the (more highly powered) 2014's should be in the same RPMs as the previous models (4000-6000 ideal cruising RPMs, shifting not before 5000).

    Still, the Eco mode seems to prefer that my RPMs are lower, and those numbers also "feel" right when I'm riding (for what little that's worth).

    I can see that the power of the engine is more or less where it has always been, but am wondering if my shifting sensibility has reason or room to change.

    Thoughts?

  13. #213
    Registered Users Dan_Ashley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spydermyke990 View Post
    When I first started ryding mine, I had a tendency to jerk sharply from side to side in hard curves. I started concentrating on making myself look farther down the road, since I had been riding atv's for a long time and was still used to scanning directly in front of me for obstacles and trail hazards. Once I started looking farther ahead. I started getting smoother through curvy roads.
    A motorcycle safety foundation basic rider course would help with this a lot.
    Dan

    2012 Viper Red Rt
    upgrades:
    Baja Ron's Anti-Sway
    Diamond-R Arm Rests
    Gloriders
    High mount brake light
    chrome front fender garnish
    Bad Boy Horn
    Chrome Deflector Rack
    Chrome Scuff Nose Accent
    Handlebar Grip Fringe
    Gremlin Bells

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    Banged Up Member MouthPiece's Avatar
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    Has anyone mentioned getting a Rolo/Outlaw laser alignment?? If not, this is a must.

    Chris

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    Very Active Member IdahoMtnSpyder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MouthPiece View Post
    Has anyone mentioned getting a Rolo/Outlaw laser alignment?? If not, this is a must.
    If you have someone close by to do it. The nearest one to me is 400 to 500 miles away!

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    Banged Up Member MouthPiece's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WasWinger View Post
    If you have someone close by to do it. The nearest one to me is 400 to 500 miles away!
    Plan you a vacation or "two day ride" that would include a visit to a local (if that can be said) Rolo/Outlaw laser alignment distributor and have it done. Only takes about an hour of your time as far as the procedure itself.

    ​Chris

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    Quote Originally Posted by WasWinger View Post
    Yeah, this needs to be a "sticky"! I just now found it because of a comment in a recent thread.

    Sorry if this has already been mentioned. I didn't read all the posts. As for the negative battery terminal. It looks like that has been corrected on the 2013's with the battery up front. I removed the negative nut several times on my 2013 RT adding some connections to it with no problem of it coming loose.

    I inserted a note about this point, based on your suggestion. It slipped past me... sorry.

    Quote Originally Posted by MRH View Post
    BRP and the dealer both have told me the shifting on the (more highly powered) 2014's should be in the same RPMs as the previous models (4000-6000 ideal cruising RPMs, shifting not before 5000).

    Still, the Eco mode seems to prefer that my RPMs are lower, and those numbers also "feel" right when I'm riding (for what little that's worth).

    I can see that the power of the engine is more or less where it has always been, but am wondering if my shifting sensibility has reason or room to change.

    Thoughts?
    This is something I would defer to those experienced riders owning the 1330's and what their final thoughts are. I found most dealers have no clue as to how to operate the previous models within their peak-performance band. JMHO...

    It is early in the riding season this year, and many 1300 riders have only had their Spyders for a few weeks; while others have not ridden their 1330's at all.

    I am waiting for the experienced riders' opinions once they have the opportunity to put miles on their 1330 to gain enough information for suggestions on best-practices for handling them to achieve peak performance. I suspect the information will begin to roll-in sooner than later.

    From initial comments from those I listen to, the new 1330's definitely have its peak power band beginning at lower rpm's than the 990 series engine -- which to the average rider is going to feel more comfortable, in that most vehicles driven/ridden by the average person has more lower-end torque provided either by the engine or gearing (or combination of both).

    So far there is no indications the actual handling best-practices (steering and such) has changed any. So it is looking as if the only big change in operation will be the shift-points and finding the optimal rpm shift-points for the 1330's.

    Quote Originally Posted by MouthPiece View Post
    Has anyone mentioned getting a Rolo/Outlaw laser alignment?? If not, this is a must.

    Chris
    Information such as this is not what this thread is intended for. This thread was intended for basic operational tips/hints for stock Spyders -- not any customization or other such services. Other threads handle those subjects quite well on Spyderlovers.com. No offense, but if we start adding all of these additional suggestions the post will become a 300-page post; and it is getting long as it it...

    SL #7026
    VBA #652
    HOG #3935417
    2011 Viper-Red Spyder RT SE5 & Trailer
    2017 HD Ultra Limited
    Former Rides: 2014 HD Ultra Limited; '04 Kawa Nomad; '09 HD Ultra-Classic; and many Hondas through the years.
    Spyder Newbies Do's & Do Not's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Spyder-owners

  18. #218
    Banged Up Member MouthPiece's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Illinois Boy View Post
    I inserted a note about this point, based on your suggestion. It slipped past me... sorry.



    This is something I would defer to those experienced riders owning the 1330's and what their final thoughts are. I found most dealers have no clue as to how to operate the previous models within their peak-performance band. JMHO...

    It is early in the riding season this year, and many 1300 riders have only had their Spyders for a few weeks; while others have not ridden their 1330's at all.

    I am waiting for the experienced riders' opinions once they have the opportunity to put miles on their 1330 to gain enough information for suggestions on best-practices for handling them to achieve peak performance. I suspect the information will begin to roll-in sooner than later.

