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    Active Member IdleUp's Avatar
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    Default Can Am Ryker 900 Hard Factís - Mike Mas




    Can Am Ryker 900 Hard Fact’s - Mike Mas

    Hello Spyder & Ryker Users - This review on the Can Am - Ryker is my personal findings compiled from riding Spyder’s since 2007, research of the Ryker, and my findings after riding a few Ryker’s for evaluation. The focus of this review is not to discourage anyone from buying a Ryker, or to find fault with the machine, but to help new and future owners better understand the Ryker’s shortcomings.

    Internet Reviews - The term; “If you seen one - you’ve seen them all” might best describe a fair portion of the reviews on line. Most of the guys who perform these manufacturer reviews, are like parrots, when each guy get’s Ryker loaner, they all follow scripted release notes from the manufacture. This means 90% of all reviews contain the same findings and dialog. Another problem is; 90% of the guys are 2 wheel riders, and never rode a forward trike before, so they don’t have a clue how to evaluate a Ryker. If there is a problem, it’s skimmed over to appear it was planned and for the betterment of the rider.

    Such an example is the deleted electro-mechanical steering system - Which interfaces with the VSS to control steerings torque at highway speeds. For cost reasons, BRP deleted this feature. Regardless, 90% of the reviewers chose the fake narrative the electric steering was deliberately left off since “It gives the rider has a better feel of the road”. This could not be further from the truth. Instead of providing better control, “mechanical only” steering makes the Ryker’s steering less safe, since its extremely over-sensitive at high speeds. It’s for this reason and other weak points of the Ryker, I decided to provide an independent review which is not influenced by any internet sites, magazines or manufacturers, to disclose apparent problems with the Ryker.

    Pulling The Trigger - After letting the “Ryker Dust”” settle for a few months and even after hearing some problems with the Ryker, I still decided to pull the trigger and add a 900 to my fleet to play with. After riding pretty much the same Spyder’s since 07, I was looking for some new bolts to turn. To be honest, I was not expecting much for 10 grand, I knew the Ryker would be a stripped down version of the Spyder. Regardless, I called my dealer and told them I would be down on a Monday.

    With “Cash in Hand” and a smile on my face - Linda and I jumped in our new Jeep Pickup and headed to Atlanta. As we arrived, they had both a Ryker 900, and a Rally parked side by side and ready to ride. As I exited the truck, and got my first “real glimpse” of the Ryker. Unlike the flashy “Strobing Light Videos” and cool images on the BRP site to make the Ryker look high-tech, instead the Ryker looked much stranger than I expected. As I walked up behind the machine, the Ryker reminded me more of a 3 wheeled wheelbarrow, with the rear tire and swing arm being the handle, and the Ryker’s blunt squared off nose, being the wheelbarrow body with two wheels.



    The Ryker is definitely not pretty, sleek or high tech looking - It appears as if BRP was pushing the design envelope to make it high tech looking, and something went horribly wrong. In a strange way, the Ryker’s weird design, also reminded me of my past Slingshot, where Polaris quit designing the bike from the drivers seat rearward, and the back end of the Slingshot ended up looking like a “living room couch” going down the road at 65 mph.

    After the some foundling and rubbing on the Ryker for 15-20 minutes - As I dropped the gate on my pick-up to grab my helmet, in the excitement, I realized I left my damn Go Pro home, so you’ll have to rely on my memory for this review.

    My First Ride - After a few minutes on the Ryker’s start sequence, I was finally ready to start my anticipated check ride. Fortunately, my dealer in North Georgia is located in a great area for bike riding. After a few blocks of obstructions, there’s some great twist & turn roads some 5 miles long, which eventually turn rural and straight, where I could wind the Ryker up to 60-80 mph.

    Gear Lash
    - Regretfully even before I got out of the parking lot, I discovered the Ryker has a drive train problem. As soon you put the bike in gear and the CVT engages, there is this horrendous noise. Not a thump like the Spyder, a mechanical metal clunk, where something is not fitted correctly. This same problem is also evident as you let off and quickly re-apply throttle. Perhaps its where the CVT clutch splines to the drive shaft? In any case, having this much free play or lash on a brand new bike, is not a good sign, since this will only worsen as it wears in.

    Suspension
    - As I exited the lot, I ended up on a rural road which was fairly smooth. At first, the Ryker felt a bit like like my older 07 Can Am Roadster, except it was defiantly louder. As soon as I began moving over 15-20 mph, the once hard steering, became easy to turn. As I went around a few moderate curves, the bike didn’t feel bad. As I followed some traffic ahead of me, I started to relax a bit and enjoy the ride. For a while, everything seemed fine for a $10k bike, however as the traffic lightened up, and I got up 35 mph, as I reached some open road and started going over some road patches, the 900’s Sachs coil over spring suspension, was struggling to isolate the road from the bike. Unlike a Spyder F3 where you watch the front tires react to the bumps, and little to none reaches the bike and bars, nearly all the road imperfections were immediately transmitted to the Ryker’s frame, handle bars and rider.

