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  1. #251
    Very Active Member IdahoMtnSpyder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike5511 View Post
    P.S. Can you buy a service manual for the Spyder?
    Your best bet quality wise is to buy the printed manual through the dealer, but that's also the most pricey way. Whoever the official producer of the Can Am manuals is, they apparently do not make a PDF copy available for sale. I really believe the PDF copies that are sold on the 'net are not legitimate, but the manufacturers must not care too much as the guys seem to stay in business, or else they're based in a foreign country somewhere where BRP can't reach them. The 2013 RT manual I got from Best Manuals is complete and is searchable. However, the images in the parts manual section suck. Resolution is quite poor. I usually end up going to the BRP parts website to get a good copy of a parts diagram. The price is right, about $30.

    2014 Copper RTS

    Tri-Axis bars, CB, BajaRon sway bar & shock adjusters, SpyderPop's Bumpskid, NBV peg brackets, LED headlights and modulator, Wolo trumpet air horns, trailer hitch, custom trailer harness, high mount turn signals, Custom Dynamics brake light, LED turn signal lights on mirrors, LED strip light for a dash light, garage door opener, LED lights in frunk, trunk, and saddlebags, RAM mounts and cradles for tablet (for GPS) and phone (for music), and Smooth Spyder belt tensioner.

  2. #252
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    Default Here is another "Do" Have a reliable trailer!

    Check out these amazing "Ride On Trailers" There are no ramps and it lowers to the ground. This is perfect for my Can-am! Can't live without it!!

  3. #253
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    Default Prospective Buyer

    We are planning on buying a new RT-S SE6. We have been reading up on the forums and find the information both interesting and distressing. We would like to ride from Southern California to Alaska on this after proper break in and sufficient time getting acquainted with it. We rented a 2010 version for a week and found it to be fun and useful after adjusting to its "nanny". Does anyone have experience riding the AlCan and the Cassier Highway on a Can-Am? The AlCan is paved the entire way and the Cassier is not. From the Do's and Don't"s section, it would seem, the Spyder may be a little too delicate for this adventure. I know a lot of Harley's ride these highways and they are belt driven, so I am hoping it is just an over abundance of caution regarding the warning. I would like to know of people riding to Alaska and their experience. I am an Ironbutt rider with 40 years of riding experience.
    Thanks,
    Santa Ken

  4. #254
    Very Active Member IdahoMtnSpyder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Santa Ken View Post
    We are planning on buying a new RT-S SE6. We have been reading up on the forums and find the information both interesting and distressing. We would like to ride from Southern California to Alaska on this after proper break in and sufficient time getting acquainted with it. We rented a 2010 version for a week and found it to be fun and useful after adjusting to its "nanny". Does anyone have experience riding the AlCan and the Cassier Highway on a Can-Am? The AlCan is paved the entire way and the Cassier is not. From the Do's and Don't"s section, it would seem, the Spyder may be a little too delicate for this adventure. I know a lot of Harley's ride these highways and they are belt driven, so I am hoping it is just an over abundance of caution regarding the warning. I would like to know of people riding to Alaska and their experience. I am an Ironbutt rider with 40 years of riding experience.
    Thanks,
    Santa Ken
    Check out this thread and maybe become part of the group! http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...ht=alaska+2015

    2014 Copper RTS

    Tri-Axis bars, CB, BajaRon sway bar & shock adjusters, SpyderPop's Bumpskid, NBV peg brackets, LED headlights and modulator, Wolo trumpet air horns, trailer hitch, custom trailer harness, high mount turn signals, Custom Dynamics brake light, LED turn signal lights on mirrors, LED strip light for a dash light, garage door opener, LED lights in frunk, trunk, and saddlebags, RAM mounts and cradles for tablet (for GPS) and phone (for music), and Smooth Spyder belt tensioner.

  5. #255
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    As already noted, some of us are planning to go to Alaska next July. I hope you can join us!
    PrairieSpyder (Patti)

  6. #256
    Velvet Hammer akspyderman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Santa Ken View Post
    We are planning on buying a new RT-S SE6. We have been reading up on the forums and find the information both interesting and distressing. We would like to ride from Southern California to Alaska on this after proper break in and sufficient time getting acquainted with it. We rented a 2010 version for a week and found it to be fun and useful after adjusting to its "nanny". Does anyone have experience riding the AlCan and the Cassier Highway on a Can-Am? The AlCan is paved the entire way and the Cassier is not. From the Do's and Don't"s section, it would seem, the Spyder may be a little too delicate for this adventure. I know a lot of Harley's ride these highways and they are belt driven, so I am hoping it is just an over abundance of caution regarding the warning. I would like to know of people riding to Alaska and their experience. I am an Ironbutt rider with 40 years of riding experience.
    Thanks,
    Santa Ken
    RE: Alcan and Cassier Highways. Both are paved but you may run into construction areas and encounter some graveled areas. Pretty much a given any time you ride the Great North. I avoid gravel if I can (but am considered very conservative). If you pick up a rock and your drive belt gets broken, you are in a bit of doo doo. The glacial till on gravel roads also can gum up your brake actuator and cause limp mode if you don't keep it clean. Tows if needed can take hours or more. The cost is also way out there. I have heard up to $50 per mile for very remote tows.

    The Milepost magazine is recommended reading and will take a bunch of mystery out the ride. The current year is a must. 2015 was not out yet as of last week.

    There is a group planning a trip next season from Chelen, WA to Alaska.
    Last edited by akspyderman; 11-01-2014 at 03:41 PM.

    Currently Owned: 2011 RT A&C SE5 (magnesium), 2014 RTS-SE6 (yellow), 2015 Vulcan 900 LTD

    Previously : 2008 GS-SM5 (silver), 2009 RS-SE5 (red), 2010 RT-S Premier Editon #474 (black) Pictures of 2008 and 2009 Spyders are in Alaska Albums 2009 and 2010.
    5 Spyders, 10 years, 145,375 miles


  7. #257
    Active Member Spyda98's Avatar
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    Default Great Info

    Great info for a new Spyder owner like myself. Thanks!!

  8. #258
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    Default Miles per tank

    I just got my 2014 r s and see that the gas tank is 6.2 gal.
    Question is " About how far can my R S go on a tank full ? "I ride in the hills above Ventura Ca. from sea level to 5000 feet. I know that the Can Am gets not great mileage doing that --but I was thinking about taking it to Las Vegas this spring. I know that I will have to stop for gas at least once or twice but some parts of the ride the gas stations are a little far apart. I have a gal gas can that I could put in the frunt, along with a carry on bag

    So far love the bike and my friend is thinking about a F-3 when they come out .
    Thanks for any help.

