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  1. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by NancysToy View Post
    The manual will also tell you that higher preload settings are appropriate with heavy loads.
    Sure. It doesn't say, though that it's as big an issue as it apparently is. It makes sense after-the-fact, but the Spyder is by far the most sensitive vehicle I've ridden in that regard. It's not a criticism of the bike, but a little more emphasis in the manual would be a good thing. It may sound like hyperbole, but the difference is a big deal and potentially a safety issue - in my opinion, of course.

    --jim

  2. #127
    Active Member mdale46's Avatar
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    Default 3 Nov "Do's & Do Not's" Update?

    I just recently copied the "Do's and Do Not's (update from Oct). What changes have you added in the Nov revision?

  3. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdale46 View Post
    I just recently copied the "Do's and Do Not's (update from Oct). What changes have you added in the Nov revision?
    Besides making some adjustment to the wording in a few areas; and "fine-tuning" the shift-sugggestions; these are the three items added in late October and early November.


    • Latest addition was added to "Get a Battery Tender" regarding the warning no to connect accessories or a battery-tender to the terminal connectors (found under the seat), but rather connect directly to the battery posts.
    • Locking the glove-box...
    • Cruise control...
    • Confirmation of where the manual states you do not have to roll-off the throttle when shifting the SE5.


    That is about all I think I added. Hope it helps you!

    Ride safe, often, and alert!

    SL #7026
    VBA #652
    HOG #3935417
    2011 Viper-Red Spyder RT SE5 & Trailer
    2017 HD Ultra Limited
    Former Rides: 2014 HD Ultra Limited; '04 Kawa Nomad; '09 HD Ultra-Classic; and many Hondas through the years.
    Spyder Newbies Do's & Do Not's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Spyder-owners

  4. #129
    Active Member mdale46's Avatar
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    Thanks for the update. I have copied and will put these "instructions" to practice. Thanks again!

  5. #130
    Registered Users sonicsix's Avatar
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    I had read this thread before purchasing my RT-S SE5 as well as reading an online owner's manual. The information here is very helpful. I rode home from the dealer using the shifting guidelines and maintaining 5000-5500 RPMs. Thanks so much to the experienced owners for helping out those of us with less experience.

    I can't imagine why this isn't a sticky.

    2012 Can Am Spyder RT-S SE5, Pure Magnesium
    www.JerryandCynthia.com - Our Riding Adventures

  6. #131
    GOS member (Girls On Spyders) Spyder Smyles's Avatar
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    Default Thanks

    Great information for a newbie like me. Thanks for taking the time to post it.

  7. #132
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    bump for newbies

  8. #133
    Active Member Farmbanker's Avatar
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    Bumped again....
    Name: Eric Heims
    Red 2016 RTS, Diamond R Armrests, Ram X Mount, Doc Humphreys Dampener, BajaRon Swaybar, Spyderpops "Critter Splitter"


    "It is the common fate of the indolent to see their rights become a prey to the active. The condition upon which God hath given liberty to man is eternal vigilance; which condition if he break, servitude is at once the consequence of his crime and the punishment of his guilt." John Philpot Curran 1790



  9. #134
    Very Active Member Desert Spyder's Avatar
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    This is very good information. I passed it on to my chapter members of SRA.
    Happy Spyder Owner
    States visited on the Spyder.
    And if we live life without a passion, then we're not living.

  10. #135
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    Default Read the manual

    Quote Originally Posted by Illinois Boy View Post
    Do's & Do Not's for New Spyder Owners: Updated January 6th, 2013

    There are several "things" a Spyder owner needs to know when buying and operating their Spyder to help them have a better experience, and to avoid causing complications later. This is a collection of "sage-advice" gathered from various resources on Spyder Lover's and other sources to help you enjoy your experience with your Spyder; and to avoid "beginner mistakes" that may cause grief later-on. New recommendations and suggestions will be added as they are discovered. This list will include only issues for stock Spyders.


    READ THE MANUAL FRONT COVER TO THE BACK!!! The Spyder is fun and you are anxious to ride it; but do yourself a HUGE favor and read the manual entirely before doing so. You may be surprised at what you and your dealer do not know.


    Learn how your Spyder works. You do not have to become a mechanic, but having knowledge will help you out in more ways than can be mentioned. Spyderlovers.com is a good place to learn.


    Buy from a dealer with a good reputation. Setting-up a new Spyder seems to be a huge problem if not done correctly. Your odds of having a miserable experience increases if you don't.