    From initial comments from those I listen to, the new 1330's definitely have its peak power band beginning at lower rpm's than the 990 series engine -- which to the average rider is going to feel more comfortable, in that most vehicles driven/ridden by the average person has more lower-end torque provided either by the engine or gearing (or combination of both).

    So far there is no indications the actual handling best-practices (steering and such) has changed any. So it is looking as if the only big change in operation will be the shift-points and finding the optimal rpm shift-points for the 1330's.



    Information such as this is not what this thread is intended for. This thread was intended for basic operational tips/hints for stock Spyders -- not any customization or other such services. Other threads handle those subjects quite well on Spyderlovers.com. No offense, but if we start adding all of these additional suggestions the post will become a 300-page post; and it is getting long as it it...
    SORRY I GAVE MEANING FOR WHICH THE OP DID NOT INTEND. I'LL TRY TO DO BETTER NEXT TIME.
    NO OFFENSE TAKEN. I WON'T GIVE YOU THAT POWER.
    Last edited by MouthPiece; 03-08-2014 at 01:40 PM.

  19. #219
    Registered Users Dan_Ashley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spydermedicrn View Post
    Ok, so I took my bike in for service and was told that I am riding the brake and need to stop. Well I knew better, I wasn't riding the brake. I knew better because I rode with my right foot hooked under the brake pedal. What I found myself doing was pulling up on the brake A LOT!. Well you would think that would be OK but IT IS NOT!!! ANY TOUCHING OF THE BRAKE is engaging the brake. I went through a new pair of pads in a very short time before I figured out I was the problem. Now I just use the foot pegs like I should and only touch the brake to use it. Everything is great now.
    NBV Highway peg brackets could help.
    Dan

    2012 Viper Red Rt
    upgrades:
    Baja Ron's Anti-Sway
    Diamond-R Arm Rests
    Gloriders
    High mount brake light
    chrome front fender garnish
    Bad Boy Horn
    Chrome Deflector Rack
    Chrome Scuff Nose Accent
    Handlebar Grip Fringe
    Gremlin Bells

  20. #220
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    Quote Originally Posted by MouthPiece View Post
    SORRY I GAVE MEANING FOR WHICH THE OP DID NOT INTEND. I'LL TRY TO DO BETTER NEXT TIME.
    NO OFFENSE TAKEN. I WON'T GIVE YOU THAT POWER.
    I thought you were intending for me to include the alignment suggestion to the OP; which is why I said what I did. I was not intending to offend you if I did.

    Personally, it appears the alignment IS a must-do for Spyders though, given all the good responses from those getting it done. I know I am getting mine done as soon as the weather breaks around here.

    Again, I hope I didn't offend you. That was not my intention. Sometimes I just type fast and don't think first.

    SL #7026
    VBA #652
    HOG #3935417
    2011 Viper-Red Spyder RT SE5 & Trailer
    2017 HD Ultra Limited
    Former Rides: 2014 HD Ultra Limited; '04 Kawa Nomad; '09 HD Ultra-Classic; and many Hondas through the years.
    Spyder Newbies Do's & Do Not's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Spyder-owners

  21. #221
    GOS member (Girls On Spyders) Spyder_Cowgirl's Avatar
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    Default Codes Suggestion

    Illinois Boy .... check this with RR (Roger); I believe his app is now available for direct download (free) as follows:
    • SpyderCodes for Android at the GooglePlay
    • MySpyder for iPhone at the Apple down load site


    I believe the information is posted on the listed web site, so it might be redundant to show it here -- your choice.

    Was giving this thread my periodic read (roughly twice a year) when I thought about the above.

    Thanks for putting this thread together and also for maintaining it ... good job! Best Regards ... Ann
    __________________________________________________ _
    2016 RT Limited -- "Jubilee" (as in Cherries)
    Guardian Bell (gift from spyderowboy)
    ISCI Dual Flag Mount – Tall Poles
    Lamonster Bottle Holder and Spyder Cuff
    Spyderpops Missing Belt Guard
    Spyderpops Bumpskid
    Spyderpops Rear Run / Brake / Turn LEDs
    Spyderpops Mirror LEDs
    Custom Dynamics HMT Brake

    Spyderpops Keep Out The Trash (KOTT) Grills
    Don't Eat Mud / mudflap
    __________________________________________________ __

  22. #222
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spyder_Cowgirl View Post
    Illinois Boy .... check this with RR (Roger); I believe his app is now available for direct download (free) as follows:
    • SpyderCodes for Android at the GooglePlay
    • MySpyder for iPhone at the Apple down load site


    I believe the information is posted on the listed web site, so it might be redundant to show it here -- your choice.

    Was giving this thread my periodic read (roughly twice a year) when I thought about the above.

    Thanks for putting this thread together and also for maintaining it ... good job! Best Regards ... Ann
    Thanks Ann. I will update the info...

    SL #7026
    VBA #652
    HOG #3935417
    2011 Viper-Red Spyder RT SE5 & Trailer
    2017 HD Ultra Limited
    Former Rides: 2014 HD Ultra Limited; '04 Kawa Nomad; '09 HD Ultra-Classic; and many Hondas through the years.
    Spyder Newbies Do's & Do Not's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Spyder-owners

  23. #223
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    Default SPYDERS TO THE RESCUE link

    Quote Originally Posted by Cruzr Joe View Post
    When you get time, go to the Home Page and on the right hand side is a "SPYDERS TO THE RESCUE" link, read it and if you can, join it. Print it out just before a trip out of your comfort zone.

