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  1. #76
    Very Active Member napper39's Avatar
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    i know but too many new riders have not read this .

  2. #77
    Very Active Member Wiredux's Avatar
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    Default Sticky ????

    Is there a way that this can be made sticky? I have been looking for this thread and just finally found it. Lots of good info here.

  3. #78
    Very Active Member napper39's Avatar
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    bump this can help new riders so take it back to the top

  4. #79
    Very Active Member Netminder's Avatar
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    Copy and paste it to a word doc or notes(iPad users). That way you can have it on hand or print it. That is what I did as it is valuable info!

  5. #80
    Very Active Member Wiredux's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Netminder View Post
    Copy and paste it to a word doc or notes(iPad users). That way you can have it on hand or print it. That is what I did as it is valuable info!
    Great idea!

  6. #81
    Registered Users quickster47's Avatar
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    There is certainly some thorough, well thought out, sage advise in this thread. And being a new RT Limited owner it is very much appreciated.

    Carl

  7. #82
    Registered Users pickelhead's Avatar
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    The first bike I had was a Honda 350. You had to red line it to get power out of it, the brakes were so bad that if you used the fooot brake as a foot rest, when you needed it, Nada, zero, zip brakes. The last bike i had was a Honda VFR, Its power band was 4000 - 8000 rpm. It liked to be kept near red line. I had it in Europe, where when there were speed limits, they were more like suggestions. Before I even got my Spyder, I down loaded the owners manual and the PDF file showing all the different parts and system schematics. Very good information, but this thread should be included in the Owners Manual.

  8. #83
    Very Active Member napper39's Avatar
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    bump some cant find this so here it is

  9. #84
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    Default Great tips- and I have read the manual -----all the way and I don't own one yet!!!!

    Thank you for posting these for NEWBIES and as some say the OLDIES too. Great insight and tips!

    Believe it or not- this "NEWBIE" who doesn't even own a SPYDER RT (YET) has already read the complete owner's manual already.

    I also live on a gravel road and was thinking of getting a belt shield Thankfully I'd only have to go 2 miles TOPS on gravel! Still though that worries me- about belts and so forth.

    I also worry about the low ground clearance and fuel economy or lack thereof on this but also understand too it is almost 1000 pounds etc.

    Thanks again for the GREAT TIPS!

  10. #85
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    Question Thank you and a question?

    Thank you for this "Do and Do Not" list - its a GREAT tool for us newbies.

    I'm actually new to bikes, the Spyder being my first, so please excuse my ignorance, but I have a question........

    My Spyder is an RT Limited (LOVE IT!!) - since I didn't see that specific model listed in the "Do and Do Nots", is it safe to assume those things all apply to my bike too?


    Thank you!
    Crickett

  11. #86
    Thinks out loud Jeriatric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NurseCrickett View Post
    Thank you for this "Do and Do Not" list - its a GREAT tool for us newbies.

    I'm actually new to bikes, the Spyder being my first, so please excuse my ignorance, but I have a question........

    My Spyder is an RT Limited (LOVE IT!!) - since I didn't see that specific model listed in the "Do and Do Nots", is it safe to assume those things all apply to my bike too?


    Thank you!
    Crickett
    Short answer is Yes and a big Hi neighbor.


    Identify what you have control over and find peace with what you don't.

  12. #87
    Registered Users mcaccamise's Avatar
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    Cool Verry Helpful info for the nube!

    There is a wealth of knowledge here for me being a nube with only 300 miles on my RSS-SM5 i love it though its a big change from my past rides HD Touring.
    Getting used to shifting at higher rpms seems to be my biggest challenge keeping the revs above 5000 seems like the engine is screaming although it likes the higher rpms im learning
    and love the new experience on three wheels and being involved with a great group of knowledable people here Thanks for thhe Do"s and Donts its a great help and agreat read.
    Mike

  13. #88
    Registered Users TasmanianDevil's Avatar
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    This thread is a Tas saver. I didn't know anyone when I had my Tas delivered to my home. I had never ridden one. I have ridden mcs for 30+ years so I wasn't concerned UNTIL I READ THE MANUAL. After reading this, I spend hours soaking up the valuable knowledge un this site.
    Thanks so much, Sarah

  14. #89
    Active Member CWilber's Avatar
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    (RS-S Rider)
    Although on a Spyder you don't have to adhere to the two-wheeler rule of not braking in the curve, if you are making a left turn at a good speed, you should do so. All your weight is on your right foot and it is difficult to lift it to put it on the brake if you decide midway that you are going too fast.