    “Codes”; what are these? “Codes” are generated by the Spyder’s computer system (often referred to as the “Nanny” system). This system monitors many operations of your Spyder at any given time, and is highly sophisticated. This system can override many operations of your Spyder when it discovers it is exceeding its limits. It has been discovered by many to be sensitive to anything slightly “out of the ordinary”.
    When the “Nanny” discovers something more seriously wrong it can “throw a code” to let you know about it and may override your ability to operate the Spyder “normally”; or put your Spyder into the “Limp Mode”; which will limit what you can do with the Spyder, if anything at all. It is a safety system designed to help keep you safer; however it also can be a shock to anyone not aware of its existence. READ THE MANUAL about the system and where you can retrieve code definitions when they are generated on your screen.

    Retrieving Codes: (Provided by Nancy's Toys; as many of these suggestions are.)
    • Turn Ignition key to "ON"
    • Use "MODE" button to display total hours
    • Start engine and run until check engine light (or other fault indication) is displayed
    • Press and hold "MODE" button while pushing the "High Beam Flash" button rapidly five times (within 2 seconds)
    • The active faults will be displayed or "No Active Fault Code" will be shown
    • If you do not get a message, you didn't get the flash beams sequence done during the allotted time. Try again.


    Do not "ride the brake” or touch the brake when riding or cornering. Pay attention to whether you are doing this and stop-it!
    Too many people seem to have this bad-habit, and the Spyder doesn't like it. The "system" will begin to give you trouble. So blame yourself if you ride your brake -- period. It will cause you problems.


    SHIFTING:

    Shift and cruise at higher RPM's. Get over your fear of running the Spyder's Rotax engine at high RPM's. A properly maintained Rotax engine is designed to run at high RPM’s. For proof; the RTS SE5's "Trailer Mode" (with fully loaded trailer) won't let you shift out of 1st gear until you hit almost 28 MPH!

    Lugging the engine: Lugging occurs when having the Spyder in too-high of gear and too-low of RPM's while accelerating somewhat aggressively. Example: In 5th gear doing 50 MPH and deciding to accelerate to 65 quickly. You are likely going to lug the engine. Lugging results in knocking and vibrations beyond the norm. Lugging can be done in any gear between 2nd to 5th. Avoid accelerating in too high of a gear; while at a low RPM. Downshift first; or better yet... get used to running the engine at higher RPM's no matter what gear you are in.

    NOTE: The RTS-SE5's manual may confuse some on pages 71 and 76 where it mentions 3,000 RPM's as the "magic-number" to shift; and not to exceed 4,000 RPM's. This is references someone learning to ride the Spyder for the first time -- NOT the normal operating range.

    Clutch engagement: the Spyder's clutch is generally fully engaged when the RPM's are at 3500 or higher. Allowing your Spyder to run at RPM's lower than that for extended periods causes slippage in the clutch resulting in early wear on the unit. Most have found the best performance is realized when you keep the Spyder's RPM's above 4300 at any time while riding.
    Example: When shifting to the next higher gear at 5100 RPM's the next gear will engage and drop the RPM's to 4300. That is the range (4300 RPM’s) you want to stay above.

    Just because the Spyder has 5-gears does NOT mean you have to always use all of them. Apparently many assume they have to shift their Spyder up to 5th gear no matter how fast or slow they are going. You do not have to use all five gears every time you ride your Spyder.
    As an example: When cruising around town at 39 to 49 MPH you should never leave 3rd gear. You can cruise around between 39 - 49 MPH all day, and it is okay to do so. Shifting to 4th in that scenario will drop the RPM's below the 4300 range; which strains the Spyder's ability to perform at its best power-range; which diminishes the performance and enjoyment of your machine. In essence, you are robbing yourself of the full potential and enjoyment of your Spyder if you use too high of gears when they are not needed.


    Shifting-point suggestions for a RTS-SE5:


    1st to 2nd: shift when your speed is between 22 MPH and 29 MPH - no sooner.