    Cruzr Joe

    Newbie Here (1 week)…Thanks for the “heads up” on the link to "SPYDERS TO THE RESCUE". My husband puts on a lot of miles traveling to speaking engagements (did on two wheels, before his accident, no doubt he will on three).
    Last edited by LadyBogo; 04-26-2014 at 10:37 AM.

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    Default Note for newbies

    recently found a great way to teach a hard headed newbie 1)have them wear good earplugs to cut down on motor noise.2) put the spyder in trailer mode so the person cannot shift to early hope this helps any new riders trying to break the low RPM habits
    Quote Originally Posted by Illinois Boy View Post
    Do's & Do Not's for New Spyder Owners: Updated May 21st, 2014

    This information is for the 900 series engine and the new 2014 RTS 1330.

    It is indicated where information is specific to one or the other (typically in red for the 1330).

    When not indicated; the information applies to both. (i.e., handling, Nanny, and more). More updates will be added directly related to the new 2014 RTS 1330 engine when we begin to get more reports back from owners.


    The initial feedback for the new 1330's is the shift-points are definitely at lower rpm's than on the 900 series engine (2,500-3,000 rpm's for the 1330's); so operate your machine accordingly.

    The two motors are almost exact opposites, in that the 1330 has lower-end torque not requiring the higher rpm's of the 900 series engine to be within the optimum power band. Heat issues also seem to be improved on the new 1330's versus previous incarnations of the Spyder.

    If any 1330 owners send me a PM on any operation suggestions or pointers, I will be more than happy to include them in this thread. Happy riding to all! ... from Illinois Boy


    There are several "things" a Spyder owner needs to know when buying and operating their Spyder to help them have a better experience, and to avoid causing complications later. This is a collection of "sage-advice" gathered from various resources on Spyder Lover's and other sources to help you enjoy your experience with your Spyder; and to avoid "beginner mistakes" that may cause grief later-on. New recommendations and suggestions will be added as they are discovered. This list will include suggestions for stock Spyders only.
    Information on the new 2014 RTS model (with the new 1330 3-cylinder engine) will be added as we learn more from riders' experience.


    Realize what you are buying:
    It appears more and more new Spyder owners have not had any experience with "sport-vehicles", such as motorcycles and such. If you are new to this, then welcome to a new experience for you!
    However, you must realize a few things are going to happen that are just simply part of owning and riding sport-vehicles.
    Do not try to make your Spyder what it is not!
    Your Spyder is...

    • Exhilarating (A Spyder gets you out of the house (and car) and into the outdoors, so enjoy it!)
    • Windy (Do not try to hide behind your windshield or try to buy a barn door windshield.)
    • Hot (you are sitting on top of a motor, so expect it to be! All new motorcycles and recreation vehicles run hotter than in the past.)
    • A high revving machine (900 series engine models. Read more below on how to operate it.)

    Purchase your Spyder from a dealer with a good reputation:
    Endless future problems appear to stem from purchases and services from poor dealers. Do your homework on the dealer you are buying from. Check around to see if others have had good experiences with the dealer; both with the sales and service departments. Check on Spyderlovers.com to see what others say.

    READ THE MANUAL FRONT COVER TO THE BACK!!!
    You are excited to ride; but do yourself a HUGE favor and read the manual entirely before doing so. You may be surprised what you (and possibly your dealer) may learn.

    Learn how your Spyder works:

    You do not have to become a mechanic, but having knowledge will help you out in more ways than can be mentioned. Spyderlovers.com is a good place to learn.

    Missing vent:

    Too many new owners get home and think they are missing a vent on their Spyder. You are not. So far, there never was one for models up to 2013. Air-flow is the official reason from BRP.
    The 2014 RTS model (with the new 1330 inline 3-cylinder engine) has vent covers on both sides, due to changes made to the cooling system.


    Toolkit:

    It is underneath your seat, unless you have an RSS or STS -- then the tool kit is in the Frunk (Front Trunk) mounted on the right side. Read your manual!

    "Humming Sound" after turning the key off:
    You will hear a humming sound for about 30-45 minutes after turning-off 2012-13 Spyders. This is normal and mentioned in the manual -- not to worry about it. Pre-2012's have some humming, but it appears not to last as long as on the '12's and '13's. (It is in your manual.) No information yet regarding the 2014 RTS model, but from information received, you will not likely hear the humming-sound.

    “NANNY & CODES”; WHAT ARE THESE: (Overall, this still applies to the 1330 model.)
    The Spyder’s operations are controlled by a computer system, affectionately referred to as the “Nanny”. The Nanny monitors your Spyder when running for safety purposes and is extremely sensitive to anything operating out of its designed limits.
    When it senses something wrong it may affect the operation of your Spyder by applying system controls (i.e., brakes, stability control, and etc).
    When a somewhat more serious problem is detected by the Nanny, you will see your check-engine light (an orange dash-screen). When this happens, the Nanny may override your ability to operate the Spyder “normally”; or put your Spyder into the “Limp Mode”; which may not allow it to operate at all.