    When riding somewhere like the Tail of the Dragon, if you really power out of the turn in 1st, that is when the stabilization system kicks in and you get the sensation that you are sliding. Better to be consistent through the turn.

    If you find that your fingers are going to sleep then you are either holding on too tight or your wrist is bent.

    If you add risers to your RS, you will probably want to also get mirror extensions as they place your hand right in the middle of the stock mirrors.

    Check out Lamont's IPS for your key.

    Most importantly, have fun and ride safe!

  15. #90
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    Default Riding the brakes

    I suspected that I was riding the right foot operated brake. To really find out if this was so I installed a bright blue LED on the dash on my SE5 GS and wired it in the circuit of the brake light. Anytime the foot brake is actuated the least little bit the LED turns on. I found that I was NOT riding the foot brake. It's an easy and low cost improvement. Arthur---Mexico City.

  16. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by CWilber View Post
    (RS-S Rider)
    Although on a Spyder you don't have to adhere to the two-wheeler rule of not braking in the curve, if you are making a left turn at a good speed, you should do so. All your weight is on your right foot and it is difficult to lift it to put it on the brake if you decide midway that you are going too fast.

    When riding somewhere like the Tail of the Dragon, if you really power out of the turn in 1st, that is when the stabilization system kicks in and you get the sensation that you are sliding. Better to be consistent through the turn.

    If you find that your fingers are going to sleep then you are either holding on too tight or your wrist is bent.

    If you add risers to your RS, you will probably want to also get mirror extensions as they place your hand right in the middle of the stock mirrors.

    Check out Lamont's IPS for your key.

    Most importantly, have fun and ride safe!
    Not disagreeing... You should always enter a corner with your machine set-up in the correct gear (preferably a lower one than what you approached the curve with so you have reserve power and the lower-gear can be used to decelerate some with a slight roll-off of the throttle without having to touch the brake); and at the right entry-speed to make sure you can negotiate the machine throughout it.

    Then apply power mid-curve to accelerate out of the remaining curve. (This is "generally" the teachings of rider/driver and safety courses for most vehicles.)

    On a Spyder, if you find you have not set-up correctly and are going too fast in a curve, you can apply brake in a corner... do so just enough to get the machine back in control -- and try not to do that twice. Otherwise try using a slight roll-off of the throttle first (assuming you entered the curve at a lower-gear than you approached the corner with.)

    However the reference to dragging the brake in the "Do's & Do Not's" is in regard to those who keep their foot on the brake constantly or are prone to "tapping" their brakes constantly. That is a very bad habit no matter what the vehicle is. (Unless you are a professional rider who knows exactly what they are doing with their brakes and the pressure they are applying at any moment. Most of us are not professionals though; at least not as much as one's ego might want to believe we are.)

    Dragging the brake in a curve on a Spyder can especially confuse it; since you are turning, accelerating, and braking at the same time. The machine doesn't know what the heck you are asking it to do... and may let you know it doesn't like it someday.

    SL #7026
    VBA #652
    HOG #3935417
    2011 Viper-Red Spyder RT SE5 & Trailer
    2017 HD Ultra Limited
    Former Rides: 2014 HD Ultra Limited; '04 Kawa Nomad; '09 HD Ultra-Classic; and many Hondas through the years.
    Spyder Newbies Do's & Do Not's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Spyder-owners

  17. #92
    Active Member smoky's Avatar
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    Default Do read...

    I have never seen a better set of "to do and not" rules...BRP should incorporate this into all Spyder operator's manuals...I know...some of it's already there but this is worded so well....smoky

  18. #93
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    Glad you thought it would help...

    As it says... this information has been taken from advice given by some of the more experienced Spyder owners, and some of my own experience.

    We'll keep adding to it as we move along...