    2nd to 3rd: shift when the RPM's are at 5,100 (which is at 39 MPH)


    3rd to 4th: shift when RPM's are at 5,100 (at 49 MPH)


    4th to 5th: shift to 5th when you reach 65 MPH on level terrain. You can ride all day in 4th between 49 MPH up to and including 65 MPH. (Some run at much higher RPM's than that.) If you are cruising in that speed-range, you do not need to use 5th gear. It is okay to do all day, for hours on end, and for as long as you own your Spyder. Simply resist shifting to 5th-gear in that range.
    NOTE: Cruising in 4th gear between 63-65 MPH will have the RPM's in the mid 5,000 RPM range -- which begins to put the engine in its better performance-range (more power) which is what you want! You will likely find your Spyder will run quieter, smoother, and still have power at the throttle in that RPM range, and the dreaded "belt-vibration" might not be a problem when you finally get used to the above suggestions. In a short sentence... you'll find a whole new machine if you operate it as suggested here.


    5th: Use only when the you are at a minimum of 65 MPH and on level terrain... and downshift on the hills. On hilly terrain, you'll need to upshift and downshift frequently to keep the Spyder's RPM's above 4300 RPM's at minimum. This is a good rule-of-thumb no matter what gear or speed you are traveling. Keep the RPM's above 4300! Do not let your Spyder lug it's way uphills! You should be treated so poorly for doing so!


    DO NOT roll-off the throttle when shifting with the SE5 system (read the manual, it is in there)! The manual states you do not have to roll-off the throttle when shifting SE5 models. If you follow the above shifting suggestions and do not roll-off the throttle, you will likely find your Spyder SE5 shifts very smoothly when doing so. Eventually, you'll become very good at shifting.


    Do not hold the shift-paddle for too long. There have been some having problems by resting their fingers on the paddle-shifter; which apparently can confuse the Spyder's system regarding what your intentions are. Its a good idea to get out of the habit if you are doing that before you experience problems (with the “system”).


    V-Twins motorcycle riders -- you are likely too used to your engine lugging along at 2,100 to 3,500 RPM's and expect your Spyder to do the same. You couldn’t be more wrong. That is a killer for the Spyder. Re-read the above information. The Rotax engine is NOT your old V-Twin. It works best at much higher RPM's; so get used to it for better performance and don't try to make it your old v-twin.


    Downshifting when stopping with the SE5 -- Most recommend downshifting manually -- especially when stopping fast. Some have found the Spyder may not downshift to 1st gear. You might then experience the dreaded "I can't get it into first-gear syndrome". Doesn't happen often... but when it does it is a "pain". No quick resolution if this happens... you just have to repeatedly try to get into first again. Eventually it should; while drivers honk at you for not moving!


    Simply believe what you just read about shifting and engine performance and do it. Your will discover an entirely different machine when you finally do so.


    Apply brake when starting the engine. Simply get into that habit. Too many new riders are finding themselves stranded with a Spyder that won't start; until they finally put their foot on the brake and find their Spyder starts right-up. (An SE5 Spyder requires pressure on the brake to start it unless you are in neutral. Many make sure it is in neutral before shutting the motor down. You don't have to do that, as the SE5 Spyder will go into neutral automatically when started while applying the brake.)


    Remove the key from the ignition (and the spare from the trunk) and walk away at least 15 feet for several minutes to allow the computer to reset itself if you have minor "booting" problems when starting. Some will say this doesn't work; while others say it will -- but all say doing this has been known to help to calm your nerves, which in that situation may be the best benefit of doing this.


    Tire pressure and shock-setting makes a big difference in how the Spyder handles. Tire pressure and shock setting depends on your load-weight, and type of riding, but there will be an optimal tire pressure and shock stiffness. Check these settings often.
    Front shock (manual) settings: A starting-point for the front (manually adjusted) shock setting is 4 or 5. Seems the stiffer the better for most -- especially if you are “loading” the Spyder (check the manual for load limits). Don't forget the RTS has a rear air-shock that can also be adjusted to your liking. (READ THE MANUAL)
    Tire pressure settings: Tire pressure preference varies, but a start is 18 pounds in the front tires and 28 pounds in the back tire. (The manual recommends 15-17 pounds for the front tire; and 28-30 for the rear tire
    (Some 2013 models have a new front-end design. No reports yet on what adjustments these may need, if any.)


    Check your battery cables, fuses, and such often. Anytime these get loose from vibration the Spyder acts badly.


    Pay attention to how your Spyder is running. If your Spyder is showing even the slightest sign of not running or operating right; check to be sure you are not guilty of doing, or are not doing any of the above. If not, then get your Spyder checked-out as soon as possible or risk having problems later -- possibly while on a trip.


    Check your windshield brackets often. They have been known to fail occasionally. Have them replaced if you notice any small cracks.