    Limp-Mode:
    Will put your Spyder in a mode whereby it will only operate within a narrow-band of performance -- designed to at least get you to a safe place, or to a dealer (i.e., reduced speed function). Read your manual about Limp-Mode.
    WARNING: The Limp-Mode can kick-in while riding your Spyder and slow it down suddenly and quite substantially (below highway speeds). Be sure to exit the road immediately to a safe location if this happens.

    Orange-Screen:
    This occurs when the system discovers a potential problem. Many potential issues can cause the Orange-Screen to appear. Read further...

    CODES:
    Are generated by the "system" to help technicians diagnose a potential problem. When the "orange screen" is showing, you can find out if there is a “code” generated by the computer to identify the problem. If you do not see the screen, try to reproduce the problem until you get the screen again. If you cannot reproduce the screen, you may likely be able to continue to ride, however you may want to cut your trip short if you do not know what caused the screen warning.

    • To reference the problem(s) associated with the various codes you need a Maintenance & Repair Manual; which is not provided upon the purchase of a Spyder -- however, the code-number will remain stored in the Spyder's system for your dealer-technician, so you don't have to worry if you do not have the manual. Just get your Spyder to a dealer and they will find the code generated.
    • If you write down the code and post it on spyderlovers.com, someone will likely be able to look-up the code and its related problem. This is highly recommended, so you know what you are dealing with.
    • Footnote: The "system" keeps a record in memory of the functions of your Spyder to include your speeds, rpm's and more. So, if you are abusing your Spyder, the computer's records will let your technician know.

    Code List (for printing): (provided by ottawa-rider): You can find a pdf-file of a list of the codes and their meaning to print and carry with you when riding on this link. Look for post #6 from member Ottawa-Rider: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...oftware-Update

    Retrieving Codes for an RS: (Provided by Nancy's Toys.)

    • Turn Ignition key to "ON"
    • Push the "MODE" button to display total hours screen. Start engine and run until check engine light (or other fault indication) is displayed.
    • Press and hold "MODE" button while pushing the "High Beam Flash" button rapidly five times (within 2 seconds).
    • The active faults will be displayed or "No Active Fault Code" will be shown.
    • If you do not get a message, you didn't get the flash beams sequence done during the allotted time. Try again.
    • Jot the code-number down and check the list in the manual to determine your problem. Share this with your mechanic.

    Retrieving Codes for an RT & ST: (RT provided by Jerbear / ST by Billybovine)

    • Turn Ignition key to "ON" and wait for the multifunction gauge to complete its self-test.
    • Push the "MODE" "SET" & "Turn Signal" buttons at the same time. (Push all three straight-in.) If there was a code generated, you will see it on your screen. You might want to try it a couple times to make sure you pushed the three buttons at the same time.

    Retrieving Codes for the new 2014 RTS: (Provided by MRH)

    • Retrieving codes on the 2014 is close to the same as other RT model years, except it works best to first hold the mode and set button, and then activate the turn signal button.

    Code Reference App for Smart Phones: (APPS are created, and maintained by Rattigan Roger):

    • Spydercodes for Android at Googleplay
    • Myspyder for I-Phones at the Apple download site

    Clarification on the P0127 and P0217 code messages : (From Steve with BRP customer care) Some have experienced the P0127 and/or P0217 codes on their Spyders so we'd like to provide additional information on what they mean.
    The following is the link to this thread started by Steve, from BRP Customer Care: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...P0217-messages

    RIDING TIPS (All models and years):

    JUST RELAX YOUR GRIP!!

    People's propensity is to squeeze the daylights out of the grips. This will make the Spyder skip from side-to-side causing a "jerky-ride" (lateral movement).
    Relax your grip and you'll soon see the Spyder's ride will have a reduction in its "jerkiness". Relaxing typically comes naturally after riding it for several hundred miles. However; remember, a Spyder will always have some lateral movement to it; which is only part of the thrill of riding one!

    • NOTE: Motorcyclists are seemingly most affected by the lateral movement associated with the Spyder. They are just going to have to realize the Spyder is not a two-wheel vehicle and it is going to feel different. Also motorcycle riders need to "unlearn" counter-steering when riding a Spyder. It simply doesn't apply to a Spyder.

    CORNERING:
    Read the manual and follow the suggestions. Lean toward the handlebar closest to the inside of the corner. (Right-bar on right turns; left-bar on left turns.) This shifts your weight on the machine and also puts your head slightly lower to the center of gravity; causing you to have less of the lateral-pull associated with cornering with a Spyder. Use your knees on the sides of the seat to help secure yourself on tight-fast corners. Your passenger can lean some also if they wish; however they should hang onto their grab-rails in corners. Read the Motorcycle Safety Foundation’s guide on cornering a motorcycle. The setup they suggest prior to entering a corner applies to the Spyder.

    DO NOT RIDE THE BRAKE, or touch the brake when riding or cornering:

    Pay attention to whether you are doing this and stop-it! Far too many people seem to have this bad-habit, and the Spyder’s Nanny doesn't like it. The Nanny-system will likely begin to give you trouble eventually. So blame yourself if you ride your brake and have problems!