    Before I go Further - If you’re thinking the cure for this bad suspension is to get the Rally model with its KYB HPG shocks, think again, I found the Rally actually had a harsher and stiffer ride than the standard Ryker. The end result, there is virtually no improvement in ride between the two models. While the Rally offers some fancy wheels and a missing fender, they both exhibit the same handling qualities. Either on or off road, both models beat the rider up on rough surfaces.

    Keeping the tires on the Ground - In North Georgia, most all the roads at one time were slab concrete and paved over in asphalt, so as the slabs settle, the asphalt above it cracks, and it can make for a rough ride. As I reached some open road, at 40-45 mph, the steering suddenly became very light. Regardless, the Ryker still seemed to steer OK. As I drove another mile or so, the road surface changed for the worse, and every 10 feet or so, there was a slab-gap or imperfection on the road. As I went around a shallow turn, as the Ryker hit these bad spots at around 40, the front tires started dancing sideways a bit losing traction after each road gap on the curve.

    As I increased the speed to 55 - The Ryker’s steering reached a point of being over-sensitive, where even just a slight movement on the bar would cause the tires to over-bite. Even in moderate curves, if there was any road imperfection, it would immediately upset the bike’s track. As I continued on, I increased the speed to 60 mph. As I approached an another curve, this time I let off the throttle a bit, to move the Ryker’s weight forward to the front end. Regardless, the moment I hit the slab imperfections, both front tires immediately lost track and the front-end shifted horizontally. As I reached almost the end of the curve and added throttle, the back end of the Ryker got so loose, requiring me to release the throttle to regain track.

    Ok, Let’s get to the problem . . . .

    Steering - The steering is one of the Ryker’s worst traits. While you can live with poor suspension, excessive rpm, heat and noise, the steering on a forward trike has to be correct. No matter how you twist it - the Ryker’s steering is poorly designed and can be un-safe at highway speeds.

    Let me explain why - Unlike the Spyder which uses electro-mechanical steering system, the Ryker for cost reasons, is solely mechanical in operation. This means, when the Ryker’s stationary or moving slow, the steering takes considerable force to move.
    As you reach a speed of 30-40 mph, the steering becomes manageable and “effort-wise” feels somewhat like a F3. However, as you increase the Ryker’s speed to 55 or so, the steering becomes over-sensitive, and becomes difficult to keep the bike in check, especially on rough road surfaces. While cruising down a “smooth” interstate at 65 feels OK, any roads with imperfections or slab concrete gaps, or curves can truly test your abilities.

    Let’s compare the Ryker’s steering to the Spyder!

    Both the Ryker and Spyder are equipped with a vehicle stability system - Called; VSS. The VSS processor’s main goal is to prevent the bike from tipping in a turn, serve as a brake anti-lock system, and provide traction control. VSS monitors the speed of all three tires, engine speed, yaw movement, throttle position and steering position, to monitor the bikes movements. While both the Ryker and Spyder have a VSS stability systems, the Ryker lacks the important electric steering motor to make the steering operate properly.

    Here’s a brief description how it works.

    Slow Speed - Unlike a 2 wheel bike, due to the design of a forward trike and its steering linkages, it can take a lot of strength to move the steering when navigating out of parking lot. During slow speeds or when a Spyder is stationary, the electric servo motor mechanically provides the movement or torque needed, so the rider can effortlessly to move the steering.

    Highway Speed - This is where a major difference occurs. As you increase speed with the “Spyder”, the VSS processor talks to the steering's processor to begin decreasing assist or torque to the steering “proportionally” as the bike increases its speed. This itself, is the key factor that prevents the steering from being over-sensitive, to avoid over-steer or loss of control. Through the use of accelerometers for yaw and speed and wheel sensors, the Spyder’s VSS processor may actually reduce the riders steering inputs in a turn, if his speeds to high.

    During highway Speeds - Aside VSS reducing steering's sensitivity, the servo motor also has the ability to provide “Opposing Torque” to the rider, to actually make it harder for him to turn the steering to make the bike more stable.

    The Spyder’s “electronic” VSS - Works in conjunction with a “mechanical” feature called “Positive Camber Angle”. By rotating the Spyder or Ryker’s front axle’s axis off center, this offset camber causes the wheels to “self-steer” back to their center position. In a remote way, this force is sort of like a buggies caster wheels at the grocery store, forward motion, keeps the wheels pointed forward. Regardless, of the servo motor input, or the riders input on the bars, both the Spyder and Ryker’s positive camber angle is continuously trying to self-steer the bike to its true center, to keep the steering centered. Since the Ryker has no electric steering system, and lacks this ability to reduce steering effort at high speeds. The result is the over-sensitive steering “over-powers” the cambers offset abilities to keep the tires centered to the bike.

