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  1. #151
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    Default Gravel roads - oh, no!

    I just bought a 2013 RT-S. Don't even have it yet, it's still in the crate at the dealer's. Looking through the don'ts, obviously riding on gravel roads is a no-no. Well, I live on a gravel road and this was one of the biggest reasons I bought a Spyder. I've ridden Harley's for a long time, but quit riding when I built a house out in the country. Dumping an Ultra on a gravel road just didn't sound like a good time to me. The longest stretch to get to hard surface is about 3/4 of a mile. Am I destined to have a broken down bike all the time? I was all excited to get back in the saddle.

  2. #152
    Very Active Member JkRbbt's Avatar
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    H-dog,
    I just put a belt guard from SpyderPops on my 2013 RT. Very easy install. I would think between the belt guard and just taking it easy on your gravel patch, you should be good to go! I just did 60 miles of twisties yesterday. All kinds of left-over gravel from winter sanding operations. Would have actually been dangerous on 2 wheels. You are gonna LOVE the stability of this machine. Have fun!

  3. #153
    Active Member sjcpanther's Avatar
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    Default Gear Shifting with SM5

    A newbie question here. I just got my 2012 RT SM5 a week ago. Do the RPM targets for the SE5 go for the SM5 as well?

  4. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by JkRbbt View Post
    H-dog,
    I just put a belt guard from SpyderPops on my 2013 RT. Very easy install. I would think between the belt guard and just taking it easy on your gravel patch, you should be good to go! I just did 60 miles of twisties yesterday. All kinds of left-over gravel from winter sanding operations. Would have actually been dangerous on 2 wheels. You are gonna LOVE the stability of this machine. Have fun!
    Thanks, I feel a bit better now. Just ordered the "missing belt guard". Really can't wait to get back on a bike.

  5. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by sjcpanther View Post
    A newbie question here. I just got my 2012 RT SM5 a week ago. Do the RPM targets for the SE5 go for the SM5 as well?
    Yes. Start with what is recommended and adjust as you get used to your Spyder. The clutch information does not apply.

    Enjoy!

    SL #7026
    VBA #652
    HOG #3935417
    2011 Viper-Red Spyder RT SE5 & Trailer
    2017 HD Ultra Limited
    Former Rides: 2014 HD Ultra Limited; '04 Kawa Nomad; '09 HD Ultra-Classic; and many Hondas through the years.
    Spyder Newbies Do's & Do Not's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Spyder-owners

  6. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by hogdog View Post
    Thanks, I feel a bit better now. Just ordered the "missing belt guard". Really can't wait to get back on a bike.
    Enjoy!

    SL #7026
    VBA #652
    HOG #3935417
    2011 Viper-Red Spyder RT SE5 & Trailer
    2017 HD Ultra Limited
    Former Rides: 2014 HD Ultra Limited; '04 Kawa Nomad; '09 HD Ultra-Classic; and many Hondas through the years.
    Spyder Newbies Do's & Do Not's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Spyder-owners

  7. #157
    Active Member sjcpanther's Avatar
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    Tried the new gear shifting approach on a nice ryde yesterday. Definitely felt more power and acceleration. Just something to get used to, hearing the engine at higher revs. But if that's what the Spyder likes, then that's what the Spyder will get. ��

  8. #158
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    Default I too can relate---just the way it is----

    Quote Originally Posted by hogdog View Post
    I just bought a 2013 RT-S. Don't even have it yet, it's still in the crate at the dealer's. Looking through the don'ts, obviously riding on gravel roads is a no-no. Well, I live on a gravel road and this was one of the biggest reasons I bought a Spyder. I've ridden Harley's for a long time, but quit riding when I built a house out in the country. Dumping an Ultra on a gravel road just didn't sound like a good time to me. The longest stretch to get to hard surface is about 3/4 of a mile. Am I destined to have a broken down bike all the time? I was all excited to get back in the saddle.

    I can so relate---I wanted a Spyder--bought one- and live on a gravel road. I got 10 to 15 mph max until I hit black top--which is about a mile. I have not gotten my Spyderpops Missing Rock Guard put on yet, This weekend though, and I have heard a couple of rocks get crunched in the belt. Mainly cause where I live they are too cheap to use heavier gravel for the county roads. Anyways--I keep hoping for a miracle and dust control to be put down on our roads. Someday, when enough rich people move out by me I guess. Just use good judgement and you'll be okay.

