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  1. #26
    Very Active Member IdahoMtnSpyder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gwolf View Post
    I could be wrong, but I was under the impression the nanny used G forces to sense when the cornering speed was too high. In the case of G-forces, the sensor would not be affected by the tires at all........ only G-force of the turn.
    Correct! 2nd image is enlarged portion of first image.

    Yaw Rate Sensor 1.jpg Yaw Rate Sensor 1a.jpg Yaw Rate Sensor 2.JPG

    2014 Copper RTS

    Tri-Axis bars, CB, BajaRon sway bar & shock adjusters, SpyderPop's Bumpskid, NBV peg brackets, LED headlights and modulator, Wolo trumpet air horns, trailer hitch, custom trailer harness, high mount turn signals, Custom Dynamics brake light, LED turn signal lights on mirrors, LED strip light for a dash light, garage door opener, LED lights in frunk, trunk, and saddlebags, RAM mounts and cradles for tablet (for GPS) and phone (for music), and Smooth Spyder belt tensioner.

  2. #27
    Very Active Member Gwolf's Avatar
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    Yeah, I just dug into the tech stuff. The yaw rate sensor is located up on the front end under the instrument panel. It could not possibly know what the tires were doing. It is only concerned with the G-forces being applied by the turns. It measures and compensates by G-forces.

  3. #28
    Very Active Member h0gr1der's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gwolf View Post
    I could be wrong, but I was under the impression the nanny used G forces to sense when the cornering speed was too high. In the case of G-forces, the sensor would not be affected by the tires at all........ only G-force of the turn.
    I found out that regardless of G forces, if you lift a wheel the Nanny takes action! In my case on the 2018 RTL it just chopped the throttle for a brief second, then went right back to WOT when the wheel started spinning again. Wheel speed sensors play into the equation.
    h0gr1der
    2018 RT Limited Blue/Chrome SE6 *Tri-Axis Bars*Adjustable Driver Backrest*175/55R15 Vredestein Front, 205/60R15 Vredestein Rear Tires*Baja Ron Front Spring Pre-Load Adjusters*Misty Mountain Sheepskin seat cover*Centramatic balancers *Garmin Zumo 595LM GPS*KOTT Grills*BajaRon swaybar*SpyderPops Alignment*Missing Belt guard*Magnetic Mirrors*Custom Rear Adjustable Shock
    States Visited on Less than 4 wheels.

  4. #29
    Very Active Member Gwolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by h0gr1der View Post
    I found out that regardless of G forces, if you lift a wheel the Nanny takes action! In my case on the 2018 RTL it just chopped the throttle for a brief second, then went right back to WOT when the wheel started spinning again. Wheel speed sensors play into the equation.

    Yeah, it is all tied together. The yaw sensor, front and rear wheel speed sensors, steering angle sensor, pillion rider switch, brake fluid level sensors, it all works together to determine when the nanny takes some action and what action it takes.

    Even if the nanny is being activated by the tire lifting, there is also lateral G-forces working to lift the tire. Tires don't normally lift going in a straight line. The steering angle sensor is feeding the handlebar position into the computer also, which would be telling the computer if the wheel lifted due to a straight line jump or due to lateral forces in the turn.

  5. #30
    Active Member Fat Baxter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gwolf View Post
    Yeah, it is all tied together. The yaw sensor, front and rear wheel speed sensors, steering angle sensor, pillion rider switch, brake fluid level sensors, it all works together to determine when the nanny takes some action and what action it takes.

    Even if the nanny is being activated by the tire lifting, there is also lateral G-forces working to lift the tire. Tires don't normally lift going in a straight line. The steering angle sensor is feeding the handlebar position into the computer also, which would be telling the computer if the wheel lifted due to a straight line jump or due to lateral forces in the turn.
    This is a good time to ask something I've wondered about: has anyone ever flipped a Spyder in a hard turn? I know you can take a turn too wide, and wind up going into the weeds. But if you've got your steering dialed in correctly, and you hold it while at speed, can you flip a Spyder? Or will the nanny save you very time?
    Why, yes, I have a yellow Spyder. Why do you ask?

  6. #31
    Very Active Member IdahoMtnSpyder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fat Baxter View Post
    This is a good time to ask something I've wondered about: has anyone ever flipped a Spyder in a hard turn? I know you can take a turn too wide, and wind up going into the weeds. But if you've got your steering dialed in correctly, and you hold it while at speed, can you flip a Spyder? Or will the nanny save you very time?
    AFAIR, there has been no mention of anyone flipping a Spyder by turning too sharp, other than one guy who flipped his boss's Spyder by turning too sharp while going too fast in reverse! One guy flipped his when a car forced him into the median divider. And there a few that turned over in accidents. We should never say never, but it's pretty nigh impossible to flip a Spyder by turning too sharp. One thing Nanny is good at is being quick and decisive. She'll throttle back and hit the brakes as soon as she senses the forces necessary to flip over. That is, on a flat road. If you're going on a sidehill then it's a different game. A quick turn toward uphill just may cause one to flip since the force it takes to turn over will be less than on the flat.

    2014 Copper RTS

    Tri-Axis bars, CB, BajaRon sway bar & shock adjusters, SpyderPop's Bumpskid, NBV peg brackets, LED headlights and modulator, Wolo trumpet air horns, trailer hitch, custom trailer harness, high mount turn signals, Custom Dynamics brake light, LED turn signal lights on mirrors, LED strip light for a dash light, garage door opener, LED lights in frunk, trunk, and saddlebags, RAM mounts and cradles for tablet (for GPS) and phone (for music), and Smooth Spyder belt tensioner.

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