    To show just how stable and desensitized the F3 steering is at highway speeds - In the video below, I forcefully turn the steering hard in both directions. Thanks to the F3’s desensitized electric steering and its camber offset, the camber self-steers the F3 back to center position after each input and maintains good lane position.

    Video Link:

    http://www.rotory.com/bike/f3steer.mov

    A possible Scenario - Is a deer jumps out in front of your Ryker and your reflex quickly turns the bar. Should this happen, you just created another problem, as the Ryker over-steers, it causes both tires to lose their track.
    Making matters worse, the VSS will react with a braking action on only one wheel, to get the tire back down, this additionally forces the bike from its original track even further. This same over-steer event, also upsets the rear tires track at the same moment. This problem is compounded many times over on wet surfaces. This same deer incident while riding a Spyder, would be totally different, since the electric steering is so desensitized at highway speeds, when the rider “Over-Reacts” to the deer, instead of a quick motion upsetting the track, the steering reacts in a manner to retain traction. In a way, this is sort of like anti-lock brakes, instead of sliding the tire, it applies braking (steering) smoothly to retain control.

    As shown on the F3 video - You can actually move the steering back and forth 2-3 inches right to left, and the Spyder steering resists over-steer and applies the turn smoothly to retain traction. Between the Spyder’s electric steering holding center position and the Spyder’s positive camber angle keeping the wheels straight, the F3 & RT offer near perfect high-speed handling in an emergency situation.

    Let’s look at some other things that effect the Ryker’s handling.

    Ryker’s Low CG Position - To help deal with the Ryker’s over-sensitive steering problem and to help reduce wheel-lift, BRP designed the Ryker with a lower CG position than the Spyder. While far from perfect, having the rider some 2-3 inches lower than the Spyder, provides a degree of stability. Both the weights location and height, means everything on a forward trike since everything above the tires, creates a roll motion during a turn, affecting the bikes handling.

    Rider’s Weight - The Ryker’s handling is greatly effected by the riders weight. By this, I mean a if you’re carving through some mountains and there’s a 80 lb. kid on a Ryker in front of you, let him go, because he is going to vanish in front of you, if your weight is 200+ lbs like me. Not so much because the bikes lighter, but because his lighter weight above the bikes belt-line contributes to a lower CG, and therefore less roll moment and better handling.

    2-Up Riding - The Ryker is at a major disadvantage during 2-Up riding. While adding a passenger to a Spyder F3 or RT reduces the bike’s handling somewhat, it does not make the bike unsafe, because the bikes additional weight, negates the passengers weight. However, adding a passenger to the Ryker, affects the CG and the bikes geometry, since most all the passenger weight is elevated higher then the driver and over tires, contributing to worsen the already marginal Ryker’s steering.

    Ryker’s Weight - Another reason the Ryker has poor handling, is it’s “Lack of Weight”. The F3 Spyder weighs 900-950 lbs, this applies more weight or pressure to each tire on the ground. Since the Ryker is considerably lighter, at only around 600 lbs., the result is there is “less weight” on each tire. This in itself, makes it easier to raise a tire and lose traction in a turn. Lack of sufficient weight on a forward trike, reduces the tires patch or contact to the road in a turn. This is also evident when driving over road imperfections, since it causes the front tires to lose track, slide in turns, or even wheel hop, as they negotiate each bump.

    Rear Traction - This same lack of bike weight on the Ryker also creates a traction problem for the rear tire. While most guys acquaint the Ryker’s burn out to power, tire spin is mostly caused by a lack of weight on the rear tire. As we discussed, by adding the weight of a heavy rider, it works in against the Ryker, since the riders weight is located above the tires, it results in a roll moment, rather than a down force in a turn as the weight of the bike does.

    Transmissions - Both the Spyder and Ryker offer totally different transmissions. The Ryker uses a CVT design and the Spyder uses a standard gear box design which is shifted either manually or semi-automatically.

    CVT - While BRP has been very successful with CVT transmissions in their off-road equipment. When it comes to motorcycles, CVT transmissions are basically old news. CVT drives are presently reserved more for scooter platforms with smaller engines, considerable less weight, and less torque. While I’m sure BRP’s decision to use a CVT is for cost reasons, The CVT might be the Ryker’s weak link in the drive train. Nearly every scooter with a CVT transmission suffers with numerous clutches and belt failures and require constant maintenance. Aside from belt and clutch wear with CVT systems, most CVT drives experience a 15% power loss compared to a geared transmission.

    Gearing - The by product of a CVT clutch is higher than normal rpm when compared to a gear-box bike. While I’m fully aware the 900 produces max torque at 7,000 rpm, few riders (or bystanders) will want to hear the Ryker’s engine running near wide open, as you cruise though a quiet rural town at 35 mph.