  9. #259
    Very Active Member kep-up's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by olderman View Post
    I just got my 2014 r s and see that the gas tank is 6.2 gal.
    Question is " About how far can my R S go on a tank full ? "I ride in the hills above Ventura Ca. from sea level to 5000 feet. I know that the Can Am gets not great mileage doing that --but I was thinking about taking it to Las Vegas this spring. I know that I will have to stop for gas at least once or twice but some parts of the ride the gas stations are a little far apart. I have a gal gas can that I could put in the frunt, along with a carry on bag

    So far love the bike and my friend is thinking about a F-3 when they come out .
    Thanks for any help.
    I get about 30mpg with my 2011 RS-S. You can figger it out from there.

  10. #260
    Registered Users angelssix's Avatar
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    I wish I had read this thread earlier! I am guilty of rolling off the throttle, the brake issue has never been a problem for me. So I can shift up without letting off the throttle? I don't remember reading that in my manual, but I am going to go back and read it again.

    ETA: I just looked at my manual. It is mentioned in the section regarding practice exercises for the SE6. It is on page 86 of the 2014 owners manual, under 7b) Upshifting from First into Second Gear. It mentions that you do not have to release the throttle to shift, which is NOT that same thing as DO NOT. Yes, I know I am arguing semantics......
    Last edited by angelssix; 02-02-2015 at 10:17 AM. Reason: added info from owner's manual

  11. #261
    Very Active Member vondalyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by angelssix View Post
    I wish I had read this thread earlier! I am guilty of rolling off the throttle, the brake issue has never been a problem for me. So I can shift up without letting off the throttle? I don't remember reading that in my manual, but I am going to go back and read it again.

    ETA: I just looked at my manual. It is mentioned in the section regarding practice exercises for the SE6. It is on page 86 of the 2014 owners manual, under 7b) Upshifting from First into Second Gear. It mentions that you do not have to release the throttle to shift, which is NOT that same thing as DO NOT. Yes, I know I am arguing semantics......
    Don't roll off the throttle when upshifting. Think of it from the computer's point of view: you're dropping RPMs while telling it to upshift -- conflicting message. Just GO with the throttle and upshift as you move through higher RPMs.

  12. #262
    Active Member Clary's Avatar
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    Default New owner here

    Thanks for all the info posted here. I will apply it all on my first ride . Thanks
    Quote Originally Posted by Illinois Boy View Post
    “Do's & Do Not's” for New Spyder Owners:
    Updated December 28th, 2014

    This information is for both the 900 and 1330 series engines and will be indicated when something applies specifically to one or the other.

    There are several "things" a Spyder owner needs to know when buying and operating their Spyder to help them have a better experience, and to avoid causing complications later.

    This is a collection of "sage-advice" gathered from various resources on Spyder Lover's and other reliable sources to help you enjoy your experience with your new Spyder; and to avoid "beginner mistakes" that may cause grief later-on.

    Realize what you are buying:
    More and more new Spyder owners have not had any experience with "sport-vehicles", such as motorcycles and such. If you are new to this, then welcome to a new experience for you!

    However, you must realize a few things are going to happen that are just simply part of owning and riding sport-vehicles.


    Do not try to make your Spyder what it is not! Your Spyder is...
    Exhilarating (A Spyder gets you out of the house and car and into the outdoors, so enjoy it!)
    Windy (Do not try to hide behind your windshield.)
    Hot (You are sitting on top of a motor, so expect it to be! All new motorcycles and recreation vehicles run hotter than in the past.)
    A high revving machine (900 series engine models only.)

    Purchase your Spyder from a dealer with a good reputation:
    Endless future problems appear to stem from purchases and service from poor dealers. Do your homework on the dealer you are buying from. Check around to see if others have had good experiences with the dealer; both with the sales and service departments. If you are considering a used Spyder be sure to look at the maintenance records, and be sure it has been thoroughly inspected. Be sure the computer updates and recalls have been done. (This may not have occurred when an individual is selling one. A dealership should be able to tell if the system has been updated and all recalls completed.)

    Check on Spyderlovers.com to see what others say.

    READ THE MANUAL FRONT COVER TO THE BACK!!!
    You are excited to ride however do yourself a HUGE favor and read the manual entirely before doing so. You may be surprised what you (and possibly your dealer) may learn. Frequently questions are asked on Spyderlover.com that are answered in the manual.

    GENERAL INFORMATION:

    Learn how your Spyder works:
    You do not have to become a mechanic, but having knowledge will help you out in more ways than can be mentioned. Spyderlovers.com is a good place to learn.

    Missing vent:
    There never was a right-side vent for models up to 2014. Increasing airflow is the official reason from BRP.
    The 2014 RTS 1330 model does have vent covers on both sides, due to changes made to the cooling system.

    Toolkit:
    It is underneath your seat, unless you have an RSS or STS -- then the tool kit is in the Frunk (Front Trunk) mounted on the right side. Read your manual!


    "Humming Sound" after turning the key off:
    You will hear a humming sound for about 30-45 minutes after turning-off 2012-13 Spyders. This is normal and mentioned in the manual -- not to worry about it. Pre-2012's have some humming, but it appears not to last as long as on the '12's and '13's. (It is in your manual.) No information yet regarding the 2014 RTS model, but from information received, you will not likely hear the humming-sound.

    Locking the glove box and handlebars:
    When parked; turn the handlebars fully to the left or right (does not matter which direction), then turn the ignition-key one-quarter turn to the left (counter-clockwise) -- then pull the key directly out without turning it back to the right. (The key will have been in the 9-3 o'clock position when turned to the left.) Your glove box and handlebars are now locked. CAUTION: Avoid putting heat-sensitive items in your glove box. Also avoid over-stuffing or items that may shift and jam the glove box shut. If the glove box jams from something in it... try shaking the Spyder or moving the Spyder forward or backward to move the contents to un-jam it. Sometimes simply taking a ride can be enough to move the contents to un-jam the glove box. A better idea is simply to not overfill the glove box.


    “NANNY & CODES”; WHAT ARE THESE: (Overall, this still applies to the 1330 model. Read your manual.)
    The Spyder’s operations are controlled by a computer system, affectionately referred to as the “Nanny”. The Nanny monitors your Spyder when running for safety purposes and is extremely sensitive to anything operating out of its designed limits.
    When it senses something wrong it may affect the operation of your Spyder by applying system controls. (i.e., brakes, stability control, and etc.)
    When serious problems are detected by the “Nanny system” you will see your check-engine light (an orange dash-screen).
    When this happens, the Nanny may override your ability to operate the Spyder “normally”; or put your Spyder into the “Limp Mode”, which may not allow it to operate at all.