  9. #159
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    Default

    Updated with a few additions.

    Missing vent (that was never missing)
    Toolkit location (for those that didn't read the manual)
    RT Nanny-Code retrieval procedure (Jerbear reminded me I only had it for the RS)
    Complete instructions on pre-setting radio-stations (Badazzsydee discovered the manual's instructions were incomplete)
    ...and couple other items.

    Hope it helps!

    Ride often, safe, and alert!
    Last edited by Illinois Boy; 04-12-2013 at 10:02 PM.

    SL #7026
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    2011 Viper-Red Spyder RT SE5 & Trailer
    2017 HD Ultra Limited
    Former Rides: 2014 HD Ultra Limited; '04 Kawa Nomad; '09 HD Ultra-Classic; and many Hondas through the years.
    Spyder Newbies Do's & Do Not's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Spyder-owners

  10. #160
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    Default tool kit

    I don't mean to be difficult and I'm not trying to be a smart As but on the RSS and STS The tool kit is in the Frunk mounted on the right side.
    Thanks Kubie

  11. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by kubie View Post
    I don't mean to be difficult and I'm not trying to be a smart As but on the RSS and STS The tool kit is in the Frunk mounted on the right side.
    Thanks Kubie
    The list was referencing the RT... sorry Kubie. I'll add that to the list though. Thanks!

    SL #7026
    VBA #652
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    2011 Viper-Red Spyder RT SE5 & Trailer
    2017 HD Ultra Limited
    Former Rides: 2014 HD Ultra Limited; '04 Kawa Nomad; '09 HD Ultra-Classic; and many Hondas through the years.
    Spyder Newbies Do's & Do Not's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Spyder-owners

  12. #162
    Active Member kubie's Avatar
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    Default Bump

    Bumpity Bump Bump Bump!!! STICKY THIS PLEASE!!!!!!!!!

  13. #163
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    Thumbs up Best Read


    This is the best read we have had since joining SpyderLovers.Wow did we learn.(we are better SpyderRyders for it) Please add more. Thanks
    [/QUOTE]

  14. #164
    Very Active Member Wiredux's Avatar
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    Default

    Is the procedure to get the codes on the ST the same as the RT?

  15. #165
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    Quote Originally Posted by NCSpyderRT View Post
    Is the procedure to get the codes on the ST the same as the RT?
    I do not know... If someone does... let me know and I'll include what the ST procedure is. I would assume so, but wouldn't bet the ranch on it.

    SL #7026
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    2011 Viper-Red Spyder RT SE5 & Trailer
    2017 HD Ultra Limited
    Former Rides: 2014 HD Ultra Limited; '04 Kawa Nomad; '09 HD Ultra-Classic; and many Hondas through the years.
    Spyder Newbies Do's & Do Not's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Spyder-owners

  16. #166
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    Default New but lots of miles for Newbie

    I just returned from 9 days in the Phoenix AZ area. I went there for the specific and singular purpose of renting and riding a Spyder for a week to see if I really want to buy one. Rydeaspyder.com was my source of an RT that I rode for 8 days - in lots of differing circumstances. I read lots of Spyderweb before taking the trip but failed to see this thread. Newcomers heed well - the information herein will save you lots of grief. I put on over 1,200 miles in 6 actual days of riding. It was great and my rental was a great tool. Even though the RT had over 30k miles on it, it treated me well. I highly recommend this approach to a decision of this $$ magnitude. I come with many years of riding experience, my present bikes are: 2011 Superlow 883, 04 Low Rider, 07 Buell Blast, and a 1981 Yamaha 250 Exciter. My "road" bikes are the Superlow (which fits me best) and the Low Rider. At 76 years of age the road trips are getting more difficult with the Harleys. Add a very short inseam of 28" to the equasion and it is easy to see why a bagger (regardless of nameplate) is not high on my wish list. Enter the Spyder - - it proved to be a great tool, a blast to ride and appears to be what I need if I want to continue putting making a couple of longer runs each year. Hope to pick up a yellow RTS the last weekend of Spyderfest 2013. The Major sends

  17. #167
    Active Member kubie's Avatar
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    Default STICKY!?!?!?!?!?!

    Bumpity Bump Bump Bump!!! STICKY THIS PLEASE!!!!!!!!!

