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  1. #1
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    Default New to Spyder ..2011 RT

    Hello, I am new to this forum and just purchased a 2011 RT with 352 miles on it.
    This unit is clean and honestly does look show room condition.

    How would you recommend I make sure all the recalls and updates were performed on the vehicle? I assume a local dealer in Arizona can check that for me. What else should I be aware of?? Any thoughts would be appreciated.....

  2. #2
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    Default I just pulled the trigger on a Brand new 2011 spyder RT

    I am new to this forum and brand new to Spyder. I just purchased a 2011 Spyder RT with 352 miles on it. Yes, it does look factory new and it has a clean title. My question is, how can I make sure all the factory recalls and computer updates were performed on this unit? I assume a good dealer in Arizona should be able to handle this. What else should I consider thinking about or
    Doing with this machine before I put her through the paces?

  3. #3
    Very Active Member Chupaca's Avatar
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    Default Welcome, welcome 👍

    Welcome to the spyder world and this awesome site. You can have the dealer check with your vin# for all recalls, bulletins, updates. Do to the time I would go through and change all the fluids and filters. Not knowing much on its use and storage check tires for dry rot pressure etc. Check belt for tension and alignment. If not yourself dealer should be able to do a full check for you....
    Gene and Ilana De Laney
    Mt. Helix, California

    ​2012 RS sm5

  4. #4
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    Default

    Thank you! I am excited but a bit nervous as I want to really use this for a year and then upgrade to a 2017 or 2018 but I wanted to give this a try first.

  5. #5
    Active Member Raprider's Avatar
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    Default

    and
    Raprider (Rich)

    2016 Can-Am Spyder ST-S SE5 Steel Black Metallic (Blackbird)
    BRP Audio, Heated Grips, Fog Lights, Passenger Backrest, Givi Saddlebags/Top Case
    BajaRon Swaybar, Wide-Vu Mirrors, Lamonster Ram mount and X-grip, Sena 20S Evo Dual

    1996 Yamaha Virago 750 (Vera) - still riding
    1987 Honda Shadow 500 (Shady) - sold
    1982 Honda Rebel 250 (Little Reb) - sold


  6. #6
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    Default

    I will post a pic....it is being delivered tonight......

  7. #7
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael3million View Post
    Thank you! I am excited but a bit nervous as I want to really use this for a year and then upgrade to a 2017 or 2018 but I wanted to give this a try first.
    Congratulations on your new ride. I wouldn't be too hasty at going for a 2017 or later bike, there is a few disadvantages to the 1330cc bikes relative to the 998 V-twin. However, the brakes on your 998cc could be better, as in not as good at stopping you as they could be, take care until you get used to them.

    With regard to what to check, look carefully and closely at the tyres, push at the tread with a screwdriver, they are prone to deterioration in the form of multiple small surface cracking of the tread rubber. If you find this is the case change them out for safety. Obviously an engine oil and filter change and also a transmission filter would be a good idea. There's all sorts of stuff you could do but I'd bet all else is ok and it just needs riding.

    Edit: It may well be worth greasing the front inner suspension bushes, after so long the grease is likely to be dried out, greasing is easy, replacing the bushes is a pest.
    Last edited by Spyderlass; 06-07-2019 at 02:15 PM. Reason: Extra info..

  8. #8
    Very Active Member CopperSpyder's Avatar
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    Default

    on the new ride! I hope you enjoy it. If you don't know when the last time the oil and filters were changed do that and look at the tires make sure they are good, if they are the originals then you will need to change them soon. As for the mileage if that is correct (a lot of time the cluster have to be changed and the mileage starts at 0 again) will mean you are still in the break in period so go easy for a while. Read your manual. But I think the Cluster has probably been changed. your local dealer can check that for you. Good luck with you new ride. Live to Ride, Ride to Live.

  9. #9
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    Default

    Could you elaborate on the advantages and disadvantages of the 1330 relative to the 998?

    Many Thanks!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bhemedinger View Post
    Could you elaborate on the advantages and disadvantages of the 1330 relative to the 998?

    Many Thanks!
    I guess that is aimed at me since I mentioned it earlier.

    I guess it's a IMHO case but I came from a 998 RT to 1330 RT and missed some of the characteristics of the 998 when I changed. If I was buying another RT, I would definitely consider finding a low miles 998 and upgrading its week points to get the best of both bikes. My partner has has two 1330RT's so, including mine I've dealt with three 1330RT's and they've all had similar characteristics and poor points.