    LIMP-MODE:
    Limp-mode is a precautionary feature of the “Nanny-system” whereby it will only allow operation within a narrow-band of performance. It is designed to prevent further damage to the vehicle, and get you to a safe place, or to a dealer if possible. (i.e., reduced speed function). Read your manual about Limp-Mode.
    WARNING: The Limp-Mode can kick-in while riding your Spyder and slow it down suddenly and substantially (below highway speeds). Be sure to exit the road immediately to a safe location if this happens.

    ORANGE SCREEN:
    This occurs when the system discovers a potential problem. Many potential issues can cause the Orange-Screen to appear. Read further...

    CODES: Codes are generated by the "system" when a problem occurs to help technicians diagnose a potential problem. When the "orange screen" is showing, you can find out if there is a “code” generated by the computer to identify the problem. If you do not see the screen, try to reproduce the problem until you get the screen again. If you cannot reproduce the screen, you may likely be able to continue to ride, however you may want to cut your trip short if you do not know what caused the screen warning.
    To reference the problem(s) associated with the various codes you need a Maintenance & Repair Manual; which is not provided upon the purchase of a Spyder -- however, the code-number remains stored in the Spyder's system for your dealer-technician. You do not have to worry if you do not have the manual or cannot retrieve the code. Just get your Spyder to a dealer and they will find the code generated.
    If you can retrieve the code; write it down and post it on spyderlovers.com, someone will likely be able to look-up the code and its related problem. This is highly recommended, so you know what you are dealing with.
    Footnote: The "system" keeps a record in memory of the functions of your Spyder to include your speeds, rpm's and more. So, if you are abusing your Spyder, the computer's records will let your technician know.

    Code List (for printing): (provided by Ottawa-rider)
    You can find a PDF-file list of the codes and their meaning to print and carry with you when riding. Look for post #6 from member Ottawa-Rider: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...oftware-Update

    Code Reference App for Smart Phones:
    (APPS are created, and maintained by Rattigan Roger):
    Spydercodes for Android at Googleplay
    Myspyder for I-Phones at the Apple download site


    RETRIEVING CODES:


    RS: (Provided by NancysToys.)
    1. Turn Ignition key to "ON"
    2. Push the "MODE" button to display total hours screen. Start engine and run until check engine light (or other fault indication) is displayed.
    3. Press and hold "MODE" button while pushing the "High Beam Flash" button rapidly five times (within 2 seconds).
    4. The active faults will be displayed or "No Active Fault Code" will be shown.
    5. If you do not get a message, you didn't get the flash beams sequence done during the allotted time. Try again.
    6. Jot the code-number down and check the list in the manual to determine your problem. Share this with your mechanic.
    RT & ST: (RT provided by Jerbear / ST by Billybovine)
    1. Turn Ignition key to "ON" and wait for the multifunction gauge to complete its self-test.
    2. Push the "MODE" "SET" & "Turn Signal" buttons at the same time. (Push all three straight in.) If there was a code generated, you will see it on your screen. You might want to try it a couple times to make sure you pushed the three buttons at the same time.

    2014 RTS: (Provided by MRH)
    Retrieving codes on the 2014 is close to the same as other RT model years, except it works best to first hold the mode and set button, and then activate the turn signal button.

    Clarification on the P0127 and P0217 code messages: (From Steve with BRP customer care) Some have experienced the P0127 and/or P0217 codes on their Spyders so we'd like to provide additional information on what they mean. The following is the link to this thread started by Steve, from BRP Customer Care: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...P0217-messages

    RIDING TIPS (All models and years):

    JUST RELAX YOUR GRIP!!
    People's propensity is to squeeze the daylights out of the grips. This will make the Spyder skip from side-to-side causing a "jerky-ride" (lateral movement); which is the first comment heard by new riders.
    Relax your grip and you'll soon see the Spyder's ride will have a reduction in its "jerkiness".
    Relaxing typically comes naturally after riding it for several hundred miles. However; remember, a Spyder will always have some lateral movement to it; which is only part of the thrill of riding one!
    Check tire pressure if you feel there is still too much lateral movement or a lack of steering control after relaxing your grip.
    Some Spyders have alignment issues; do have it checked, or see one of the new “Laser Alignment” specialists that are sponsors on Spyderlovers.com. Others have improved their Spyder’s control with various after-market suspension, sway bars, and etc. Look for the sponsors of Spyderlovers.com for solutions to your needs.

    NOTE MOTORCYCLISTS: Motorcyclists are seemingly most affected by the lateral movement associated with the Spyder. They are just going to have to realize the Spyder is not a two-wheel vehicle and it is going to feel different. Also motorcycle riders need to "unlearn" counter-steering when riding a Spyder. It simply doesn't apply to a Spyder.

    CORNERING:
    Read the manual and follow the suggestions. Lean toward the handlebar closest to the inside of the corner. (Right-bar on right turns; left-bar on left turns.) This shifts your weight on the machine and also puts your head slightly lower to the center of gravity; causing you to have less of the lateral-pull associated with cornering with a Spyder.
    Use your knees on the sides of the seat to help secure yourself on tight-fast corners.
    Your passenger can lean some also if they wish; however they should hang onto their grab-rails in corners.
    Read the Motorcycle Safety Foundation’s guide on cornering a motorcycle. The setup they suggest prior to entering a corner applies to the Spyder.

    DO NOT RIDE THE BRAKE, or touch the brake when riding or cornering:
    Pay attention to whether you are doing this and stop-it! Far too many people seem to have this bad-habit, and the Spyder’s Nanny doesn't like it.
    The Nanny-system will begin to give you trouble eventually. So blame yourself if you ride your brake and have problems!

    Apply brake when starting the engine:
    Too many new riders are finding themselves stranded with a Spyder that won't start; until they finally put their foot on the brake and find their Spyder starts right up.
    An SE5 Spyder requires pressure on the brake to start it unless you are in neutral.
    o Many make sure it is in neutral before shutting the motor down. You don't have to do that. The SE5 Spyder will go into neutral automatically when started while applying the brake.