  18. #168
    Registered Users NoJive's Avatar
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    Default

    Just as a note, I have to drive about 1/2 mile on a gravel road to get to the main road. I did order the belt guard, and in the past year of driving on the gravel, I have had no problems. I would recommend you keep it slow though.


    Quote Originally Posted by hogdog View Post
    Thanks, I feel a bit better now. Just ordered the "missing belt guard". Really can't wait to get back on a bike.
    ---------
    Jive
    Beckley, WV
    2012 Pure Magnesium Metallic Spyder RTS SM5, SpyderPops Belt Guard


  19. #169
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    Default Do's & Do Not's for New Spyder Owners: Updated April 24th, 2013

    Quote Originally Posted by Illinois Boy View Post
    Do's & Do Not's for New Spyder Owners: Updated April 24th, 2013


    There are several "things" a Spyder owner needs to know when buying and operating their Spyder to help them have a better experience, and to avoid causing complications later.
    This is a collection of "sage-advice" gathered from various resources on Spyder Lover's and other sources to help you enjoy your experience with your Spyder; and to avoid "beginner mistakes" that may cause grief later-on.
    New recommendations and suggestions will be added as they are discovered.
    This list will include suggestions for stock Spyders only.

    Purchase from a dealer with a good reputation:

    • Do your homework on the dealer you are buying from.
    • Check around to see if others have had good experiences with the dealer; both in the sales and service departments.
    • Check on Spyderlovers.com to see what others say.
    • Setting-up a new Spyder seems to be a huge problem if not done correctly by the dealer; thus increasing your odds of having a miserable experience.


    READ THE MANUAL FRONT COVER TO THE BACK!!!

    • The Spyder is fun and you are anxious to ride it; but do yourself a HUGE favor and read the manual entirely before doing so. You may be surprised what you (and possibly your dealer) may learn.


    Missing vent:

    • Too many new owners get home and think they are missing a vent on their Spyder. You are not. So far, there never was one for models up to 2013. Air-flow is the official reason from BRP.


    Toolkit:

    • It is underneath your seat, unless you have an RSS or STS -- then the tool kit is in the Frunk (Front Trunk) mounted on the right side. Read your manual!


    Learn how your Spyder works:

    • You do not have to become a mechanic, but having knowledge will help you out in more ways than can be mentioned. Spyderlovers.com is a good place to learn.


    The “Nanny” and “Codes” -- what are these?

    • The Spyder’s operations are controlled by a computer system, affectionately referred to as the “Nanny”. The Nanny monitors your Spyder when running for safety purposes and is extremely sensitive to anything operating out of its designed limits. When it senses something wrong it may affect the operation of your Spyder. When a problem is detected by the Nanny, you will see your check-engine light (an orange dash-screen).
    • When this happens, the Nanny will override your ability to operate the Spyder “normally”; or put your Spyder into the “Limp Mode”; which may not allow it to operate at all.
      • WARNING:
      • The Limp-Mode can kick-in while riding your Spyder and immediately slows it down. Be sure to exit the road immediately to a safe location if this happens.
      • At this point you can find out if there is a “code” generated; which is a code-number identifying the problem.
        • The problem(s) associated with the various codes requires a Maintenance & Repair Manual; which is not provided upon purchase of a Spyder -- however, the code-number will remain stored in the Spyder's system for your dealer-technician, so you don't have to worry if you do not have the manual. Just get your Spyder to a dealer and they will find the code generated.
        • Footnote: The "system" keeps a record in memory of the functions of your Spyder to include your speeds, RPM's and etc. So, if you are abusing your Spyder... the computer's records will let your technician know.


    • Retrieving Codes for an RS: (Provided by Nancy's Toys.)
      • Turn Ignition key to "ON".

      • Push the "MODE" button to display total hours screen.Start engine and run until check engine light (or other fault indication) is displayed.

      • Press and hold "MODE" button while pushing the "High Beam Flash" button rapidly five times (within 2 seconds).

      • The active faults will be displayed or "No Active Fault Code" will be shown.

      • If you do not get a message, you didn't get the flash beams sequence done during the allotted time. Try again.

      • Jot the code-number down and check the list in the manual to determine your problem. Share this with your mechanic.


    • Retrieving Codes for an RT & ST: (RT provided by Jerbear / ST by Billybovine)
      • ​Turn Ignition key to "ON" and wait for the multifunction gauge to complete its self-test.