    On my Ride - The Ryker’s screaming engine noise was a major negative. Level-wise, it louder than my Kubota Zero turn diesel mower. Unlike a geared transmission of the Spyder with its wet clutch operation, the down side of a CVT clutch system is the engine has to rev all the time, so regardless if you’re doing 30 mph through school zone, the engine is going nuts at 5-6,000 rpm. More advanced CVT clutches such as the one in my BMW 650 Sport, offers a stepped up higher ratio for highway use, to conserve fuel and reduce engine wear.

    The Ryker’s CVT / shaft drive system has excessively high rpm - Since the Ryker is 300 lbs lighter than the Spyder, it would seem logical it would be geared higher not lower. It’s my guess due to limited space, the Ryker’s compact CVT clutch (small diameter) limits the clutches ability for higher gearing. For this reason, touring won’t be one of the Ryker’s best assets. Running at interstate speeds, means the engine is turning around 6,000+ rpm. This same low gearing also contributes to reduced top speeds. During my high speed test, the only thing on my mind, was shifting to a higher gear.
    The best way to describe the Ryker’s excessive engine speed, would be for Spyder owners to drive their F3 or RT at 60 mph in 3rd gear for a few hours, this itself will cure any thoughts of owning a Ryker. Due to the Ryker’s overly high rpm, when compared to a Spyder, you can expect around 40% accelerated engine wear. In addition, you’ll have frequent fuel stops, thanks to a smaller tank and less fuel economy than a Spyder.

    Dual Clutch Transmission - While on the subject of transmissions, it’s been my hope for years, when a new Spyder would be released, it would offer a “Dual Clutch” transmission. Regretfully, BRP went in the wrong cheaper direction. While the Spyder’s transmission works OK, is getting a bit dated. Hopefully, BRP’s next Spyder’s will have a “Dual-Clutch” transmission such as Honda uses. What makes the Dual Clutch transmission so great, is it uses two separate clutches. The way it works, there is one clutch and spline for gears 1-3-5th gears, and another clutch 2-4-6th gears. This way, as you shift from 1st to 2nd, there is no gear movement or engagement, it just instantly releases the clutch on 1st gear and engages the clutch for 2nd. Unlike the Spyder, Dual Clutch transmissions can shift itself both up and down. In addition, they offer Drive and three “Sport” modes, where each mode spreads the shifts further apart and downshifts more aggressively. There’s also a full “Manual” mode which allows the rider to shift up and down him-self, but unlike the Spyder, the shifts are quicker, near silent and very, very smooth.
    I included a few image below of my 2014 Honda NM4, it’s equipped with Honda’s Dual Clutch transmissions. The NM4 is so aerodymcally correct, its 700cc engine gets up to 85 mpg.





    Noise - Another negative is the Ryker is extremely noisy. It’s a know fact, Rotax engines have always generated a lot of internal engine / timing chain noise. On the Ryker this noise is worse than a Spyder thanks to higher RPM and a lack of shrouding around the engine to isolate noise from the driver.

    Vibration - Along with high rpm’s comes increased high frequency vibration. The Ryker has considerably more vibration than a Spyder. On both the Ryker’s I drove, all the panels and side covers were constantly rattling. On one machine, vibration broke off the hoods hinge, allowing it to flop around.

    Heat - Due to the fact the rider is sitting almost behind the engine, means most of the engine and radiator heat flows straight back on the rider. I can easily say, there was 2-3 times more hot air than a F3. While the Ryker will be great for winter, on my ride with 95 degree heat, It felt like the bike was on fire!

    Here's a few more minor problems:


    Wheel Removal - Ryker has a terrible wheel removal process. Don’t take your Ryker to just any bike shop for tire change because they won’t know what to do with it.
    Instead of the usual lug nuts to remove the wheel, for reasons unknown, BRP decided to change it for the worse. Therefore, you’ll need to carry a long breaker bar, a torque wench, and a 65mm 12 point socket, to get the tire off and back on. Along with the new attaching method, comes a new way to mount the wheel and brake assembly. There are now three small pins which secure the brakes to the wheel. Making matters worse, those “Pretty Red” locking clips, to retain the wheel nut from spinning off, are coming loose. While t he clips are there to prevent the nut from turning, should this happen, the nut easily pulls the clip loose. BRP’s fix is a use of a plastic tie-wrap to help hold the clip to the axle. In any case, I recommend finding a stainless pin to lock the nut. There has been a few mishaps, where incompetent dealers installed the wheels incorrect, shearing the pins off. It also appears as if BRP did not provide the special sockets needed to the dealers to install the wheels in assembly, so they were just tightening the nut hand tight to get the clip in. keep your eye on your wheels guys!

    To Sum it Up - I feel after the new craze wears down and word gets out on the Ryker’s problems, these bikes will clutter Can Am showrooms. As of now, the potential buyer for a Ryker is a new guy who lacks forward trike knowledge, and has nothing to compare the Ryker to anything he's driven.