    Cruise Control Hint:
    When disengaging the cruise control (i.e., by tapping the brakes slightly) the Spyder makes an abrupt slow down.
    To eliminate this, slightly "roll-on" the throttle (as if slightly accelerating) before tapping the brakes. When doing so, the cruise control will disengage smoothly without any jerking motion of a slow down.
    Practice this a couple times until you see how easy it is to solve this problem.

    Do not ride on gravel roads:
    Despite the fact you are on three-wheels -- you are also "belt-driven". Rocks and belts don't mix. Try to avoid riding on gravel whenever possible, and check your belt right after doing so if you have to ride on gravel.

    Stop Light Activation:
    Spyders sometimes cannot activate stoplights controlled by sensors implanted in the road at the stop; or that have infrared sensors.
    When pulling up to a stoplight, look to see if there is a square or rectangle tar-shape on the road. If there is, pull the center of your Spyder over the top of one of the tar-strips -- preferably at the corner of the square or rectangle. This will expose as much metal of your Spyder as possible to help set-off the sensors.
    If you do not see sensor markings, look for an infrared sensor up near the lights. Typically, they are aluminum-color and look a bit like a camera pointed at the stopping location. If present, position your Spyder dead center of where it is pointing to help set it off.
    Be sure you are not too far back or forward of the area you need to be for either of these sensors -- otherwise you will not set them off.
    Where sensors do not work well, pull forward safely enough to let the vehicle behind set-off the sensors.
    Many states have laws allowing you to move through an intersection after waiting for a specific time. My state (Illinois) has such a law, and I use it any time the lights do not work. Check the laws of the states you are traveling through.

    Pay attention to how your Spyder is running:
    If your Spyder is showing even the slightest sign of not running or operating right; check to be sure you are not guilty of doing, or are not doing any of the items listed here.
    If not, then get your Spyder checked-out soon as possible or risk having problems later -- possibly while on a trip.
    Sometimes a subtle difference is an early sign of something going wrong or out of adjustment. Spyders can be sensitive machines.

    SHIFTING SUGGESTIONS:
    (The shifting-point suggestions for the 1330 and 900 series engines are explained separately.)

    Shifting the 1330 models:

    The “ECO” mode shift coach suggests shifting at the following rpm’s:
    1st to 2nd: 1,800 rpm’s
    2nd to 3rd: 1,950 rpm’s
    3rd and up: 2,200 rpm’s

    Most owners, and my personal experience, indicate shifting at or near 2500 rpm’s seems to be the preferred shift point; and it also happens to fall right at the beginning of the first-level power band. (Funny how that seems to work! See below.)

    1330 Engine Power Band (Dyno-Chart Data):

    1st level power band begins at approximately 2,500 — 2,700 rpm’s and remains flat until 4,000 rpm’s.
    2nd level power band begins at approximately 4,500 — 4,700 rpm’s and peaks at 5,000 rpm’s.
    After 5,000 rpm’s the power declines slightly until reaching 6,000 rpm’s; where the power rapidly declines; thus proving any increase in rpm’s above 6,000 rpm’s on the 1300 is inefficient and fruitless with regard to obtaining additional power and torque.

    What does this mean?
    It means shifting below 2,500 rpm’s can put an extra load on the machine when accelerating above a relaxed pace. While it may appear the engine has plenty of power below 2,500, it, in fact, is not producing peak performance power at that point, thus, shifting below the power band makes the engine work a bit harder. While the manual suggests shifting below 2,500 rpm’s, it is doing so with the thought the operator is accelerating at a very relaxed pace.
    Some have a misperception with regard to shifting a machine within its peak power band. It is often perceived to require harder/faster acceleration; when, in fact, that is not the case.
    It simply means you hold the machine in a gear longer before shifting. One does not have to takeoff from a dead stop like a drag racer to shift within a vehicle’s power band. Again, you simply hold it in each gear for a bit longer until the rpm’s reach the power band.
    American’s have long been known to have a preference to low-torque machines. With that often comes the tendency to want to shift to a vehicle’s highest gear as soon as possible, and leave it there… at least until the engine begins to shake and shudder. Not a good idea with any vehicle.

    Why is this important?
    Over a short period of time and mileage, there would probably be little noticeable affect or damage to a machine operated below its power band under normal, relaxed conditions; however, over a longer-term, there certainly can be a excessive wear along the machine’s drivetrain.
    In addition to seeking peak vehicle performance, expert/professional drivers & riders always operate their machines within its power band at all times for added control and handling. Consider it a safety precaution.
    Any vehicle operated outside of its peak performance band is operated with some loss of control and efficiency — varying, of course, to the degree it is operated out of its power band.
    For most owners of the 1330 engine, its lower torque seems to satisfy the inherent American “need” for an engine operating at a lower rpm.
    NOTE: There is not a “Trailer Mode” for the 1300 model.

    1330 "ECO" Shifting:(Check your manual) (Provided by PMK)
    The ECO (fuel economy mode) setting reduces fuel consumption by limiting throttle response and maximum throttle opening to maintain an optimal cruising setting.
    Activating the ECO Mode:
    Press the "MODE" button for 2-seconds while in the Main Screen.
    When activated, a green arrow will alternate with the gearbox position indicator to indicate the optimal timing to up-shift the transmission.
    NOTE: The Gearbox indicator will return when the transmission is shifted.
    De-Activating the ECO Mode:
    Press the "MODE" button for 2-seconds while in the Main Screen.
    ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: (provided by Lamonster) The throttle map changes to a more progressive acceleration; rather than a linear one. During hard acceleration there will not be an indication to shift -- the ECM understands you are accelerating and will not recommend a shift at this time. Only when the vehicle speed and acceleration have stabilized for a certain time and the ECM judges there is enough engine torque available in the next gear to keep the same speed and acceleration will an upshift indication be displayed.

    Shifting the 900 series models:


    900 Series Engine Power Band (Dyno Chart Data):
    The 900 series engine’s power band begins at approximately 4500 rpm’s (much higher than the 1330 engine). However, there is a substantial increase in the power efficiency of the engine beginning at around 5000 – 5500 rpm’s.
    There is an additional increase in the power band at around 6000 rpm’s; where it continues to climb until around 7800 rpm’s, after which the power remains flat before reducing after 8000 rpm’s.

    What does this mean and why is this important?
    It simply means the same as mentioned above regarding the 1300 engine’s power band.
    Shifting or operating a vehicle outside or below the power band provides less than stellar performance, less control, and potential wear and damage in extreme or prolonged operation.
    Please read the explanation under the 1330 engine operation.