      • Push the "MODE" "SET" & "Turn Signal" buttons at the same time. (Push all three straight-in.) ​​If there was a code generated, you will see it on your screen. You might want to try it a couple times to make sure you pushed the three buttons at the same time.


    Relax your grip on the handlebars:

    • People's first propensity is to squeeze the daylights out of the grips. This will make the Spyder skip from side-to-side causing a "jerky-ride" (lateral movement).
    • JUST RELAX YOUR GRIP! You'll soon see the Spyder's ride will have a reduction in its "jerkiness". Relaxing typically comes naturally after riding it for several hundred miles.
    • However; remember, a Spyder will always have some lateral movement to it; which is only part of the thrill of riding one!

    • NOTE: Motorcyclists are the ones seemingly most affected by the lateral movement associated with the Spyder. They are just going to have to realize the Spyder is not a two-wheel vehicle and it is going to feel different. Also motorcycle riders need to "un-learn" counter-steering when riding a Spyder. It simply doesn't apply to a Spyder.


    Do not "ride the brake” or touch the brake when riding or cornering:

    • Pay attention to whether you are doing this and stop-it!
    • Too many people seem to have this bad-habit, and the Spyder doesn't like it.
    • The Nanny-system will likely begin to give you trouble. So blame yourself if you ride your brake and have problems.


    SHIFTING SUGGESTIONS:


    • Shift and cruise at higher RPM's: Get over your fear of running the Spyder's Rotax engine at high RPM's. A properly maintained Rotax engine is designed to run at high RPM’s.
      • For proof; the RTS SE5's "Trailer Mode" (with fully loaded trailer) won't let you shift out of 1st gear until you hit almost 28 MPM!


    • Do Not Lug Your Engine: Lugging occurs when having the Spyder in too-high of gear at too-low of RPM's while accelerating somewhat aggressively.
      • Example: When in 4th gear doing 50 MPH and deciding to accelerate to 65 quickly. You might cause the Spyder to “lug”.
      • Lugging is evident when you hear or feel knocking and vibrations beyond the norm. Lugging can be done in any gear between 2nd to 5th. So, avoid accelerating aggressively while you are in too high of a gear while at a lower-end RPM. Downshift before doing so.
      • NOTE: The RTS-SE5's manual may confuse some on pages 71 and 76 (2011 manual) where it mentions 3,000 RPM's as the "magic-number" to shift; and not to exceed 4,000 RPM's. This references someone learning to ride the Spyder for the first time -- not necessarily the normal operating range.


    • SE5 Clutch Engagement and Performance: The Spyder's SE5 clutch is generally engaged when the RPM's are at 3500 or higher (see the manual).
      • Allowing your Spyder to run at RPM's lower than 3,500 RPM’s for extended periods allows some slippage in the clutch, resulting in eventual early wear on the clutch.
      • Most find the best performance is realized by keeping your Spyder's RPM's at 4300 or higher -- no matter what gear you are in at any time (1st gear being the exception, of course).


    • DO NOT USE ALL 5-GEARS ALL THE TIME: Just because the Spyder has 5-gears does NOT mean you have to always use all of them all the time! Apparently many assume they have to shift their Spyder up to 5th gear no matter what their speed is, and this is a problem.
      • You DO NOT have to use all five gears every time you ride your Spyder. (Keep in mind the recommendation of keeping your RPM’s at 4300 and higher.) To keep your RPM’s at 4300 or higher you sometimes cannot up-shift to a higher gear without dropping below 4300.
      • Example: When cruising around town at 39 to 49 MPH you should not leave 3rd-gear. You should stay in 3rd-gear in that scenario. You can cruise between 39 - 49 MPH all day in 3rd-gear. It is okay to do so. Shifting to 4th-gear in that scenario will drop the RPM's below the 4300 range; which strains the Spyder's ability to perform at its best power-range and diminishes the performance and enjoyment of your machine.
      • Keep in mind the Rotax engine starts providing its power at around 5000 RPM's and up. To get the most power (torque) out of the engine at anything below 5000 RPM's is dependent on you being in the correct gear to deliver power to the wheels -- the reason to keep your RPM's at 4300 or higher no matter the gear you are in. Anything less simply delivers lack-luster power to the wheels. You will know it when you increase the throttle and your Spyder does not respond with any "pep".
      • Operating a vehicle more safely and at its peak performance requires keeping power available at the throttle at all times. If your Spyder feels "mushy" at the throttle, then downshift.