    Apply brake when starting the engine:
    Too many new riders are finding themselves stranded with a Spyder that won't start; until they finally put their foot on the brake and find their Spyder starts right-up. An SE5 Spyder requires pressure on the brake to start it unless you are in neutral. Many make sure it is in neutral before shutting the motor down. You don't have to do that. The SE5 Spyder will go into neutral automatically when started while applying the brake.

    Locking the glove box and handlebars:
    (Shame on those that did not read the manual to know this!) When parked; turn the handlebars fully to the left or right (does not matter which direction), then turn the ignition-key one-quarter turn to the left (counter-clockwise) -- then pull the key directly out without turning it back to the right. (The key will have been in the 9-3 o'clock position when turned to the left.) Your glove box and handlebars are now locked.

    • CAUTION: Be careful of putting heat-sensitive items in your glove box (from the engine). Also if it might shift around to where it jams the glove box shut. If the glove box jams from something in it... try shaking the Spyder or moving the Spyder forward or backward to move the contents to un-jam it. Sometimes simply taking a ride can be enough to move the contents to un-jam the glove box. A better idea is simply to not overfill the glove box.

    Cruise Control Hint:
    When disengaging the cruise-control (by tapping the brakes slightly) the Spyder makes an abrupt slow down. To eliminate this, slightly "roll-on" the throttle (as if slightly accelerating) before tapping the brakes. When doing so, the cruise control will disengage smoothly without the jerking motion of a slow down. Practice this a couple times until you see how easy it is to solve this problem.

    Do not ride on gravel roads:
    Despite the fact you are on three-wheels -- you are also "belt-driven". Rocks and belts don't mix. Try to avoid riding on gravel whenever possible, and check your belt right after doing so if you have to ride on gravel.
    Stop-Light Activation:
    Spyders sometimes cannot activate stop-lights controlled by sensors implanted in the road at the stop; or that have infra-red sensors. When pulling up to a stop-light, look to see if there is a square or rectangle tar-shape on the road. If there is, pull the center of your Spyder over the top of one of the tar-strips -- preferably at the corner of the square or rectangle. This will expose as much metal of your Spyder as possible to help set-off the sensors.
    If you do not see sensors markings; look to see if the lights have an infra-red sensor up near the lights. Typically, they are aluminum-color and look a bit like a camera pointed at the stopping location. If present, position your Spyder dead-center of where it is pointing to help set it off.
    Be sure you are not too far back or forward of the area you need to be for either of these sensors -- otherwise you will not set them off. Pay attention, and stop where you are supposed to.
    At lights where sensors do not work well, I pull forward safely enough to let the vehicle behind me set-off the sensors. Sometimes I have to motion the vehicle to move forward behind me. Most drivers know what I am referring to and do it.
    Many states have laws allowing you to move through an intersection after waiting for a specific time. My state has such a law, and I use it any time the lights do not work. Check the laws of the states you are traveling through.

    Pay attention to how your Spyder is running:
    If your Spyder is showing even the slightest sign of not running or operating right; check to be sure you are not guilty of doing, or are not doing any of the items listed here.
    If not, then get your Spyder checked-out soon as possible or risk having problems later -- possibly while on a trip. Sometimes a subtle difference is an early sign of something going wrong or out of adjustment. Spyders can be sensitive machines.


    SHIFTING SUGGESTIONS:
    (The shifting-point suggestions do not apply to the 2014 RTS with the new 1330 engine. However, other information contained here may still apply.)

    Shift point for the 1330's: Initial suggestions are to shift in the range of 2,500 to 3,000 rpm's.

    Shift and cruise at higher RPM's (900 series engines only): This seems to be a big hurdle for too many owners of the 900 series engine models. Get over your fear of running the Spyder's Rotax engine at high rpm's. A properly maintained Rotax engine is designed to run at high rpm’s. Do not listen to anyone telling you otherwise. Instead, read-on further about shifting suggestions and other valuable tips.
    For proof:

    • The RTS SE5's "Trailer Mode" (with fully loaded trailer) won't let you shift out of first-gear until you hit almost 28 MPH!
    • Check this link also, where the owner's Spyder suffered problems by running at low rpm's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...ifting-results

    Gas Mileage at Higher RPM's: For those that think they are getting better mileage at lower rpm's, you are going find your mileage is may improve at higher rpm's with a Spyder due to the fact the Rotax engine's power-band is approximately between 5000 to 6500 rpm's; thus its "power to fuel-efficiency" will be found within that rpm range. Keep your Spyder in that power-band and it will provide benefit to you in many ways.

    Engine Lugging:
    Do NOT lug your Rotax engine! Geez... this is NOT your car or Harley! This is a Rotax engine. Lugging occurs when having the Spyder in too-high of gear at too-low of rpm's while accelerating somewhat aggressively. Do NOT lug your engine -- period!

    • Example: When in fourth gear doing 50 MPH and deciding to accelerate to 65 quickly. You might cause the Spyder to “lug”.
    • Lugging is evident when you hear or feel knocking and vibrations beyond the norm. Lugging can be done in any gear between second to fifth. Avoid accelerating aggressively while you are in too high of a gear while at a lower rpm. Downshift before doing so.
    • NOTE: The RTS-SE5's manual may confuse some on pages 71 and 76 (2011 manual) where it mentions 3,000 rpm's as the "magic-number" to shift; and not to exceed 4,000 rpm's. This references someone learning to ride the Spyder for the first time -- not necessarily the normal operating range.