    If you’re considering a Ryker - It’s important to note, there is only $3-4,000 separating a striped down Ryker Rally, from a Spyder F3, and the Spyder is light years advanced over the Ryker. In fact, if you were to add better shocks and a few goodies to a Ryker, you would be close to the same price as a F3. Right now there is some super deals on 2018 F3 Spyders.



    Unlike the Ryker - With a Spyder F3, there is nothing else to buy. You get all the needed components to make the bike work, such as a real 6 speed manual or auto transmission, instead of a troublesome CVT belt drive. The F3 has a larger more advanced engine, which is faster, quieter, and more economical than the Ryker. The F3 has great suspension and shocks, plus an electric power steering unit, so the F3 is safer and easier to drive. When it comes to the looks department, unlike the boxy squared off design of the Ryker, an F3 with its painted open bars and sleek styling, appears to be moving before you even start the engine.

    In Conclusion - I was really looking forward to driving a Ryker home. Regretfully, for myself, there were far to many short comings. The real deal breaker for me was Ryker’s weak suspension and poor handling, there is no way I’m putting Linda on the back of a Ryker. While the Ryker’s price seems attractive at first, when you really look at what you’re getting for the money, the Ryker is far from a good deal, especially when you consider you can own a real forward trike, like the Spyder F3 for a few thousand more.

    Ride Safe - Mike




    About the Author
    - Mike has worked in the aviation industry for over four decades. To his credit, he solely designed, built and developed a project called “Heli-Cam” the world’s first successful FPV controlled “Aerial Drone” with a payload up to 245 lbs. and a rotor span of 19 feet, designed for Military Front-Line warfare use. This project led to contracts and flight services for firms such as; Martin Marietta Aerospace, Night Vision Labs, ADAT’s, Hughes Helicopter, Bell Helicopter, US Border Patrol, FBI, US Army, Drug Enforcement as well as consulting and flight services for numerous companies world wide. In private sector, Mike pioneered the first electric powered helicopter, a concept utilized in every drone today. Mike also designed the first professional Motion Picture filming and aerial surveillance drone platform, which led to contracts with the motion picture industry, and flew platforms for National Inquire Magazine and others. Mike was also Publisher & Editor for 19 years of a leading helicopter publication titled - Rotory Modeler Magazine.



    Last edited by IdleUp; 07-12-2019 at 05:58 PM.
    Military Drone Designer & Pilot
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  2. #2
    Very Active Member Sarge707's Avatar
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    Your Pretty tough on the Ryker??? I have both and Love both and it would be almost impossible for ME to give One Up for the other.
    2015 F3 sm6, Custom Dynamics fender lights.

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    Customer Support LeftCoast's Avatar
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    While I am typically skeptical of any article that is written to "point out the shortcomings" I have never ridden a Ryker so it will be interesting see what others think.
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    Customer Support LeftCoast's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarge707 View Post
    Your Pretty tough on the Ryker??? I have both and Love both and it would be almost impossible for ME to give One Up for the other.
    I don't know if the reviewer is the same as the poster or just something the OP found.
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  5. #5
    Thinks out loud Jeriatric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeftCoast View Post
    I don't know if the reviewer is the same as the poster or just something the OP found.
    The OP is the reviewer as noted in his about me.


    Identify what you have control over and find peace with what you don't.

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    I appreciate all your work in the lengthy write up. You bring up many points. I would like to add my own review ( maybe like a little P.S to yours) after only 1500 miles it's a little shorter. I like it. It's fun. The more miles I do the better the handling seems to get... or perhaps I'm getting better. Looks are subjective like the different between an M-4 and a M-1... sexy is something different to each person. I do think it's important for people to think through a buy of any size and a Ryker is no different. My advice and it's worth just what you are paying for it, go ride both. Much like the M-4 or M-1, either the Ryker or Spyder will capture your imagination and your heart. The rest is just details and idiosyncrasies that you learn to live with. The main thing is; get up, get out, go ryde. And be safe.

  7. #7
    Customer Support LeftCoast's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerbear View Post
    The OP is the reviewer as noted in his about me.
    Agreed, picked up on that too late, plus he started another thread prior to his test ride.
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  8. #8
    aka: akspyderman ARtraveler's Avatar
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    Also cannot comment about the Ryker specifically. Have not owned or been on one.

    The article is very negative on pretty much everything Ryker. If I were thinking of buying one...the article would have a big influence on my decision. I would however, at least make a test drive so that I would not be depending on just one person's input.

    So...at this point I and the other mods will let this one ride for a bit and ask for others opinions on what they have experienced. The secret here, is no name calling, no arguing with others. Opinions on both sides of the aisle are welcome...until the attacks start. Then...well you know.

    Based on what I have gleaned since Ryker came out...they fill a niche, people seem to like them...and there has not been a lot of negativity posted about the brand. In another thread when it was asked about what people "thought" was bad about Ryker...there were actually some objections to the threads intent.

    For now...
    Last edited by ARtraveler; 07-13-2019 at 10:09 AM.