    SHIFTING-POINT SUGGESTIONS for a RTS-SE5:


    • 1st to 2nd-gear: Shift when your speed is between 22 MPH and 29+ MPH - no sooner!
    • 2nd to 3rd-gear: Shift when the RPM's are at 5,100+ (5,100 RPM's in 2nd gear is at 39 MPH. Up-shifting to 3rd gear drops the RPM’s to 4,300 -- exactly the RPM's you want to stay above.)
    • 3rd to 4th-gear: Shift when RPM's are at 5,100+ (5,100 RPM's in 3rd gear is at 49 MPH -- again, up-shifting to 4th drops the RPM’s to 4,300.)
    • 4th to 5th-gear: Shift to 5th only when you reach 65 MPH on level terrain.
      • You can ride ALL-DAY in 4th-gear between 49 MPH up to and including 65 MPH. (Some run at much higher RPM's than that.)
      • If you are cruising between 49 MPH and 65 MPH, you do not need to use 5th gear. It is okay to ride in 4th-gear in this range all day, for hours on end, and for as long as you own your Spyder. Simply resist shifting to 5th-gear in that range.
      • NOTE: Cruising in 4th gear between 63-65 MPH will have the RPM's in the mid 5,000 RPM range -- which begins to put the engine in its better performance-range (more power) which is what you want!
      • You will likely find your Spyder will run quieter, smoother, and still have power at the throttle in that RPM range, and the dreaded "belt-vibration" might not be a problem when you finally get used to the above suggestions. In a short sentence... you'll find a whole new machine if you operate it as suggested here.

    • 5th-gear: Use only when you are at a minimum of 65 MPH and on level terrain... and downshift on the hills.
      • On hilly terrain, you'll need to upshift and downshift frequently to keep the Spyder's RPM's above 4300 RPM's at minimum.
      • This is a good rule-of-thumb no matter what gear or speed you are traveling. Keep the RPM's above 4300!
      • Do not let your Spyder lug it's way uphills! You should be treated so poorly for doing so!
      • REMEMBER: When shifting to the next higher gear at 5100 RPM's the next gear will engage and drop the RPM's to 4300 -- the RPM you want to stay above.



    • Big V-Twin Riders:
      • Big V-twin riders are likely too used to their engine lugging along at 2,100 to 3,500 RPM's, and expect a Spyder to do the same. Doing so is a killer for the Spyder. The Rotax engine is NOT an typical V-Twin; thus it is best not to try to operate it as one.



    • DO NOT roll-off the throttle: With the SE5 system the manual states you do not have to roll-off the throttle when shifting.
      • Hold the throttle steady (do not accelerate or decelerate) when hitting the paddle-shifter at the above recommended shift-points, and you will likely find your Spyder SE5 shifts very smoothly when doing so. Try it... eventually, you'll become very good at shifting.



    • Do Not hold the shift-paddle too long when shifting, or rest your fingers "heavy" on it when riding:
      • Some have had problems when resting their fingers on the paddle-shifter; which apparently can confuse the Spyder's Nanny regarding what your intentions are. It is a good idea to get out of the habit if you are doing this before you experience problems.
      • Hold the paddle-shifter only long enough to shift gears.



    • Downshifting with the SE5: There is a lot conversation about this subject.
      • The SE5 will automatically downshift for you; so you are not required to downshift if you do not want to.
      • However, it might be noted as to why many experienced riders recommend getting in the habit of manually downshifting. Manually downshifting helps maintain rider-control of their machine at any moment (by maintaining power and torque-control at a more optimal configuration).
      • A "BUDS" update moved the SE5 downshifts up to a higher RPM from the previous, which is an improvement; however it still remains below the clutch's "stalled" (locked) RPM.
      • In addition; on rare occurrences when coming to a full-stop suddenly and fast, some have found their machine may not downshift all the way to 1st gear when not manually downshifting. When this does occur it is a "pain". No quick resolution if this happens... you just have to repeatedly try to get into first again. Rev the engine, try reverse, try anything... eventually it should shift; while drivers honk at you for not moving!



    • In conclusion of shifting-suggestions: Simply believe what you just read above about shifting and engine performance and do it. Your will discover an entirely different machine when you finally do so.


    Apply brake when starting the engine: Simply get into that habit.