    SE5 Clutch Engagement and Performance: The Spyder's SE5 clutch is considered fully engaged (stalled) when the rpm's are at 3200 (+/- 200). See the manual.

    • Running at rpm's lower than this range for extended periods allows some slippage in the clutch, resulting in eventual premature wear on the clutch. (They are expensive to replace.)

    Best performance is realized by most when keeping your Spyder's RPM's at 4300 or higher no matter what gear you are in at any time (First-gear being the exception, of course).

    • Keep in mind; this does NOT mean to shift at 4300 rpm’s; but rather to shift at higher rpm’s so that the rpm’s only drop to 4300 when engaged in the next, higher gear.
    • If ever shifting at 4300 rpm’s, it will drop the rpm’s close to the “clutch-locked” rpm of around 3500; which is far below the power-band of the engine.


    DO NOT USE ALL 5-GEARS ALL THE TIME: (6 gears with the SE6):
    Just because the Spyder has 5 or 6 gears does NOT mean you have to always use all of them all the time! Apparently there are far too many who assume they have to shift their Spyder up to fifth or sixth gear no matter what their speed is, and this could be a problem.

    • You DO NOT have to use all five/six gears every time you ride your Spyder! Get over what ever is making you think you need to.
    • Keep in mind the recommendation of keeping your rpm’s at 4300 and higher with a 5-speed 900 series engine. If you keep your rpm’s at 4300 or higher you sometimes cannot up-shift to a higher gear without dropping below 4300.
    • Example: When cruising with a 5-speed around town at 39 to 49 MPH you should not leave 3rd-gear. You should stay in 3rd-gear in that scenario.
    • You can cruise between 39 - 49 MPH all day in 3rd-gear. It is okay to do so.
    • Shifting to 4th-gear in that scenario will drop the RPM's below the 4300 range; which strains the Spyder's ability to perform at its best power-range and diminishes the performance and enjoyment of your machine.
    • The Rotax engine starts providing its power at around 5000 rpm’s and higher. Running your Rotax engine within its peak power-band provides more power, and possibly better fuel consumption and less stress on it.
      • Those who believe they are being more gentle on their Rotax by running at low rpm’s and while in higher gears are likely doing the exact opposite. Instead, they are potentially causing more stress; which can lead to other problems later on.
      • To get power (torque) at anything below 5000 RPM's is dependent on you being in the correct (lower) gear while keeping the rpm’s up to at least 4300 at minimum. Anything less simply delivers lack-luster power to the wheels. You will know it when you increase the throttle and your Spyder does not respond with any "pep" or feels too mushy.
      • Operating a vehicle more safely requires it be operated at its peak performance-range.

    • You will know it eventually by “feel”; to where there is always power available at the throttle always. If your Spyder feels “mushy” at the throttle, then downshift.


    SHIFTING-POINT SUGGESTIONS for a RTS-SE5:

    1st to 2nd-gear: Shift when speed is between 22 MPH and 29+ MPH - no sooner!
    2nd to 3rd-gear: Shift when rpm's are at 5,100+ (5,100 rpm's in 2nd gear is at 39 MPH. Up-shifting to 3rd gear drops the rpm’s to 4,300 -- exactly the rpm's you want to stay above.)
    3rd to 4th-gear: Shift when rpm's are at 5,100+ (5,100 rpm's in 3rd gear is at 49 MPH -- again, up-shifting to 4th drops the rpm’s to 4,300.)
    4th to 5th-gear: Shift to 5th only when you reach 65 MPH on level terrain.

    • You can ride ALL-DAY in 4th-gear between 49 MPH up to and including 65 MPH. (Some run at much higher rpm's than that.)
    • If you are cruising between 49 MPH and 65 MPH, you do not need to use 5th gear. It is okay to ride in 4th-gear in this range all day, for hours on end, and for as long as you own your Spyder. Simply resist shifting to 5th-gear in that range.
    • NOTE: Cruising in 4th gear between 63-65 MPH will have the rpm's in the mid 5,000 rpm range -- which begins to put the engine in its better performance-range (more power) which is what you want!
    • You will likely find your Spyder will run quieter, smoother, and still have power at the throttle in that rpm range, and the dreaded "belt-vibration" might not be a problem when you finally get used to the above suggestions.

    5th-gear: Use only when you are at a minimum of 65 MPH and on level terrain... and downshift on the hills.

    • On hilly terrain, you'll need to upshift and downshift frequently to keep the Spyder's rpm’s above 4300 rpm's at minimum.
    • Do not let your Spyder lug it's way uphills! You should be treated so poorly for doing so.

    Big V-Twin Riders and the Rotax Engine (900 series engines):

    • Big V-twin riders are often too accustomed to their engine lugging along at 2,100 to 3,500 RPM's, and expect a Spyder to do the same. Doing so is a killer for the 900 series Spyder engine.
    • The Rotax 900 series engine is NOT a typical V-Twin; thus it is best not to operate it as one.

    DO NOT roll-off the throttle when shifting with the SE5 and SE6: The manual states you do not have to roll-off the throttle when shifting with the SE5/SE6 system.

    • Hold the throttle steady (do not accelerate or decelerate) when hitting the paddle-shifter at the above recommended shift-points, and you will likely find your Spyder SE5/SE6 shifts very smoothly when doing so. Try it... eventually, you'll become very good at shifting.
    • If you are hearing “clunks” when shifting; then you are not likely shifting at high enough rpm’s. We cannot emphasize shifting at higher rpm’s enough!