    Currently Owned: 2011 RT A&C SE5 (magnesium), 2014 RTS-SE6 (yellow), 2015 Vulcan 900 LTD

    Previously : 2008 GS-SM5 (silver), 2009 RS-SE5 (red), 2010 RT-S Premier Editon #474 (black) Pictures of 2008 and 2009 Spyders are in Alaska Albums 2009 and 2010.
    5 Spyders, 10 years, 145,375 miles


  9. #9
    Active Member SpyderCruiser's Avatar
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    It is like your tool box, each tool has a specific purpose. For Meg and I an RTL is the right tool for our riding style. If riding alone a Ryker might be an enjoyable tool for that purpose. As others said they own and like both. If I rode alone and for buzzing around town, I bet the Ryker would be fun. But only room for 1 bike in the stable so the RTL fits the bill for us.. the right tool for the job.

  10. #10
    Thinks out loud Jeriatric's Avatar
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    Mike's critique is his honest evaluation.

    However, comparing the handling characteristics of Karmann Gia to a Porsche, isn't really fair. Is it?

    That's just my opinion. It and 5 bucks will get you a beer most anywhere.


    Identify what you have control over and find peace with what you don't.

  11. #11
    Active Member Cobwebs's Avatar
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    Thing is they were built to attract another demographic and as there is no competing brand BRP can pretty much add and subtract features without penalty to the sales/profits.
    Ryker is the gateway drug as I see it but the huge discounts on run out model F3's make them seem overpriced or under engineered depending on your view.

  12. #12
    Very Active Member Highwayman2013's Avatar
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    I'm seriously considering one soon and have already ridden one. The OP makes no mention of alignment which would make it twitchy at speed. Comparing a product that is in it's first year to one that has been out far longer isn't very fair and comparing a machine that is in it's 11th year to a Gold Wing? Please.
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    I would say this review is very biased and written by a rider who clearly loves his F3. Glad you like your F3 but that doesn't mean you have to "hate" on the Ryker. It's clearly not the best bike for you but might be the best bike for others. I'd say based on your review and the language used that you're a proud F3 owner that feels VERY threatened by the Ryker.

    Owning both a Ryker Rally and Spyder RS I can say that most of the things you talk about simply aren't true.

    Yes, the Ryker has a CVT with a bit of shaft clunk but I would in no way say it's detrimental to the bike. In fact the "clunk" happens quite infrequently and is really nothing more than an annoyance at times. Not a safety issue, just a quirk of the design.

    Compared to the 998 twin in the RS the Ryker actually spins at a lower RPM at the same MPH speed.

    You spend a lot of time talking about how bad the steering and handling on Ryker is but I just haven't had this experience. 1800 miles and I have found no issues in the steering or handling areas. The Ryker handles and steers every bit as well as the RS on smooth or rough paved and dirt roads at any of the speeds I've traveled. I typically ride in the 60-80 range but ocassionally top it out (105mph) when I feel the need.

    I've had no issues with front or rear traction. The front ends sticks just fine in the turns on rough and smooth pavement. The rear end only breaks lose if I chose to give it enough throttle to do so. Again I'd say the traction front and rear is the same as the RS.

    I've had no heat issues at all and honestly I follow 3 different Ryker Facebook pages and Spyder Lovers and I have not seen any complaints of heat except from you.

    The Ryker does vibrate a fair amount at idle, more than the RS but once the clutch engages the vibration is gone. Not something that has been a bother for me.

    The comfort of the Ryker ride is not as good as the RS. I'm not sure if that's because of the shock/spring package or the design or the seating position or a combination of things. The comfort isn't terrible, just not as good as the RS. Could I put 500 miles on the Ryker in a day? Not sure, I haven't tried. I know I can do 250 miles and my body feels just fine. I know I can do 1100 miles on my RS in 18 hours (iron butt ride) with no issues.

    You also talk about how "weird" the Ryker styling is but really that's a 100% opinion thing. A person could just as easily say the same thing about an F3 or an RT. I think it's fair to say most Ryker buyers probably have very little interest in an F3 or RT. This lack of interest has very little to do with price difference and much more to do with meeting the riders needs and the demographic they are in.

    Overall I like my Ryker. I wouldn't say its better or worse than my RS. It's just different. Each one has pros and cons but that doesn't make one better or worse than the other. I still enjoy riding both and feel very confident on both.

    I do like the orange color of your F3 and wish they offered the Ryker in that color.

  14. #14
    Active Member IdleUp's Avatar
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    Hello all & Thanks for all the replies both positive and negative. All my comments are 100% factual in every respect. My only focus in writing the article is only to help other riders understand the Ryker’s weaknesses.

    All these problem are open and visible to anyone, you don’t have to read my report to easily confirm these for yourself.