    • Too many new riders are finding themselves stranded with a Spyder that won't start; until they finally put their foot on the brake and find their Spyder starts right-up.
    • An SE5 Spyder requires pressure on the brake to start it unless you are in neutral. Many make sure it is in neutral before shutting the motor down. You don't have to do that. The SE5 Spyder will go into neutral automatically when started while applying the brake.


    Tire Pressure and Shock-Setting: Both makes a big difference in how the Spyder handles.

    • Tire pressure and shock setting depends on your load-weight, and type of riding, but there will be an optimal tire pressure and shock stiffness. Check these settings often -- and remember, no vehicle operates at its best when over-weighted! Sorry... but that is just how it is.
    • Front shock (manual) settings: A starting-point for the front (manually adjusted) shock setting is 4 or 5. Seems the stiffer the better for most -- especially if you are “loading” the Spyder (check the manual for load limits). Don't forget the RTS has a rear air-shock that can also be adjusted to your liking. (READ THE MANUAL)
    • Tire pressure settings: Tire pressure preference varies, but a start is 18 pounds in the front tires and 28 pounds in the back tire. (The RT-S SE5 2011 manual recommends 15-17 pounds for the front tire; and 28-30 for the rear tire.)
    • Some 2013 models have a new front-end design. No reports yet on what adjustments these may need, if any.


    Check your battery cables, fuses, and such often:

    • Anytime these get loose from vibration the Spyder's Nanny will "speak to you".


    Pay attention to how your Spyder is running:

    • If your Spyder is showing even the slightest sign of not running or operating right; check to be sure you are not guilty of doing, or are not doing any of the above.
    • If not, then get your Spyder checked-out as soon as possible or risk having problems later -- possibly while on a trip. Sometimes a subtle difference is an early-sign of something going wrong or out of adjustment. Spyders are sensitive machines.


    Check your windshield brackets often:

    • They have been known to fail occasionally. Have them replaced if you notice any small cracks.


    Battery Tenders:

    • "Tenders" help prolong a battery's life by “conditioning” it, while keeping it charged. (Short-rides may not always sufficiently charge your battery.)
    • Make sure you get a battery-tender -- NOT a regular charger for this purpose. There is a difference!

      • IMPORTANT NOTE: When attaching the pig-tails cables for your tender; NEVER loosen the negative jumper terminal connection (found under the seat when you open it); or use it to ground any accessory!
      • You need to connect the battery-tender "pig-tails" to the actual battery terminal posts found only by removing some of the panels. This issue has been well publicized on spyderlovers.com. ad-nauseum. The following thread is one you can start with regarding this: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-FRIGGIN-IDIOT
      • It is troublesome to remove the Tupperware to get to the actual battery terminals or other ground connections, but it is essential on the Spyder to do so.


    Do not ride on gravel roads:

    • Despite the fact you are on three-wheels -- you are also "belt-driven". Rocks and belts don't mix. Just simply avoid doing it whenever possible, and check your belt right after doing so if you have to.


    Fluid levels (brake, oil, coolant) have to be correct:

    • Check these often as your Spyder will not run right if they are not.
    • As an example: Your brake fluid level will go lower as the brake-pads begin to wear due to the brake cylinder having to travel further to contact the pads to the rotors. While your brake-pads may still look good, your brake-fluid is now lower. Some say your Spyder might throw a code for it; thus stopping your trip... while you scratch your head wondering why.
    • Simply check the fluids as you add miles and top-them-off.


    Locking the glove box and handlebars: (Shame on those that did not read the manual to know this!)

    • When parked; turn the handlebars fully to the left or right (does not matter which direction), then turn the ignition-key one-quarter turn to the left (counter-clockwise) -- then pull the key directly out without turning it back to the right. (The key will have been in the 9-3 o'clock position when turned to the left.) Your glove box and handlebars are now locked.
    • CAUTION: Be careful what you put into your glove box if it is sensitive to heat (from the engine); and if it might shift around to where it jams the glove box shut. If the glove box jams from something in it... try shaking the Spyder or moving the Spyder forward or backward to move the contents to un-jam it. Sometimes simply taking a ride can be enough to move the contents to un-jam the glove box. A better idea is simply to not overfill the glove box.


    Cruise Control Hint:

    • When disengaging the cruise-control (by tapping the brakes slightly) the Spyder makes an abrupt slow-down. Some find it to be a very "uncomfortable" feeling.
    • To eliminate this all you have to do is slightly "roll-on" the throttle (as if slightly accelerating) before tapping the brakes.
    • When doing so, the cruise control will disengage without the jerking motion of a slow-down. Practice this a couple times until you see how easy it is to solve this problem.