    Do Not hold the SE5 and SE6 shift-paddle too long when shifting:

    • A few have had problems when resting their fingers “heavy” on the paddle-shifter; which apparently can confuse the Spyder's Nanny regarding what your intentions are. It is a good idea to get out of the habit if you are doing this before you experience problems.
    • Hold the paddle-shifter only long enough to shift gears.

    Downshifting with the SE5 and SE6: There is a lot conversation about this subject.

    • The SE5 will automatically downshift for you; so you are not required to downshift if you do not want to.
    • However, advanced riders recommend getting in the habit of manually downshifting at all times. Manually downshifting helps maintain rider-control of their machine at any moment (by maintaining power and torque-control at a more optimal configuration).
    • A "BUDS" update moved the SE5 downshifts up to a higher RPM from the previous, however it still remains below the clutch's "stalled" (locked) rpm.
    • In rare occurrences when coming to a full-stop suddenly and fast, some found their machine may not downshift into first-gear when not manually downshifting. When this does occur it is a "pain". No quick resolution... you just have to repeatedly try to get into first again. Rev the engine, try reverse, try anything... eventually it should shift; while drivers honk at you for not moving!

    IN CONCLUSION OF SHIFTING SUGGESTIONS: (For the 900 series engine): Simply believe what you just read above about shifting and engine performance and do it. Your will discover an entirely different machine when you finally do so.

    MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS TO CHECK OR DO:

    Tire Pressure and Shock-Setting:
    Both makes a big difference in how the Spyder handles. Tire pressure and shock setting depends on your load-weight, and type of riding, but there will be an optimal tire pressure and shock stiffness. Check these settings often -- and remember, no vehicle operates at its best when over-weighted! Sorry... but that is just how it is.

    Tire pressure settings:
    Tire pressure preference varies, but a start is 18 pounds in the front tires and 28 pounds in the back tire. (The RT-S SE5 2011 manual recommends 15-17 pounds for the front tire; and 28-30 for the rear tire.) Some 2013 models have a new front-end design. Recent suggestions for 2013's front-tire pressure is at 15-16 psi (NancysToys). No other reports on additional adjustments yet. No reports on the 2014 RTS 1330 yet.

    Front shock settings (if you have adjustable shocks):
    A starting-point for the front (manually adjusted) shock setting is 4 or 5. Seems the stiffer the better for most -- especially if you are “loading” the Spyder (check the manual for load limits). Don't forget the RTS has a rear air-shock that can also be adjusted to your liking. (READ THE MANUAL)

    Check your battery cables, fuses, and such often:

    Anytime these get loose from vibration the Spyder's Nanny will "speak to you". These, seemingly "small", issues are often found to be a the root of many owners' problem-posts. Do let yourself be a victim of forgetting these simple inspection points.

    Check your windshield brackets often:

    They have been known to fail occasionally. If you run with your shield "full-up" most of the time; check them often. Have them replaced if you notice any small cracks.

    Battery Tenders:

    "Tenders" help prolong a battery's life by “conditioning” it, while keeping it charged. (Short-rides may not always sufficiently charge your battery.)
    Make sure you get a battery-tender -- NOT a regular charger for this purpose. There is a difference!
    Tenders are particularly valuable if you store your Spyder for longer periods of time (typically more than a few weeks without riding).

    • IMPORTANT NOTE (Pre-2013's): When permanently attaching the pig-tails cables for your tender; NEVER loosen the negative jumper terminal connection (found under the seat when you open it); or use it to ground any accessory!
    • You need to connect the battery-tender "pig-tails" to the actual battery terminal posts found only by removing some of the panels. This issue has been well publicized on spyderlovers.com. The following thread is one you can start with regarding this: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-FRIGGIN-IDIOT
    • It is troublesome to remove the Tupperware to get to the actual battery terminals or other ground connections, but it is essential on the Spyder to do so.
    • Starting with the 2013's, the battery is now accessible through the front trunk (frunk); which makes it a lot easier for get to it.

    Fluid levels (brake, oil, coolant) have to be correct (All models). Check the fluids as you add miles and top-them-off; otherwise risk having problems with your Spyder (sometimes fairly major).

    • Low brake fluid: Can cause your Spyder to throw a code; thus stopping your trip while you scratch your head wondering why. Brake fluid level can go down as your brake-pads wear over time.
    • Low Oil can cause SE5/SE6 Shifting Problems: A low oil reading; at or below the ADD mark, on the dip stick has been known to cause shifting problems. Failure to maintain a proper oil level might not only cause shifting problems, but possibly premature clutch failure. Keep your oil properly filled, as per your manual. BRP suggests checking the oil-level every 300-miles.
    • Coolant levels: Check this occasionally. Leaks have been known to occur occasionally in the system. Any low-level indication should be looked at soon by a technician at the first opportunity.
    • Here is a link to a great tutorial on an oil-change for the 2014 RTS 1330. It notes a few errors in the manual: (Provided by Texas) http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/showthread.php?64329-2014-Spyder-RT-Oil-Change

    SE5/SE6 shifting problems / Cracked Vacuum Hoses:
    It has been noticed the vacuum hoses related to shifting on the SE5's have caused shifting problems when they become brittle and crack. Have these checked regularly as part of your maintenance program and replace them if needed. (No reports on the 2014 SE6's yet; but this may still be something to watch in your maintenance program.)