    Regards - Mike
    Last edited by ARtraveler; 07-13-2019 at 09:29 AM. Reason: Points from the review repeated. Do not need the information twice.
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    I think you need to understand all your points are factual in your mind as they are your opinions. Reality and opinions are not always the same thing and as others have said opinions are like *******s.....we all have one. Not discounting your opinions, just don't agree with them 100%.
    Last edited by ARtraveler; 07-13-2019 at 09:31 AM. Reason: Edited out the repeat of the OP original post. No need to repeat the same review twice

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    I have only test ridden the Ryker and I can say that I found it severely lacking compared to a Spyder. I know that those that have it will usually defend it because they bought it. I am not in the demographic that the Ryker was intended for so my thoughts apparently don't count either. It is noisy, it is hot (I rode it on a day when the temps were about 96 degrees), it did have twitchy steering, maybe not as drastic as was mentioned but I am used the the Spyder. If you don't mind those things it is really as was stated "Fun" and would be a good choice (in my opinion) as a bar hopper... (better than a two wheeler because if you get a buzz it shouldn't tip over on you). I also am not impressed with the design, but that is always a personal thing... as I have a SlingShot and like it where the reviewer did not.... Anyways... just my two cents..
    When the going gets tough...Downshift..

  17. #17
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    Hey Mike, regardless of all other comments, this is the absolute best and most honest, non biased Review of any Can-Am Product I have ever read on this Forum! Your Credentials are impressive, along with your Hands on, Butt on, as well as Mechanical Design experience is concerned! I am a Fan of TRUTH, with out the B.S. icing added, as most Venders of Can-Am products add to Spyder and Ryker reviews. As a potential Customer, ready, willing and able to pull the Trigger on purchasing a Ryker, and ready to put your money where your mouth was, I would steer clear of Rykers like a bad Dream after reading your honest Professional Review. Of course, after owning a new 2012 RT Limited, and a new 2016 RT Limited, and logging close to 90,000 miles on them, plus owning in the past, a BRP Ski-Doo Snow Sled, I recognized quickly the Ryker was very similar to a Ski-Doo on wheels. In fact, I met one on the Blue Ridge Parkway in Virginia this morning, and it sounded exactly like my old BRP Snow Sled sounded like on the Trail. If I was a first time Buyer ready to pull the Trigger on my first Can-Am Trike, I would find a way to beg, borrow, or steal the extra few Grand to buy a used low mileage 2014 and up RT or F. With all of the Pros and Cons you brought out in comparing the Ryker with the RT and F, I think you were only too kind to the Ryker. When I first entered the Market and paid full market price for my 2012 RT Limited, even that comparison in price was 3X what a new Ryker costs, and used low mileage 2012 RTs are available on eBay now for close to the same money as the Ryker Rally.
    Last edited by CopperSpyder; 07-14-2019 at 09:35 AM.

  18. #18
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    Hello - Just because the Ryker has shortcomings in its design, does not mean the bike is unusable or owners should get rid of them. If you’re considering a Ryker, at least now you’ll know the score up front, this makes you a more informed buyer. If you already own a Ryker, keep riding and enjoying the bike. For the most part, the Ryker is a blast to ride. Aside from the steering issue, if you keep your eye on Ryker’s wheel attaching hardware and CVT drive-line lash, you should be OK.

    Keep in mind, its threads such as this one and the communication that follows, which informs the BRP there is problems with the bike, so they can make future improvements where everyone benefits.

    It's important to note the new Ryker is not a new bike designed for Spyder owners to upgrade to. BRP designed the Ryker for the sole purpose to get 2 wheel riders on 3 wheels. The only way to “lure” new buyers, was to offer a 3 wheel bike for 2 wheel money. If you’ve been riding bikes any time at all, then you already know, you don’t get much for $10K in a two wheel bike, surely you’ll get far less buying a trike for that amount.

    The “Success” of BRP’s new Ryker Marketing Program depends solely on the fact that Ryker buyers will have no knowledge of forward trikes to make a judgement calls on its worthiness. The second “phase” of this Ryker program is to move Ryker owners up the food chain and buy a Spyder to make up for dwindling sales.

    If I can leave potential Ryker buyers with some good advise. If you go down to ride a Ryker, make it mandatory that you also ride a F3. Spend some time on both bikes then compare features.
    In doing so, you’ll have something to compare the Ryker to. While I realize the F3 is more money, only $3-4K separates these two bikes, the F3 is light years ahead in technology, ride and safety.

    Regards - Mike
    Last edited by IdleUp; 07-13-2019 at 02:11 PM.
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  19. #19
    Active Member Many brands's Avatar
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    WOW.. I am considering a Ryker. I have not test rode one yet - but will certainly keep in mind, all of the 'items' you brought up. I have a RT and with two up it is great. But I am thinking the Ryker would be fun to just run about - one up. So - again, when my test ride happens - I feel more confident, and more engaged, in what to look for, and be aware of.
    Thanks for your review.