    SL #7026
    VBA #652
    HOG #3935417
    2011 Viper-Red Spyder RT SE5 & Trailer
    2017 HD Ultra Limited
    Former Rides: 2014 HD Ultra Limited; '04 Kawa Nomad; '09 HD Ultra-Classic; and many Hondas through the years.
    Spyder Newbies Do's & Do Not's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Spyder-owners

  19. #94
    Very Active Member chris56's Avatar
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    last small thing .. if you use the cruise control on higher speed
    and touch the brakes - also just a little - the system will switch off the cruise control - when the throttle is on zero the engine will produce a strong brake .. my girl hates that
    Ryker 900 - Fox-shock - TOYO - larger shield - 2up & a topace

  20. #95
    Active Member jmstiffany's Avatar
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    Default Gravel Roads

    Quote Originally Posted by ARCTIC View Post
    Here's one that I didn't know as I had never been around motorcycles or spyders:

    DO NOT RIDE IT DOWN GRAVEL ROADS

    I took it to the gravel road 1st day I owned it. Thought it'd be a good place to ride it and get used to the handling without traffic. 3 wheels on the ground would make you think it's perfect for gravel cruising. I pushed a rock into my belt. Since then, I've added the spyderpops guard
    That is kind of hard to do when you live on a gravel road. I have 1 1/2 miles of gravel that i ride on almost every day.

  21. #96
    Very Active Member StanProff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grandpa Spyder View Post
    Nanny is what kicks in when you go around a curve or corner to fast and the wheel starts to come up. Then Nanny kicks in and slows you down to bring that wheel back down. I have had it happen to me a couple of times. It will throw you a little forward if you are not expecting it.
    The Nanny has saved me from embarressment more that a couple of times. Your riding method can cause it to kick in a little sooner at times. I have found that a smooth exit around a corner while applying the throttle is less likely to cause the nanny to kick in as opposed to hitting the throttle a little two hard in the middle of the curve. All in all I think it has saved my butt a couple of times in the twisties and I am glad to have the nanny on board with me. I think it is good to get in a large parking lot and practice going in circles etc. and get used to the feel of the nanny so you know what to expect if she kicks in. In normal non-agressive riding you may never have it kick in.
    Happy Spyderlovers

  22. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by Illinois Boy View Post
    Do's & Do Not's for New Spyder Owners: Updated Sept 29th, 2012
    There are several "things" a Spyder owner needs to know when buying and operating their Spyder to help them have a better experience, and to avoid causing complications later. That is a collection of "sage-advice" gathered from various resources on Spyder Lover's and other sources to help you enjoy your experience with your Spyder; and to avoid "beginner mistakes" that may cause grief later-on. If anyone has suggestions to add to the list... please do.

    READ THE MANUAL
    FRONT COVER TO THE BACK!!! The Spyder is fun and you are anxious to ride it; but do yourself a HUGE favor and read the manual entirely before doing so. You may be surprised at what you and your dealer do not know.

    Learn how your Spyder works.
    You do not have to become a mechanic, but having knowledge will help you out in more ways than can be mentioned. Spyderlovers.com is a good place to learn.

    Buy from a dealer with a good reputation.
    Setting-up a new Spyder seems to be a huge problem if not done correctly. Your odds of having a miserable experience increases if you don't.

    Do not "ride the brake”
    or touch the brake when riding or cornering. Pay attention to whether you are doing this and stop-it!
    Too many people seem to have this bad-habit, and the Spyder doesn't like it. The "system" will begin to give you trouble. So blame yourself if you ride your brake -- period. It will cause you problems.

    SHIFTING:

    Shift and cruise at higher RPM's.
    Get over your fear of running the Spyder's Rotax engine at high RPM's. A properly maintained Rotax engine is designed to run at high RPM’s. For proof; the RTS SE5's "Trailer Mode" won't let you shift out of 1st gear until you hit 28 MPH!

    Lugging the engine: Lugging occurs when having the Spyder in too-high of gear and too-low of RPM's while accelerating somewhat aggressively. Example: In 5th gear doing 50 MPH and deciding to accelerate to 65 quickly. You are likely going to lug the engine. Lugging results in knocking and vibrations beyond the norm. Lugging can be done in any gear between 2nd to 5th. Avoid accelerating in too high of a gear; while at a low RPM. Downshift first; or better yet... get used to running the engine at higher RPM's no matter what gear you are in.

    The RTS-SE5's manual may confuse some on pages 71 and 76 where it mentions 3,000 RPM's as the "magic-number" to shift; and not to exceed 4,000 RPM's. This is in reference to someone learning to ride the Spyder for the first time -- NOT the normal operating range.