    Get a battery tender and hook it up to your battery in-between riding it. "Tenders" condition the battery which helps make a battery last longer and remain charged. Make sure what you get is a battery-tender for this purpose -- not a regular charger. (Short-rides do not always sufficiently charge your battery.)
    NOTE: Never, never, never loosen the negative jumper terminal connection or use it to ground an accessory! Doing so will make your day miserable. This issue has been well publicized on spyderlovers.com. You want to connect the battery-tender "pig-tails" to the actual battery terminal posts; NOT the jumper terminal connections. The following thread is one you can start with regarding this: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/showthread.php?33405-Who-s-the-FRIGGIN-IDIOT
    It is troublesome to remove the Tupperware to get to the actual battery terminals or other ground connections, but it is essential on the Spyder to do so. (The jumper terminal connections are the ones you can see when you lift your seat up.)


    Do not ride on gravel roads. Despite the fact you are on three-wheels -- you are also "belt-driven". Rocks and belts don't mix. Just simply avoid doing it whenever possible, and then check your belt right after doing so if you have to.


    Fluid levels (brake, oil, coolant) have to be correct. Check them often as your Spyder will not run right if they are not. (Brake fluid level will go lower as the brake-pads begin to wear due to the brake cylinder having to travel further to contact the pads to the rotors. While your brake-pads may still look good, your brake-fluid is now lower and the Spyder might throw a code for it; thus stopping your trip... while you scratch your head wondering why. Simply check the fluid as you add miles and top-it-off.)


    Be sure to relax your grip on the handlebars. People's first propensity is to squeeze the daylights out of the grips. This will make the Spyder skip from side-to-side causing a "jerky-ride" (lateral movement). JUST RELAX your grip, and you'll soon see that the Spyder's ride will have a reduction in its "jerkiness". Relaxing typically comes naturally after riding it for several hundred miles -- which is when you discover you need to let your body shift from the hips with the Spyder while keeping your upper torso steady. (For those who have been on a boat, you know what "sea-legs" are. This is the same, only your hips are the "legs".) However; remember, a Spyder will always have some lateral movement to it; which is only part of the thrill of riding one!


    V-Twin riders and other motorcyclists are the ones seemingly most affected by the lateral movement associated with the Spyder. They are just going to have to realize the Spyder is not a two-wheel v-twin and it is going to feel different. Also motorcycle riders need to "un-learn" counter-steering when riding a Spyder. It simply doesn't apply to a Spyder.


    Locking the glove box and handlebars: Many do not know you can lock the glove box when you lock the handlebars. (Shame on those that did not read the manual to know this!) When parked; turn the handlebars fully to the left or right (does not matter which direction), then turn the ignition-key one-quarter turn to the left (counter-clockwise) -- then pull the key directly out without turning it back to the right. (The key will have been in the 9-3 o'clock position when turned to the left.) Your glove box and handlebars are now locked. HINT: Be sure to be careful what you put into your glove box if it is sensitive to heat (from the engine); and if it might shift around to where it jams the glove box shut. If the glove box jams from something in it... try shaking the Spyder or moving the Spyder forward or backward in an attempt to move the contents to un-jam it. Sometimes simply taking a ride can be enough to move the contents to un-jam the glove box. Do not overfill the glove box either.


    Cruise Control Hint: Some find when disengaging the cruise control (by tapping the brakes slightly) the Spyder makes an abrupt slow-down. Some find it to be an "uncomfortable" feeling. To eliminate this all you have to do is slightly "roll-on" the throttle (as if slightly accelerating) before tapping the brakes. In doing so, the cruise control will disengage without the jerking motion of a slow-down. Practice this a couple times until you see how easy it is to solve this problem.

    FUEL OCTANE:

    My "common-sense" tells me not to enter into this subject here for fear of the endless debates and arguments it will cause; however I feel encouraged to do so based on the repeated questions about fuel. Fuel octane is second only to "oil-discussions"; and there are just about as many opinions as there are products.

    First-off; fuel octane does not indicate whether one is superior to another; as many believe it to be. In other words, 90 octane is not necessarily a superior fuel to 87 octane. It is simply different and designed for a specific use (engine). To save space on this list, I will not go into the details of why specific octane-ratings are recommended, or why you likely shouldn't make a decision to use an octane-rating other than what is recommended by an engine manufacturer. You can look at the links below to learn more about the details. There is more than enough information online to review.
    Try these links:

    http://www.eejitsguides.com/environm...el-octane.html

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cfhTTuxF6Mk

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octane_rating

    What you should know though, is that manufacturers do not just make-up an octane recommendation out of thin-air. Using a fuel of an octane-rating out of the recommended range can cause: Low performance, possible higher fuel consumption, and engine-knocking (damage being done). Your Spyder is an expensive vehicle. Think about it.