    I very much liked the V-twin engine. I'm 70 and been around engines since I was wee and the V-twin is the only petrol (gas) engine I've ever come across where the throttle could be fully opened at any revs and the engine pull hard without flatting off from too much throttle, even at low revs. There is the V-twin burble of course, which is good but a little V-twin vibe too - I was fine with it but others may feel different about that.
    The 1330 engine is generally buzzy; it has a vibration at low revs which will shake the bike, about 1400 to 2000 ish revs. Opening the throttle slowly in neutral will vibe the bike until the revs rise enough and then it smoothes out nicely. Unfortunately, you pass through this point every time you move away from standstill; it's normally only fleeting because you're accelerating away but irritating nevertheless and if one happens to be constantly moving away slowly, such as in a traffic queue, it's a pest. I have got used to it and am relaxed with it but that doesn't mean it's gone away.

    The 1330 has 6 gears and the 998 just 5 gears - for me, 6 gears it's just another gear I've got to change but it's needed to make the bike as fast as the 998 is, and it doesn't quite manage it either! The top speed of the 998 is less than the 1330 so it runs out of steam at the top end but it's a quick, sharp motor everywhere else.

    The 998 has better handling front suspension and it can be improved further, as can the 1330 but not up to the 998 standard. I can only speak about my 998 but it had solid but lubricated front suspension wishbone bushes which gives a good, firm location for the wishbones so the front end was under good control. The down side was they needed greasing as a service procedure - not difficult, just something to be done. On the other hand, the 1330 has rubber bushes which don't need lubricating but give very poor location for the front suspension. Also, my 998 had adjustable preload front dampers (shock absorbers) which allowed setting of ride height and stiffness for different riders' weights and front trunk loading. The 1330 has fixed dampers.

    The first 1330 my partner had was 2014 year and it had a DESS failure and it left us stranded, the other two 1330's are later years and, so far, have been fine. We carry a spare. If you are considering an early 1330RT then bear the DESS issue in mind.

    All three 1330's have had brake issues - to be more accurate the brakes are fine but the hub mounting face - where the brake disc mounts - is inaccurately machined and has too great a run-out so the discs sit canted at an angle which eventually causes uneven wear of the disc surfaces with the consequent juddering, vibrating braking that, reading this board, appears to be a common fault.
    I say the brakes are fine but in reality the brakes are just adequate on the 1330RT, however, on the 998 they're pretty awful and care needs to be taken until one has adapted. There were a few times I thought I might not stop but did manage to, but it was a little alarming, nevertheless.

    The transmission did become a bit whiny in the low gears on the 998 as it racked up mileage but the 2014RT also became seriously noisey, engine and transmission rattled like a bag of nails. We got rid of it at 17k miles and the two others are fine so far.

    Now, how to improve both of them. Good front wheel alignment is crucial but to this end good front wheel control is also important otherwise while the front suspension is working the wheel alignment will change under load. This is where the 998 wins by not having rubber bush front wishbones. (You can test this on a 1330RT by standing by a front wheel, lean over the suspension to align the top and bottom wishbones by eye, now lift up on the front of the mudguard and watch the top wishbone move easily in misaligment to the bottom one - and this only under hand pressure, how the suspension moves when the bike is cranked up at speed in a bend and runs over a bit of road surface imperfection I can only imagine.) In this regard the 998 with its rigid bushes is superior but the steering tie-rods are too flexible, again pull up on one of them and watch the consequent wheel movement. The 1330 is better in this respect because the tie-rods are a larger diameter but they're made from aluminium tube which negates some of their increased diameter benefit. Both can be improved by fitting rigid tie-rods. Both can be improved by fitting suitable car tyres too, though my partner is happy with the Kendas now she had the rigid tie-rods and feels the front wheels' control is satisfactory - I still find it waney when I ride it though. (I use car tyres.)

    The upper front suspension ball joints have a short life and the tie-rod ends appear to vary considerably in tolerance from new, it's possible to get a nice tight one on one end of the tie-rod and one with play in it, straight from the factory! They need to be tight for good control.

    So, there you have it. I've likely missed some stuff which hasn't come to mind, if anything occurs to me I'll come back and post it.

  11. #11
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    Default

    Thank you!

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