    Cruise at higher RPM's with the 900 series engine:
    This seems to be a big hurdle for too many owners of the 900 series engine models. Europeans understand high-rev motors – Americans, not so much.
    Get over your fear of running the Spyder's Rotax engine at high rpm's. A properly maintained Rotax engine is designed to run at high rpm’s. Do not listen to anyone telling you otherwise. Far too many reliable experts are on the side of this advice.
    For proof: The RTS SE5's "Trailer Mode" (with fully loaded trailer) won't let you shift out of first-gear until you hit almost 28 MPH! BRP’s own design engineers let you know the machine can run at higher rpm’s; and force it to do so in “Trailer Mode”. Check this link also, where the owner's Spyder suffered problems by running at low rpm's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...ifting-results

    SE5 RTS 900 Series Clutch Engagement and Performance (Does not apply to the 1330 models.):
    The Spyder's SE5 clutch is considered fully engaged (stalled) when the rpm's are at 3200 (+/- 200). See the manual. Running at rpm's at or lower than this range for extended periods allows slippage of the clutch, resulting in premature wear on the clutch. (They are expensive to replace.)
    It is universal in opinion from experienced riders, the best performance is realized when keeping your Spyder's RPM's at 4300 or above no matter the gear you are in at any time (First-gear being the exception, of course). This does NOT mean to shift at 4300 rpm’s; but rather to shift at higher rpm’s so that the rpm’s drop no lower than 4300 when engaged in the next, higher gear. Shifting at 4300 rpm’s will drop the rpm’s close to the “clutch-locked” rpm of around 3500 and is far below the power-band of the engine. Not recommended.

    Engine Lugging:

    Do NOT lug your Rotax engine! Shifting at too low of rpm can easily cause lugging, and the damage related to it. Example: When accelerating quickly, or climbing a steep hill, you can cause the Spyder to “lug” unless you downshift first. Lugging is evident when you hear or feel knocking and vibrations beyond the norm, as well as having a lack of power. Lugging can be done easily in any gear between second to fifth. Downshift to avoid lugging. NOTE: The RTS-SE5's manual may confuse some on pages 71 and 76 (2011 manual) where it mentions 3,000 rpm's as the "magic-number" to shift, and not to exceed 4,000 rpm's. This references someone learning to ride the Spyder for the first time -- not necessarily the normal operating range. 3,000 rpm’s is below the clutch’s locked position; thus causing slippage (wear).

    DO NOT USE ALL THE GEARS ALL THE TIME: (All models.)
    Just because the Spyder has 5 or 6 gears does NOT mean you have to always use all of them all the time! Apparently there are far too many who assume they have to shift their Spyder up to fifth or sixth gear no matter what their speed is, and this could be a problem. Get over what ever is making you think you need to use all the gears all the time.

    For the 900 series:
    Keep the rpm’s at 4300 or higher no matter what gear you are in. If you drop below that, then downshift and remain in that gear. You do not have to use all the gears every single time you ride.
    Example: When cruising with a 5-speed 900 series around town at 39 to 49 MPH you should stay in 3rd-gear. You can cruise between 39 - 49 MPH all day in 3rd-gear. It is okay to do so. Shifting to 4th-gear in that scenario will drop the RPM's below the 4300 range; which strains the Spyder's ability to perform at its best power-range and diminishes the performance and enjoyment of your machine. If your Spyder feels “mushy” at the throttle, then downshift – and below 4300 rpm’s it will feel mushy.

    SHIFTING-POINT SUGGESTIONS for an RTS-SE5:
    1st to 2nd gear: Shift between 22 MPH and 29+ MPH - no sooner!
    2nd to 3rd gear: Shift at 5100+ rpm's (39 MPH) Up-shifting to 3rd gear drops the rpm’s to 4,300 -- exactly the rpm's you want to stay above.
    3rd to 4th gear: Shift again at 5100+ rpm's (49 MPH)
    4th to 5th gear: Shift to 5th only when you reach 65 MPH on level terrain. Upshift and downshifting in 5th is expected on hilly terrain to keep the rpm’s up.

    You can ride ALL-DAY in 4th-gear between 49 MPH up to and including 65 MPH without ever using 5th gear. On some rides you may never use 5th gear -- period. (Some run at much higher rpm's than that.) NOTE: Cruising in 4th gear between 63-65 MPH will have the rpm's in the mid 5,000 rpm range -- which begins to put the engine in its better performance-range (more power) which is what you want for power and control. NOTE: You will find your Spyder will run quieter, smoother and still have power at the throttle in that rpm range, and the dreaded "belt-vibration" might not be a problem when you finally get used to the above suggestions.

    DO NOT ROLL-OFF THE THROTTLE when shifting an SE5 and SE6:
    The manual states you do not have to roll-off the throttle when shifting with the SE5/SE6 system, and it is suggested you do not.
    Hold the throttle steady (do not accelerate or decelerate) when hitting the paddle-shifter at the above recommended shift-points, and you will find your Spyder SE5/SE6 shifts very smoothly when doing so. Try it... eventually, you'll become very good at shifting.

    DO NOT hold the SE5 and SE6 shift-paddle too long:
    A few have had problems when resting their fingers “heavy” on the paddle-shifter; which apparently can confuse the Spyder's Nanny regarding what your intentions are. Hold the paddle-shifter only long enough to shift gears.

    Downshifting with the SE5 and SE6:
    There is a lot conversation about this subject. The SE5 will automatically downshift for you, so you are not required to downshift if you do not want to. However, advanced & professional riders recommend getting in the habit of manually downshifting at all times to help maintain full rider-control of their machine at any moment (by maintaining power and torque-control at an optimal configuration).
    In rare occurrences after a fast/sudden full stop, some found their Spyder may not downshift into first-gear if they did not manually downshift. There is no quick resolution... you just have to repeatedly try to get into first again. Rev the engine, try reverse, try anything... eventually it should shift, while drivers honk at you for not moving!

    Big V-Twin Riders and the 900 Series Rotax Engine:
    Big V-twin riders are often too accustomed to their engine lugging along at 2,100 to 3,500 RPM's, and expect a 900 series Spyder to do the same. Doing so is a killer for the 900 series Spyder engine.

    Gas Mileage at Higher RPM's:
    Any engine’s "power to fuel-efficiency" will be found within its power band. This principle holds true for all engines within their power band.
    The 900 series engines are not champions of fuel mileage; so expect to stop more often for fuel. Start looking at around 120 miles.
    Fuel mileage is considerably better on the 1330 models. Many are seeing nearly 35-40 mpg, depending on the conditions and load.