    Personally, I use 90+ octane, and avoid ethanol whenever possible -- although I will use 87 octane if it is the only option. My power is good, fuel consumption is just fine, and I do not have any "knocking". For me, the difference of a dollar or two per tank is not worth it for me. You can make your own judgement and choice.


    Fuel Recommendation in the Spyder Manual (2011 manual): Use unleaded gasoline or oxygenated fuel containing no more that 10% ethanol or methanol. The gasoline used must meet the following octane number:

    FUEL OCTANE RATING INSIDE NORTH AMERICA
    Recommended 91 (RON + MON)/2) - Minimum 87 (RON + MON)/2)
    Use premium unleaded fuel for optimum engine performance.


    FUEL OCTANE RATING OUTSIDE OF NORTH AMERICA

    Recommended 95 RON - Minimum 92 RON
    Use premium unleaded fuel for optimum engine performance.


    Lastly; be sure to have fun and ride often
    ... probably should be the #1 "MUST DO".

    i have read the manual. Attended the dealers you need to do the class. Picked the brain of the dealers service department. Paid attention to the forum.

    But you kind sir.. Explained it in a format that I understand. For that, I say "Thank You,"
    Bob Ledford, WA4IDI,(Retired, USA, MSG)
    Ormond Beach, FL, 32174
    2011 RTL SE-5, 2011 August


  11. #136
    Active Member spydermyke990's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grandpa Spyder View Post
    Nanny is what kicks in when you go around a curve or corner to fast and the wheel starts to come up. Then Nanny kicks in and slows you down to bring that wheel back down. I have had it happen to me a couple of times. It will throw you a little forward if you are not expecting it.
    Remember....nanny is watching you......

  12. #137
    Active Member Farmbanker's Avatar
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    Bump.
    Name: Eric Heims
    Red 2016 RTS, Diamond R Armrests, Ram X Mount, Doc Humphreys Dampener, BajaRon Swaybar, Spyderpops "Critter Splitter"


    "It is the common fate of the indolent to see their rights become a prey to the active. The condition upon which God hath given liberty to man is eternal vigilance; which condition if he break, servitude is at once the consequence of his crime and the punishment of his guilt." John Philpot Curran 1790



  13. #138
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    This is a great thread thanks for the tips I pickup my 2012 RT-S SE5 Sat. and I haven't owned a 2 wheeler for almost 30 years so hopefully no bad habits there. I've already read the online owners manual once and will read the hard copy again once I get my hands on it ( shoulda thought to get it when I closed the deal) thanks for sharing your knowledge.

  14. #139
    Very Active Member Cruzr Joe's Avatar
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    When you get time, go to the Home Page and on the right hand side is a "SPYDERS TO THE RESCUE" link, read it and if you can, join it. Print it out just before a trip out of your comfort zone.

    Cruzr Joe
    Last edited by Cruzr Joe; 03-18-2013 at 01:56 PM.
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  15. #140
    Registered Users carajony's Avatar
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    This is great,,, Thanx,, I am new and really didnt know most of this. I felt I had to shift to 5th gear all the time... I usually would shift to 5th when doing 40mph n higher.. Thanx again.. learn something new everyday... Def printing this out and keeping it on my spyder...

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    Default Bump!

    For the New ones in the Family!
    Kagey

    Do not mess in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.

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    - Baker Air Wings - SpyderPops BumpSkid

  17. #142
    Thinks out loud Jeriatric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kagey_98 View Post
    For the New ones in the Family!


    Identify what you have control over and find peace with what you don't.

  18. #143
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    Smile ***Brakes***

    Ok, so I took my bike in for service and was told that I am riding the brake and need to stop. Well I knew better, I wasn't riding the brake. I knew better because I rode with my right foot hooked under the brake pedal. What I found myself doing was pulling up on the brake A LOT!. Well you would think that would be OK but IT IS NOT!!! ANY TOUCHING OF THE BRAKE is engaging the brake. I went through a new pair of pads in a very short time before I figured out I was the problem. Now I just use the foot pegs like I should and only touch the brake to use it. Everything is great now.
    Money can buy a fine dog but only kindness will make him wag his tail~unknown


  19. #144
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    Default Bumpity Bump Bump Bump

    This needs to be on top and stay Sticky!!!! SO BUMP!