    Clutch engagement:
    the Spyder's clutch is generally fully engaged when the RPM's are at 3500 or higher. Allowing your Spyder to run at RPM's lower than that for extended periods causes slippage in the clutch resulting in early wear on the unit. Most have found the best performance is realized when you keep the Spyder's RPM's above 4300 at any time while riding. Example: When shifting to the next higher gear at 5100 RPM's the next gear will engage and drop the RPM's to 4300. That is the range you want to stay above.

    Just because the Spyder has 5-gears does NOT mean you have to always use all of them.
    Apparently many assume they have to shift their Spyder up to 5th gear no matter how fast or slow they are going. You do not have to use all five gears if you are cruising around town at 35 to 47 MPH as an example. In that scenario you should never leave 3rd gear if you are cruising around between 35 - 47 MPH; and it is OK to do that all day. Shifting to 4th in that scenario will drop the RPM's below the 4300 range and puts strain on the Spyder's ability to perform at its best power-range -- which diminishes the performance of your machine. In essence, you are robbing yourself of the full potential and enjoyment of your Spyder if you use too high of gears when they are not needed.

    Shifting-point suggestions for a RTS-SE5:


    1st to 2nd: shift when your speed is between 22 MPH and 28 MPH - no sooner.

    2nd to 3rd: shift when the RPM's are at 5,100

    3rd to 4th: shift when RPM's are at 5,100 (at 47-48 MPH)

    4th to 5th: shift to 5th when you reach 65 MPH on level terrain. You can ride all day in 4th between 47 MPH up to and including 65 MPH. (Some run at much higher RPM's than that.) If you are cruising in that speed-range, you do not need to use 5th gear -- and that is OK to do all day for hours on end and for as long as you own your Spyder. Resist shifting to 5th-gear in that range. Cruising in 4th gear between 63-65 MPH will have the RPM's in the mid 5,000 RPM range -- which begins to put the engine in its better performance-range (more power) which is what you want! You will likely find your Spyder will run quieter, smoother, and still have power at the throttle in that RPM range, and the dreaded "belt-vibration" might not be a problem when you finally get used to the above suggestions. In a short sentence... you'll find a whole new machine if you operate it as suggested here.

    5th: Use only when the you are at a minimum of 65 MPH and on level terrain.... and downshift on hills. On hilly terrain, you'll need to upshift and downshift frequently to keep the Spyser's RPM's above 4300 RPM's at minimum. This is a good rule-of-thumb no matter what gear or speed you are traveling. Keep the RPM's above 4300! Do not let your Spyder lug it's way uphills! You should be treated so poorly for doing so!

    DO NOT roll-off the throttle when shifting with the SE5 system (read the manual)! Too many ask and debate this subject; which clearly shows they have NOT read the manual if they suggest rolling-off the throttle. Shame on you! Read the manual -- which is step one!

    Do not hold the shift-paddle for too long. There have been some having problems by resting their fingers on the paddle-shifter; which apparently can confuse the Spyder's system as to what you are doing. Probably a good idea to get out of that habit if you are doing that before you experience problems.

    Downshift when stopping with the SE5 -- especially fast stops. Some have found the Spyder may not downshift to 1st gear. You might then experience the dreaded "I can't get it into first-gear syndrome". Doesn't happen often... but when it does it is a "pain". No quick resolution if this happens... you just have to repeatedly try to get into first again. Eventually it should; while drivers honk at you for not moving!

    Apply brake when starting the engine.
    Simply get into that habit. Too many new riders are finding themselves stranded with a Spyder that won't start; until they finally put their foot on the brake and find their Spyder starts right-up. (An SE5 Spyder requires pressure on the brake to start it unless you are in neutral. Many make sure it is in neutral before shutting the motor down. You don't have to do that, as the SE5 Spyder will go into neutral automatically when started while applying the brake.

    V-Twins motorcycle riders -- you guys are too used to your engine lugging along at 2,100 to 3,500 RPM's. That is a killer for the Spyder. Re-read the above information. The Rotax engine is NOT your old V-Twin. It works best at much higher RPM's; so get used to it for better performance and don't try to make it your old v-twin.

    Simply believe what you just read about shifting and engine performance
    and do it. Your will discover an entirely different machine when you finally do so.

    Remove the key from the ignition (and the spare from the trunk) and walk away at least 15 feet for several minutes to allow the computer to reset itself if you have minor "booting" problems when starting. Some will say this doesn't work; while others say it will -- but all say doing this has been known to help to calm your nerves, which in that situation may be the best benefit of doing this.