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    This is not fact but my opinion. After 45000 miles on a 2015 Spyder ST Limited, I "traded down" to a Ryker Rally. I now have over 6,000 miles on the Rally and all I can say is that I am extremely happy with my decision. That's it from me.

  21. #21
    Very Active Member chris56's Avatar
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    I leave here in the Alps - lot of hills and curves .. after 45.000 Spydermiles I just can say the Ryker is the better solution for roads like this ..

    thanks to the CVT transmission and the FOX shock absorber (with swaybar), the Ryker floats through the curves, the ups and downs of the old gearboxes is completely away - unbelievable (says my Girl !)
    ( and yes - we ryde a little faster as on our old ones)

    the ROTAX is strong enough to follow all the others uphill, but downhill no Spyder could follow a Ryker, the brake-system of the Ryker is so much "stronger" (for this low weight) ..

    and : I don`t know exact why this is so - its more fun with the Ryker to ride roads like this her. (sorry)

    I reach now the 6.000 miles and never saw my dealer, also new for me in my olds Spyder-times - lets see what BRP brings in the Future !!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oa52jYfIZiU
    Ryker 900 - Fox-shock - TOYO - larger shield - 2up & a topace

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    Good hard facts Mike, I still don't need one or want one. Thanks for your write up. T.P.

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    I have already replied to IdleUp's other post on the same darn subject and don't have the energy to do it all over again - except to say that I disagree with his criticism and am extremely happy so far performance, handling and price wise with the Ryker that I purchased 3/4 months ago!

    And I have ridden the F3!

    So I am not sure of the poster's mission but from my experience so far the Ryker should be a very successful launch for BRP.

    I could list my credentials - but don't wish to bore y'all!

  24. #24
    Active Member 007james's Avatar
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    For you Guys & Gals that are hyping your Rykerís Off Road and Mud capabilities, as well as Street transportation and fun, I canít imagine how any one could compare buying a Ryker for Off Road Trail riding ,when for almost the same money, you could but the Outlander!

    https://www.atv.com/manufacturer/can...000r-xt-review

    Also, I canít imagine why Rykers are Highway legal in the U.S., whereas Outlanders, and all 4 wheeled ATVs are not considered Road Worthy, and as safe as many of the 4 Wheel ATVs built by Kawasaki, Polaris, John Deere, as well a Can-Am. I canít imagine, in my worst Nightmare, riding a Ryker on ANY Rush Hour City Freeway traffic on a Friday afternoon in Los Angeles, Houston, Chicago, New York, Atlanta, Boston, or any where around these busy Cities on ANY of the Freeways, as compared to being on a Spyder RT or F. I am really amazed that Rykers are even considered safe enough to legalize for highway and Freeways transportation in the United States, at least, while All ATVs like the Outlander are not only illegal on public highways, and need to be trailed to Off Road Trails to ride, while Rykers can be ridden on busy Freeways and taken off road to compete with ATVs on Trails full of mud , rocks, and water. Yes, no doubt, Rykers do have their nitches and places, but Freeways and Off Road Trails seem a bit like trying to fit square blocks in to round holes. Credentials are not the only requirements needed to see what Mike tried to enlighten Entry level Spyder riderís attention to. Common sense and just a little imagination of comparing my Spyder RT Limited and the Ryker on Freeway Rush Hour Traffic in Houston or L.A.,
    on a Friday Night or Lining your Rykers up with a Group of ATVs like the Outlander and other 4x4 s, ready to hit the mud and rocks of any off road trail. Just saying. Maybe its just Mike & Me, and a few others who have not changed who we were, before we became enlightened regarding Rykers, but just identified who we are not. ( no Credentials needed. Just Common Sense.)

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaxfann View Post
    I have already replied to IdleUp's other post on the same darn subject and don't have the energy to do it all over again - except to say that I disagree with his criticism and am extremely happy so far performance, handling and price wise with the Ryker that I purchased 3/4 months ago!

    And I have ridden the F3!

    So I am not sure of the poster's mission but from my experience so far the Ryker should be a very successful launch for BRP.

    I could list my credentials - but don't wish to bore y'all!

  25. #25
    Active Member Wahrsuul's Avatar
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    Side by sides aren't road legal as they'd be considered "cars" and therefore have to have all the appropriate safety equipment. You can make a side by side road legal in many states its been done here in SC - but they list them as "home built" or "RV" like the VW Dune buggies. They Ryker follows bike rules so can get away with less. As for the validity of the review - it's just like any review, worth everything you paid for it. It's his opinion and you can take it or leave it.

    I looked at Rykers, but don't care for the looks much. That alone was enough to keep me off them. When the RT is paid for, I may look for an F3 for solo riding, or maybe we'll upgrade to the latest RT.
    2014 RT-S Orange - LED headlights/driving lights, LED under mirror turns, LED brake/run lights along trunk and saddlebags, LED third brake light, LED turn bulb replacements, Voltmeter, Oil PSI gauge, heated gear connection, BRP backrest, dash Mount USB plug.

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