    IN CONCLUSION OF SHIFTING SUGGESTIONS:
    Simply believe what you just read above about shifting and engine performance for the model you own and do it. You will discover an entirely different, more enjoyable experience when you finally do so.

    MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS TO CHECK OR DO:

    Tire Pressure and Shock-Setting:
    Both make a big difference in how the Spyder handles. Tire pressure and shock setting depends on your load-weight, and type of riding. Check these settings often -- and remember no vehicle operates at its best when over-weighted! Sorry... but that is just how it is.
    Tire pressure suggestions: Pre-2013 RTS: 18 pounds in the front tires and 28 pounds in the back tire. (The RT-S SE5 2011 manual recommends 15-17 pounds for the front tire; and 28-30 for the rear tire.)
    2013 models: 15-16 psi in the front-tire (as per NancysToys).
    1330 suggestions: (Updates to come.)
    Front shock settings (for adjustable shocks): For the front (manually adjusted) shock, use 4 or 5.
    Seems the stiffer the better for most, especially if you are “loading” the Spyder (check the manual for load limits).
    Don't forget the RTS has a rear air-shock that can also be adjusted to your liking. (READ THE MANUAL)

    Check your battery cables, fuses, and such often:
    Anytime these get loose from vibration the Spyder's Nanny will "speak to you". These, seemingly "small", issues are often found to be the root of many owners' problem-posts. Do let yourself be a victim of forgetting these simple inspection points.

    Check your windshield brackets often:
    They have been known to fail occasionally. The consensus is if you run with your shield "full-down" most of the time, it will cause undue stress on the middle bracket, which raises and lowers the shield. Move the shield up slightly off the metal-stop to avoid the potential damage. Keep in mind you cannot replace just the bracket. The entire lift-mechanism has to be replaced to the tune of around $600.

    Battery Tenders:
    "Tenders" help prolong a battery's life by “conditioning” it, while keeping it charged. (Short-rides may not always sufficiently charge your battery.)
    Make sure you get a battery-tender -- NOT a regular charger for this purpose. There is a difference!
    Tenders are particularly valuable if you store your Spyder for longer periods of time (typically more than a few weeks without riding); or if your battery is older.
    IMPORTANT NOTE (Pre-2013's): When permanently attaching the pigtail cables for your tender; NEVER loosen the negative jumper terminal connection (found under the seat when you open it); or use it to ground any accessory! You need to connect the battery-tender pigtails to the actual battery terminal posts found only by removing some of the panels. This issue has been well publicized on spyderlovers.com. The following thread is one you can start with regarding this: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-FRIGGIN-IDIOT It is troublesome to remove the Tupperware to get to the actual battery terminals or other ground connections, but it is essential on the Spyder to do so.
    Starting with the 2013's, the battery is now accessible through the front trunk (“frunk”), which makes it a lot easier for get to it.

    Fluid levels (brake, oil, coolant) have to be correct (All models):
    Check the fluids as you add miles and top-them-off; otherwise risk having problems with your Spyder (sometimes fairly major).
    Low brake fluid: Can cause your Spyder to throw a code; thus stopping your trip while you scratch your head wondering why. Brake fluid level can go down as your brake pads wear over time.
    Low Oil can cause SE5/SE6 Shifting Problems: A low oil reading; at or below the ADD mark, on the dipstick has been known to cause shifting problems. Failure to maintain a proper oil level might not only cause shifting problems, but possibly premature clutch failure. Keep your oil properly filled, as per your manual. BRP suggests checking the oil-level every 300-miles.
    Coolant levels: Check this occasionally. Leaks have been known to occur occasionally in the system. A technician, at the first opportunity, should look at any low-level indication for possible leaks.
    RTS 1330 2014 Oil Change: Here is a link to a great tutorial on an oil-change for the 2014 RTS 1330. It notes a few errors in the manual: (Provided by Texas) http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-RT-Oil-Change

    SE5/SE6 shifting problems / Cracked Vacuum Hoses:
    Cracked (dry-rotted) vacuum hoses are related to shifting problems on the SE5's. Heat seems to be the culprit.
    Have these checked regularly as part of your maintenance program and replace them if needed.
    No reports on the 2014 1330's yet; but this may remain an issue despite the improved cooling system.

    SE5/SE6 Shifting Sensor:
    The "shifting-sensor" on a few SE5's has failed causing the machine not to shift, or to shift inconsistently. There is no advance resolution for this problem. It is simply suggested you pay attention to your machine's shifting, and have it checked occasionally when at the dealer. (Again, this may also be a maintenance point for the 1330’s.)

    Unlocking a Stuck Frunk (Front trunk): (Provided by Finless)
    This is a link to a thread on Spyderlovers.com providing a video of how to get your "frunk" unstuck; as well as cautionary words about keeping it from getting stuck. Several of the posts within the thread discuss the various differences between models and model-years; however it appears this valuable piece of information would work for most. http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...runk-lid-video

    DO NOT Overfill the Gas Tank (Does not apply to 1330 models):
    This causes a few problems. When you get an inch or more below the top of the tank, stop filling it – period!
    Overfilling causes fuel to flow-over into the evap-canister or when the fuel gets hot and expands.
    This can lead to problems with gas-fumes (smell), and a potential fire hazard.
    In late 2012, early 2013, BRP sent owners of all models new gas-caps to seal better and help with the gas fume problem. However, the gas-fume smell can be persistent in some cases. See your dealer if you experience an excessive smell of fuel when riding or after. There are a few threads on the subject that you can thumb-through and share with your mechanic. http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Fix-Gas-SMell

    Security Screws on the Body Panel: DO NOT REMOVE THEM! (Provided by NancysToys)
    Any security screws on a Spyder are there for a reason...they are not to be removed.
    On an RT they hold the posts that slip into the rubber grommets that hold the body panel in place. These are angled, and indexed to hold them in the correct position.
    Remove the standard Torx screws then pull the panel out of the grommets. Be careful putting the panel back on...the grommets can be pushed through pretty easily. Wetting the grommets and post first helps.
    Do not lubricate the grommets unless you want to lose a panel...especially the oil check panel and its twin sister.