    Tire pressure and shock-setting makes a big difference in how the Spyder handles. Both tire pressure and shock setting depends on your load-weight, and type of riding, but there will be an optimal tire pressure and shock stiffness. Don't forget the RTS has a rear air-shock that can also be adjusted to your liking. (READ THE MANUAL) Check these settings often. A starting-point for shock setting is 4 or 5. Seems the stiffer the better for most. Tire pressure preference varies also, but a start is 18-20 lbs. in the front tires and 28 lbs. in the back tire. (The 2013 ST and RT's appear to have a new front-end design. No reports yet on what adjustments these may need, if any.)

    Check your battery cables, fuses, and such often. Anytime these get loose from vibration... the Spyder acts badly.

    Pay attention to how your Spyder is running. If your Spyder is showing even the slightest sign of not running or operating right... check to be sure you are not guilty of doing, or are not doing any of the above. If not, then get it checked-out as soon as possible or risk having problems later -- possibly while on a trip.

    Check your windshield brackets often. They have been known to fail occasionally. Have them replaced if you notice any small cracks.

    Get a battery tender and hook it up to your battery in-between riding it. "Tenders" condition the battery which helps make a battery last longer and remain charged. Make sure what you get is a battery-tender for this purpose -- not a regular charger. (Short-rides do not always sufficiently charge your battery.)

    Do not ride on gravel roads. Despite the fact you are on three-wheels... you are also "belt-driven". Rocks and belts don't mix. Just simply avoid doing it whenever possible, and then check your belt right after doing so if you have to.

    Fluid levels (i.e., brake, oil, coolant) have to be correct. Check them often as your Spyder will not run right if they are not. (Brake fluid level will go lower as the brake-pads begins to wear due to the brake cylinder traveling further to contact the pads to the rotors. While your brake-pads may still look good, your brake-fluid is now lower and the Spyder might throw a code for it; thus stopping your trip... while you scratch your head wondering why. Simply check the fluid as you add miles and top-it-off.)

    Be sure to relax your grip on the handlebars. People's first propensity is to squeeze the daylights out of the grips. This will make the Spyder skip from side-to-side causing a "jerky-ride" (lateral movement). JUST RELAX your grip, and you'll soon see that the Spyder's ride will have a reduction in its "jerkiness". Relaxing typically comes naturally after riding it for several hundred miles. However; remember, a Spyder will always have some lateral movement to it; which is only part of the thrill of riding one!
    V-Twin riders and other motorcyclists are the ones seemingly most affected by the lateral movement associated with the Spyder. They are just going to have to realize the Spyder is not a two-wheel v-twin and it is going to feel different. Also motorcycle riders need to "un-learn" counter-steering when riding a Spyder. It simply doesn't apply to a Spyder.

    Be sure to have fun and ride often... probably should be the #1 "MUST DO".
    Great info, thanks much

  23. #98
    Very Active Member napper39's Avatar
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    too good yo let it go back to the bottem so bumpbump

  24. #99
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    Default Norton

    Quote Originally Posted by napper39 View Post
    yiks oh yeh here i am with my 2cents,rember check your battery cable often it vibrates loose,and a loose cable can be a night mare,check your fusess and relays they vibrate loose,and thats a very bad thing.so lets say you dont chsck these things,you have trouble on the road wont run so you have it towed to a dealer they push in the relay or tighten up the battery cable.if you would have done these things you would not have had to wait for that tow truck,or had the dealer tell you i pushed in that relay and your good to go.so do these things and you might never have any trouble with your spyder ever. have fun and ride like the wind. i do.
    Miss my 1970 Comando.

  25. #100
    Active Member Navy Warrant's Avatar
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    Default break-in period

    Getting my RT-S SE5 in a coupla days. Trying to learn as much as possible in the mean time. Any thoughts or advice about the break-in period?
    [/IMG]



    2012 RT-S SE5, Pure Magnesium Metallic (traded in)
    2015 RT LTD SE6, Red Pearl, Ultra Comfort Seat
    MODS: shorty antenna, BajaRon sway bar, Air Hawk cushion, custom LED US flag, custom Sue Hopper painted SPECOPS hood logo, custom Combat Craft Crewman windshield engraving, cup holder, Doc Humphry's 2017 complete RT kit belt tensioner



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