    Setting Radio Pre-sets: (
    Provided by "Badazzspydee") Apparently some manuals have not provided complete instructions on setting pre-sets for radio stations. Here are the instructions to do so.

    1. Press the Mode button until the Audio icon appears.

    2. Use the right or left command buttons to find the radio station you want. A long press will do a seek to the next available station. Continue doing a seek until the station you want appears.

    3. Here is the missing step. Press the Set button longer than one second to enter the Tune or Setup screen. The word Record should appear under the numbers of the current radio station. The shop manual states that you can tune the station in increments of .2 by short pressing the left or right command buttons now.

    4. Short press the Up button until the Preset number you want appears in the box to the left side of the screen. I noticed that this step can be touchy at times trying to get the number to stay in the box!

    5. Immediately press and hold the down button. Once the preset takes, the screen will exit the Tune or Setup screen and returns to the initial Audio screen.

    6. Repeat steps 2 through 5 for the next preset. Note that doing a short press of the left or right command buttons will cycle through the already set presets. A long press will start the seek.


    Do not over-fill the gas tank.


    • This causes a few problems. So, when you get an inch or more below the top of the tank, stop filling it - period.
    • Over-filling has been known to cause fuel to get into the evap-canister; which leads to problems with gas-fumes (smell), and a potential fire hazard.
    • BRP (late 2012, early 2013) sent all owners of all models new gas-caps that seal better in an effort to help with the overall problem. However, the gas-fume smell can be persistent in some cases.
    • See your dealer if you smell fuel when riding or after.
    • There are a few threads on the subject that you can thumb-through and share with your mechanic.


    FUEL OCTANE:

    • Common-sense tells me not to enter into this subject here. This subject is not up for a long debate on this thread. Fuel octane (and what it means) is second only to discussions on oil; and there are as many opinions and mis-perceptions as there are people giving them -- so if you have an opinion on fuel octane -- put it on another thread PLEASE!
    • First-off; fuel octane rating does NOT indicate whether one is superior to another; as many believe it to be. In other words, 90 octane is not a superior fuel to 83 octane. It is simply different and designed for a specific engine use.

    • What you should know though, is manufacturers do not just “make-up” an octane recommendation out of thin-air for their engines.

    Using a fuel of an octane-rating out of the recommended range can cause:

    • Poor performance, possibly higher fuel consumption, and engine-knocking (damage to the engine); just to name a few issues.
    • ​​Your Spyder is an expensive vehicle. Think about it, and make your own decision.
      Read your owner's manual for the recommended octane-rating for your model and location (U.S. / Non-U.S.)


    Lastly; be sure to have fun and ride often... which probably should be the #1 "MUST DO".




    Disclaimer: The "Do's & Do Not's" is provided solely for informational purposes, and from sources thought to be reliable. The information may be updated, corrected, or deleted without notice to the potential end-user at any time. The end-user of any or all of this information remains wholly liable for their actions or inactions relating to the use of this information. The information is not intended to be a complete guide to the operation of the vehicle of reference; thus the end-user must always refer to their user's manual or qualified dealer as the final authorized source. Spyderlovers.com, its founder, officers, members, affiliates, and sponsors are not liable for one's use, or lack of use, of any or all of the information. Any end-user application of, or reference to, this information hereby confirms the end-user's complete knowledge, understanding, and acceptance of their sole and complete liability relating to the use of the information provided.


    Great Info.

    Thank you so much.

    Dom

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    Default

    Great information and thank you for posting it. I live near 2 school zones so frequently have to go 20 mph; should I leave it in 1st gear all the way thru the school zones?

  21. #171
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    Default Re: "Do's and Do Nots" for new Spyder owners...

    I do. Keeps clutch fully engaged, no lugging. Your machine will thank you for it.

    Sent from Galaxy S3 via Tapatalk
    Name: Eric Heims
    Red 2016 RTS, Diamond R Armrests, Ram X Mount, Doc Humphreys Dampener, BajaRon Swaybar, Spyderpops "Critter Splitter"


    "It is the common fate of the indolent to see their rights become a prey to the active. The condition upon which God hath given liberty to man is eternal vigilance; which condition if he break, servitude is at once the consequence of his crime and the punishment of his guilt." John Philpot Curran 1790



  22. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buckeye Bob View Post
    Great information and thank you for posting it. I live near 2 school zones so frequently have to go 20 mph; should I leave it in 1st gear all the way thru the school zones?
    Yes you should. If you are riding in a 20 mph zone all day, then you should never see 2nd gear.