    Radio Pre-sets: (Provided by Badazzspydee)

    Apparently some manuals have not provided complete instructions on setting presets for radio stations. Here are the instructions to do so.
    1. Press “Mode” button until the “Audio icon” appears.
    2. Use the “right or left command buttons” to find the radio station you want.
    3. A long press will start the seek feature to the next available station. Continue doing performing a seek until the station you want appears.
    4. Here is the missing step. Press the “Set” button longer than one-second to enter the Tune or Setup screen. The word “Record” should appear under the numbers of the current radio station. The shop manual states that you can tune the station in increments of .2 by short pressing the left or right command buttons now.
    5. Short press the “Up” button until the “Preset number” you want appears in the box to the left side of the screen. I noticed this step is touchy when trying to get the number to stay in the box!
    6. Immediately press and hold the “down button”.
    7. Once the preset takes, the screen will exit the Tune or Setup screen and returns to the initial Audio screen.
    8. Repeat steps 2 through 5 for the next preset. Note that doing a short press of the left or right command buttons will cycle through the already set presets. A long press will start the seek feature.

    Listen to the radio without having the key turned-on or engine running: (Provided by szohar)
    Immediately press and hold the MODE button for a few seconds after turning the engine off. The radio will start-up. To turn if off, just turn the Hazard Warning lights on and then off. (Provided by billybovine)

    Fuel Octane:

    This subject is not up for a long debate on this thread. Fuel octane (and what it means) is second only to discussions on oil; and there are as many opinions and misperceptions as there are people giving them -- so if you have an opinion on fuel octane -- put it on another thread PLEASE!
    Fuel octane rating does NOT indicate whether one is superior to another, as many believe. In other words, 93-octane fuel is not a superior fuel to a lower octane fuel. It is simply different and designed for a specific engine use.
    What you should know though, is manufacturers do not just “make-up” an octane recommendation out of thin air for their engines. Using a fuel of an octane rating out of the recommended range can cause: Poor performance, possibly higher fuel consumption, and engine-knocking (damage to the engine); just to name a few issues.
    Your Spyder is an expensive vehicle, so make your own decision.
    Read your owner's manual for the recommended octane-rating for your model and location (U.S. / Non-U.S.)

    Customizing your Spyder for performance, fitment, and looks:
    Too often we read where someone buys a product only to find it does not work well, is not compatible with a Spyder, and/or the customer service from the provider is not good. Custom, after-market, equipment covering just about everything imaginable for a Spyder is readily available for most model types and years from the many sponsors of Spyderlovers.com
    Do yourself a favor and avoid problems by asking other members what they use and their experience with it. It could save you a lot of grief and expense.

    Lastly… Be sure to have fun and ride often... Which probably is the #1 "MUST DO".



    Disclaimer: The "Do's & Do Not's" is provided solely for informational purposes, and from sources thought to be reliable; however no guarantee is provided or to be implied by the information provided. The information may be updated, corrected, or deleted without notice to the potential end-user at any time. The end-user of any or all of this information remains wholly liable for their actions or inactions relating to the use of this information. The information is not intended to be a complete guide to the operation of the vehicle of reference; thus the end-user must always refer to their user's manual or qualified dealer as the final authorized source. Spyderlovers.com, its founder, officers, members, affiliates, and sponsors are not liable for one's use, or lack of use, of any or all information. Any end-user application of, or reference to, this information hereby confirms the end-user's complete knowledge, understanding, and acceptance of their sole and complete liability relating to the use of the information provided.

  13. #263
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    Default Thanks so much!!!!

    Just purchased a 2010 RTS-SM5. Reading through this thread is wonderful! My first priority is a new battery - the scoot wouldn't start without an overnight recharge. Next will be a belt-guard.
    My previous scoot was a 750 cc Honda Shadow. Rode it from Michigan to Maine, Key West, Wyoming..... and ()work. The closest I came to falling off the bike was when I tripped over my camera bag right after getting off the bike. Since I was still in my helmet, no injuries. BUT - I am a photographer, and the complicated procedure of unlocking the camera from the converted toolbox on back (3 latches), then getting the tripod pieces out of the side-bag and re-assembling it caused me to forget what I wanted to shoot.

    Once again, thanks for all the great info!
    ~Sandee~

  14. #264
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandeejs View Post
    Just purchased a 2010 RTS-SM5. Reading through this thread is wonderful! My first priority is a new battery - the scoot wouldn't start without an overnight recharge. Next will be a belt-guard.
    My previous scoot was a 750 cc Honda Shadow. Rode it from Michigan to Maine, Key West, Wyoming..... and ()work. The closest I came to falling off the bike was when I tripped over my camera bag right after getting off the bike. Since I was still in my helmet, no injuries. BUT - I am a photographer, and the complicated procedure of unlocking the camera from the converted toolbox on back (3 latches), then getting the tripod pieces out of the side-bag and re-assembling it caused me to forget what I wanted to shoot.

    Once again, thanks for all the great info!
    ~Sandee~

    I've had that problem when shooting pics, too. Now I enjoy my ryde, and get lots of images on neurochrome!!
    PrairieSpyder (Patti)

  15. #265
    Active Member cyclekid58's Avatar
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    Cool Gravel

    Quote Originally Posted by ARCTIC View Post
    Here's one that I didn't know as I had never been around motorcycles or spyders:

    DO NOT RIDE IT DOWN GRAVEL ROADS

    I took it to the gravel road 1st day I owned it. Thought it'd be a good place to ride it and get used to the handling without traffic. 3 wheels on the ground would make you think it's perfect for gravel cruising. I pushed a rock into my belt. Since then, I've added the spyderpops guard
    The 2014 seems to have a full belt guard that previous models didn't, on this model is the spyderpops guard that much better?
    Greetings from Idaho

    2014 RT-S,
    Barjaron swaybar, chome luggage rack, Ram Mount GPS, 12 volt dash outlet, spyderflap mudflap, Rivco flag mounts, drink2go and custom handlebar drink holders,Driver Backrest,Tri-Axis Handlebars, ******* turn signal lights. Custon Dynamic Magic Strobe Brake Modulator, Triple Dash Pouches, "Squared Away" Laser Alignment, Spyderpops Bumpskid, ******* "Knightrider" LED






  16. #266
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    Quote Originally Posted by PrairieSpyder View Post
    Now I enjoy my ryde, and get lots of images on neurochrome!!
    Neurochrome? That is funny! Thanks!

    ~Sandee~

  17. #267
    Very Active Member Deer Slayer's Avatar
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    Default Goog true poop!

    I read this thread and applied the info to my 13 RS-S. FIRST fuel check just over 40 mpg and it was at 154 total miles. Now I know I lost man points but I will take the 40 mpg and it is not broken yet! Thanks for the information ya'll.
    If I can't fix it, I will fix it so no one can fix it. Sypder Loco!