  20. #145
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    As a new Spyder owner and rider thank you very much for AWESOME information. You can find numerous complaints on-line from Spyder riders who probably are doing a lot of things wrong! I second the motion for a new Spyderlovers sub-heading specifically for new riders.

    I notice that much of what's written is slanted towards RT models, but it seems that most will translate to the RS.

    Thanks again to everyone for a great site.
    2012 Spyder RS SM5 - Steel Black Metallic "The Murder"
    Southern Cruisers Riding Club - Chapter 072 - Northern Illinois
    Two Brothers M2 Pipe; TB Juice Box; Hartco Custom Saddle; Rivco Driver Floorboards; Rivco Heel Toe Shifter; ESI Highway Pegs & Brackets; ESI 4.5" Easy Riser Handlebar Risers; BajaRon Sway Bar; Cycle Sounds Series 3 200 Watt Sound System; 14" Touring Windshield; Custom Dynamics Mirror Extensions; Kuryakyn ISO Grips; Kuryakyn Throttle Boss; Kuryakyn End Weights; Frunk Liner.




  21. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockwall View Post
    As a new Spyder owner and rider thank you very much for AWESOME information. You can find numerous complaints on-line from Spyder riders who probably are doing a lot of things wrong! I second the motion for a new Spyderlovers sub-heading specifically for new riders.

    I notice that much of what's written is slanted towards RT models, but it seems that most will translate to the RS.

    Thanks again to everyone for a great site.
    There is a slant to RT's... and for that I apologize. There are still items that fit all the models though, and hopefully one or more of them will provide a benefit and more enjoyment on one's Spyder.

    Ride safe, often and alert!

    SL #7026
    VBA #652
    HOG #3935417
    2011 Viper-Red Spyder RT SE5 & Trailer
    2017 HD Ultra Limited
    Former Rides: 2014 HD Ultra Limited; '04 Kawa Nomad; '09 HD Ultra-Classic; and many Hondas through the years.
    Spyder Newbies Do's & Do Not's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Spyder-owners

  22. #147
    GOS member (Girls On Spyders) Zenagirl's Avatar
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    Default Awsome Info and New Spyder Owner

    Quote Originally Posted by Rockwall View Post
    As a new Spyder owner and rider thank you very much for AWESOME information. You can find numerous complaints on-line from Spyder riders who probably are doing a lot of things wrong! I second the motion for a new Spyderlovers sub-heading specifically for new riders.

    I notice that much of what's written is slanted towards RT models, but it seems that most will translate to the RS.

    Thanks again to everyone for a great site.
    I agree, this is a super thread and the Do's and Don't and other info need to be easily accessible to new owners. I've read this several times and pick up something new each time, but I had a heck of a time finding it again to read the April 6th revision. (And I used the search function too!) Please put this where is it EASILY found by newbies.

  23. #148
    Very Active Member JkRbbt's Avatar
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    Now that I have a couple of hundred miles under my belt, I reread this list. Makes more sense. One question. With this being a hi rev-ing engine, do you experienced folks let the machine warm up before you take off? Usually I don't get into higher revs until everything is nice and toasty, but with this little fella, we are talking 3500 RPM just to keep the clutch fully engaged. I know. Ride it like you stole it!! But if I stole it I wouldn't have to pay for repairs!

  24. #149
    Very Active Member MRH's Avatar
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    It would just be so useful to take the advice from this thread, perhaps add another few posts from elsewhere, and put it where anybody new can easily access it on the site - I know it would have helped me. It tells you what you need to know, but don't even know to ask!

  25. #150
    Thinks out loud Jeriatric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JkRbbt View Post
    Now that I have a couple of hundred miles under my belt, I reread this list. Makes more sense. One question. With this being a hi rev-ing engine, do you experienced folks let the machine warm up before you take off? Usually I don't get into higher revs until everything is nice and toasty, but with this little fella, we are talking 3500 RPM just to keep the clutch fully engaged. I know. Ride it like you stole it!! But if I stole it I wouldn't have to pay for repairs!
    Always fire mine off and let it warm while I'm gearing up. If it's off the dead cold mark by a quarter or better then I'll slow roll it until it's running as warm as the ambient temp will allow.


    Identify what you have control over and find peace with what you don't.

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