    SE5/SE6 Shifting Sensor:

    It appears the "shifting-sensor" on a few SE5's have eventually failed causing the machine not to shift; or to shift inconsistently. No advance resolution for this problem; just a suggestion that you pay attention to your machine's shifting, and have this checked occasionally when at the dealer. (Again, this may also be a maintenance point for the SE6's)

    Unlocking a Stuck Frunk (Front trunk): (Provided by Finless)

    This is a link to a thread on Spyderlovers.com providing a video of how to get your "frunk" unstuck; as well as cautionary words about keeping it from getting stuck. Several of the posts within the thread discuss the various differences between models and model-years; however it appears this valuable piece of information would work for most.


    DO NOT Overfill the Gas Tank:
    This causes a few problems. When you get an inch or more below the top of the tank, stop filling it - period. Overfilling has been known to cause fuel to get into the evap-canister; which leads to problems with gas-fumes (smell), and a potential fire hazard. BRP (late 2012, early 2013) sent all owners of all models new gas-caps to seal better and help with the overall problem. However, the gas-fume smell can be persistent in some cases. See your dealer if you experience an excessive smell of fuel when riding or after. There are a few threads on the subject that you can thumb-through and share with your mechanic.


    Security Screws on the Body Panel: (NancysToys) DO NOT REMOVE THEM!
    Any security screws on a Spyder are there for a reason...they are not to be removed. On an RT they hold the posts that slip into the rubber grommets that hold the body panel in place. These are angled, and indexed to hold them in the correct position. Remove the standard Torx screws then pull the panel out of the grommets. Be careful putting the panel back on...the grommets can be pushed through pretty easily. Wetting the grommets and post first helps. Do not lubricate the grommets unless you want to lose a panel...especially the oil check panel and its twin sister.

    Radio Pre-sets: (Provided by "Badazzspydee") Apparently some manuals have not provided complete instructions on setting presets for radio stations. Here are the instructions to do so.

    • Press “Mode” button until the “Audio icon” appears.
    • Use the “right or left command buttons” to find the radio station you want.
    • A long press will do a seek to the next available station. Continue doing a seek until the station you want appears.
    • Here is the missing step. Press the “Set” button longer than one-second to enter the Tune or Setup screen. The word “Record” should appear under the numbers of the current radio station. The shop manual states that you can tune the station in increments of .2 by short pressing the left or right command buttons now.
    • Short press the “Up” button until the “Preset number” you want appears in the box to the left side of the screen. I noticed this step can be touchy when trying to get the number to stay in the box!
    • Immediately press and hold the “down button”.
    • Once the preset takes, the screen will exit the Tune or Setup screen and returns to the initial Audio screen.
    • Repeat steps 2 through 5 for the next preset. Note that doing a short press of the left or right command buttons will cycle through the already set presets. A long press will start the seek.

    Fuel Octane:
    This subject is not up for a long debate on this thread. Fuel octane (and what it means) is second only to discussions on oil; and there are as many opinions and misperceptions as there are people giving them -- so if you have an opinion on fuel octane -- put it on another thread PLEASE!
    Fuel octane rating does NOT indicate whether one is superior to another; as many believe. In other words, 93 octane is not a superior fuel to 83 octane. It is simply different and designed for a specific engine use.
    What you should know though, is manufacturers do not just “make-up” an octane recommendation out of thin-air for their engines.
    Using a fuel of an octane-rating out of the recommended range can cause: Poor performance, possibly higher fuel consumption, and engine-knocking (damage to the engine); just to name a few issues.
    Your Spyder is an expensive vehicle, so make your own decision.
    Read your owner's manual for the recommended octane-rating for your model and location (U.S. / Non-U.S.)


    Custom, after-market equipment is available for most model types and years to help improve your riding experience. To find these, we suggest you look to the sponsors of Spyderlovers.com; as well as read what others have added to their Spyders to improve their rides.


    Lastly; be sure to have fun and ride often... which probably should be the #1 "MUST DO".



    Disclaimer: The "Do's & Do Not's" is provided solely for informational purposes, and from sources thought to be reliable. The information may be updated, corrected, or deleted without notice to the potential end-user at any time. The end-user of any or all of this information remains wholly liable for their actions or inactions relating to the use of this information. The information is not intended to be a complete guide to the operation of the vehicle of reference; thus the end-user must always refer to their user's manual or qualified dealer as the final authorized source. Spyderlovers.com, its founder, officers, members, affiliates, and sponsors are not liable for one's use, or lack of use, of any or all information. Any end-user application of, or reference to, this information hereby confirms the end-user's complete knowledge, understanding, and acceptance of their sole and complete liability relating to the use of the information provided.


    2014 rt-s black,bump skid,baja ron swaybar and shock spring adjusters,rivco highway mounts &pegs and trunk flag holders 2014 900 ace renegade

  25. #225
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    Default Do's and Do Nots

    This post Do's and Do Nots is GREAT! I'm a newbie on a bike/Spyder (3 months) and been changing gears way to soon.
    Thank you. This will make my ride even that much more enjoyable.
    I've read the Do's and Do Nots at least 3 times now.

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