  18. #268
    Very Active Member Lew L's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Good info on this thread

    Recent purchase of a '14 RT-S in bright YELLOW. Can't emphasize enough that the correct tire pressure is really important!! My Spyder was delivered from the dealer with 12 psi in the fronts and 23 in the back tire. Can you say wonky handeling?? I put on the heavier anti-sway bar ( which helped) but a big difference came with the correct tire pressure. MUCH BETTER HANDELING. So as the manual and this thread say----check the tire pressure!!

    Kaos

  19. #269
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    Default Lots of new stuff....my head hurts!

    I'm so new that I don't even have my Spyder yet. Bought it used, 2013 RT-S w/less than 800 miles, from a dealer in another state and he's going to deliver it after servicing.

    Thanks for all the great free advice, especially this post. Downloaded the owner's manual from the BRP website and going through it now.

    But, at least I'll have some knowledge for how to do things right when it does arrive.

  20. #270
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    Quote Originally Posted by tmlackey View Post
    I'm so new that I don't even have my Spyder yet. Bought it used, 2013 RT-S w/less than 800 miles, from a dealer in another state and he's going to deliver it after servicing.

    Thanks for all the great free advice, especially this post. Downloaded the owner's manual from the BRP website and going through it now.

    But, at least I'll have some knowledge for how to do things right when it does arrive.
    and on joining the Spyderverse!
    PrairieSpyder (Patti)

  21. #271
    Very Active Member OJ UK's Avatar
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    Cool

    If you're used to riding motorcycles it'll take you a few trips to adjust but
    the penny will drop! Have fun!
    Attached Images Attached Images
    The archetypal English gentleman.......mostly!

  22. #272
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    Quote Originally Posted by RTwing View Post
    This would be a deal killer for me as I love riding the back roads. I think the biggest issue here is the over tightening of the drive belt. These grimler belts are like the standard chains, one would never tighten a chain but rather leave some good slack. The belts can have several inches of slack and still never climb or slip same as a chain. In fact the proper description is chain/belt. Also over-tightening can cause wheel hub issues and buzzing due to wind induced harmonics.
    I have several belt drive RT's now and keep the belts slightly loose on all of them and yes gravel is part of the deal without a problem.

    I also realize most people don't wish to ride where dust is present and are concerned with the machine looking nice and clean. I guess I am not most people and also own a pressure washer.
    Clearly riding on gravel is an issue with any vehicle having part of its drive-train exposed to intrusion by any debris; however if you wanted to ride yours on gravel you could come-up with some sort of guard to prevent intrusion; at least for most of the time.

    There are a few who were on this site several years ago who road only off-road. They modified their Spyder for it and we never heard complaints from them. Not sure some would do the mods they did, but it worked for them and that is all that counts.

    It sounds like you know what you are doing and have the ability to remedy the problem if needed. I am like you in that I prefer a machine to be ridden rather than "decorated".

    Also, as mentioned, the '14's have a better guard than previous years. Good luck to you!

    Ride often, safe, and aware!

    Illinois Boy

    PS: This thread is just about to get a complete overhaul to include more about the F-3; as well as to make the information more concise. I should have taken the slow winter to have done this, but somehow was kept too busy.

    SL #7026
    VBA #652
    HOG #3935417
    2011 Viper-Red Spyder RT SE5 & Trailer
    2017 HD Ultra Limited
    Former Rides: 2014 HD Ultra Limited; '04 Kawa Nomad; '09 HD Ultra-Classic; and many Hondas through the years.
    Spyder Newbies Do's & Do Not's: http://www.spyderlovers.com/forums/s...-Spyder-owners

  23. #273
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    Quote Originally Posted by ttc View Post
    Great post


    I am guilty of changing gears too early, now I know what I should be doing, I will


    FYI - The opinion on RPM is just that. When taking it easy, or around town, I keep it under 4K rpm, usually cruising around 3500rpm. I have no idea why folks recommend more, (mileage is not a valid reason) unless the discussion relates to SE models and preserving the clutch. I also observed that the 2009 SE5 I drove was a vibration machine where as my 2011 SM is SMOOTH. There is ample power available from 3000rpm's and up for around town. For freeway / highway, or higher speed riding, more RPM's are useful, but definitely not NECESASARY. And revving the engine higher, is certain to use more fuel, not less.

    Just my opinion, but I personally believe the RPM recommendation (to stay over 5K rpm) is misguided, and wrong. Perhaps there was some change made after 2008, that made it smoother, but either way, I don't run my vehicles anywhere near their torque peak at steady speeds, unless max towing, into the wind. The lowest rpm that provides sufficient power, that the engine rus smoothly at, is the correct rpm.

    Lovin the new Spyder, 400+ miles in the first 5 days of ownership!
    Last edited by isthatahemi; 04-21-2015 at 07:17 PM.

  24. #274
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    Quote Originally Posted by isthatahemi View Post
    FYI - The opinion on RPM is just that. When taking it easy, or around town, I keep it under 4K rpm, usually cruising around 3500rpm. I have no idea why folks recommend more, (mileage is not a valid reason) unless the discussion relates to SE models and preserving the clutch. I also observed that the 2009 SE5 I drove was a vibration machine where as my 2011 SM is SMOOTH. There is ample power available from 3000rpm's and up for around town. For freeway / highway, or higher speed riding, more RPM's are useful, but definitely not NECESASARY. And revving the engine higher, is certain to use more fuel, not less.

    Just my opinion, but I personally believe the RPM recommendation (to stay over 5K rpm) is misguided, and wrong. Perhaps there was some change made after 2008, that made it smoother, but either way, I don't run my vehicles anywhere near their torque peak at steady speeds, unless max towing, into the wind. The lowest rpm that provides sufficient power, that the engine rus smoothly at, is the correct rpm.
    Lovin the new Spyder, 400+ miles in the first 5 days of ownership!
    Wondered about the high RPM ranges myself. I've had my 2011 RS-S, SM5 for a month now and noticed high RPMs lower gas mileage. Lower RPMs 4000 and under (around town) better gas mileage.
    Currently Own: 2011 RS-S SM5 - BRP Comfort Seat, Juice Box Pro, Two Brothers Exhaust

    Previously Owned: 1991 GS500E

  25. #275
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    Personally, I don't care for the noise of an engine spinning 2K higher than necessary. Burning fuel, generating heat, and generally making a racket. Just me though!
    Those who can't, criticize those who do.

    2011 Spyder RSS SM5 - Bought new Apr 2015

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