    Keep in mind, the clutch is not fully stalled (locked) until it is in the 3200 (+/- 200) rpm range. Round that up to 3500 and you'll always be assured the clutch if fully engaged. However, also keep in mind that keeping the rpm's above 4300+ rpm when riding is favored for performance reasons.

    Anything lower than that begins to put more stress on the entire drive-train to perform as it should -- especially if you are pulling a trailer or are loaded to near capacity of the Spyder.

    Also to consider; the Rotax engine for the Spyder power-band is at higher rpm's (closer to 5500 rpm's and up). Most experienced riders/drivers of any vehicle will always tell you to maintain optimum power at the throttle at all times for peak performance and for safety reasons (so power, if needed, is readily available to avoid a situation without having to shift -- don't catch yourself getting lazy and let your Spyder slop-around in the wrong gear/rpm configurations. It is a bad habit and not necessarily a safe practice).

    Running a Spyder at a higher rpm may be hard to get used to. Initially it may sound and feel like you should shift. I assume it is because most all other vehicles people drive/ride run at much lower rpm's -- thus most are not used to how it sounds or feels.

    In addition, some seem to believe running at higher rpm's means always having to be "screaming" around on their Spyder. It does not mean that at all. It simply means not shifting too soon and staying in the proper gear configuration for as long as you are riding it that gear's range (all day if that it the case).

    Do yourself a favor and shift at the higher rpm ranges suggested until you get used to it. When you do, it will eventually feel more natural, and you will appreciate what is being stated here.

    As a footnote for proof: The RTS SE5 in "trailer-mode" pushes-up the shift points fairly close to these ranges. And the down-shift points are at much higher rpm's also. (In trailer-mode, the system down-shifts to 1st gear at the 3200 rpm range of 2nd gear -- which then raises the rpm's back-up to a much higher range when engaged in 1st.)

    Lastly as mentioned, most people feel they have to use all the gears all the time. That is just simply wrong -- period. Get used to STAYING in a particular gear for as long as you are within its speed and rpm range -- even if that means all-day.

    I just took a long ride a week ago pulling my trailer (hundreds of miles) on mostly all interstate highway and rarely used 5th gear, unless I was above 70 MPH. With the drag of the trailer, 5th gear just didn't have the torque needed to pull the slight inclines and fight the wind without stressing some. in 4th... it was a breeze and my Spyder hummed along as smooth as can be -- with power still at the throttle.

    Having said all of this... be sure to keep your Spyder maintained to high standards. Do not slack on giving it what it needs.

    Good luck -- ride safe, often and alert!

    SL #7026
    VBA #652
    HOG #3935417
    2011 Viper-Red Spyder RT SE5 & Trailer
    2017 HD Ultra Limited
    Former Rides: 2014 HD Ultra Limited; '04 Kawa Nomad; '09 HD Ultra-Classic; and many Hondas through the years.
    Spyder Newbies Do's & Do Not's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Spyder-owners

  23. #173
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    Default first ride

    First of all thank you for all the great information.
    I unfortunately have to make my first ride on my Spyder RRS SE5 from the dealer which is a 2.5 hour ride
    Do you have any suggestions for the ride. I have ridden a Spyder before but for a very limited ride. I also used to ride a sport bike, not that they are the same.
    Any insites would be appreciated

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    Very Active Member MRH's Avatar
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    Default

    I've been there! I'd look for surface streets, or slower highways, if you can, to get used to the ride (and, in my case, the very different sense of speed vs. being in a cage). If you are used to bikes (I'd only ridden an ATV in past), this will be far easier for you than it was for me. My wife followed me home in her car (it took all day to do what would normally be a much faster trip, which was about 25% of what it would take me to do the same ride now). I'd certainly get the Spyder in the morning, and take breaks. I very much wish that I'd had the benefit of this thread; it would have prevented me from having to unlearn some bad habits.

    Congrats on the new purchase!

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    Default first ride

    spyder-mumba


    Also, if your Spyder is new, don't forget to avoid ryding at constant speeds for the first 200 miles. Vary your speeds thru all the gears to facilitate the break-in of the engine. Avoid cruise-control until after break-in.

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