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Thread: Coasting

  1. #1
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    Default Coasting

    I'm riding my new Ryker and loving it. There is a buzz coming from one of the plastic panels I'll need to find and fix, but I'm curious about the ability to coast. It seems to slow down pretty fast as soon as I release the gas--like the ability to coast at speed is almost non-existent and I'm not able to coast behind slow moving traffic without keeping some throttle on. My motorcycle, on the other hand, could coast a pretty fair distance before I'd have to twist the throttle again. I've had a shaft drive on a Honda before and it could coast pretty far, so I'm thinking the CVT transmission doesn't allow much coasting along?

    I've owned my Ryker for about 48 hours now and am still in the break-in period. I'm anxious to see what can really happen once I'm allowed to go full throttle on it!

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    Active Member Nobodyjj's Avatar
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    Just the nature of the CVT. On or off the gas. Ever been on a scooter? Get on the gas and vary the speeds, break in hard not easy.

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    Ozzie Ozzie Ozzie Peter Aawen's Avatar
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    It's the CVT - in layman's terms, it doesn't allow coasting at all! There's drive, & there's overdrive (or engine braking), & apart from those two which make up the 'GO' component of what CVT's can do, there's just stopped, or if you prefer, 'NO GO' ... which is what happens when you apply the brake & the CVT isn't turning fast enough to 'engage' the 'GO' feature!
    Last edited by Peter Aawen; 05-11-2019 at 07:10 PM. Reason: Sp
    2013 RT Ltd

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    aka: akspyderman ARtraveler's Avatar
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    I had one car with that feature. A 1966 Saab. They called it freewheeling. I used it no more than twice. I did not like being disconnected from the transmission when driving. It was similar to going down the road with the clutch depressed. That Saab had four on a tree.

    I am guessing you would not like that feature on a

    Currently Owned: 2011 RT A&C SE5 (magnesium), 2014 RTS-SE6 (yellow), 2015 Vulcan 900 LTD

    Previously : 2008 GS-SM5 (silver), 2009 RS-SE5 (red), 2010 RT-S Premier Editon #474 (black) Pictures of 2008 and 2009 Spyders are in Alaska Albums 2009 and 2010.
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    Owning other powersport vehicles that are not BRP and have a CVT I can say this. All the BRP vehicles I own with a CVT slow down excessively when you let off the throttle. Other brands (Polaris to be specific) with a CVT do slow down when letting off the throttle but not to the same degree the BRP CVT does. The other brands allow you to "coast" more.

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    The way I ride, I’ll probably never have to replace brake pads. cueman

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    Very Active Member Chupaca's Avatar
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    Default Not happening....

    Those transmissions do not have a free wheeling feature so you pretty much have to get used to it. Don't have one but do wonder if you shut the motor off at speed will it coast or will the wheel spin still keep the engine going using the compression slow down....
    Gene and Ilana De Laney
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    On the Ryker's CVT 'Tranny' as in most ATV's, Side by Sides and most Scooters there are two pulleys. One on the engine and one on the simple forward-reverse transmission that is connected directly to the drive shaft. Both pulleys change their effective diameter as a function of their RPM that changes as centrifugal force acts on fly weights pressing against springs in the respective pulleys. This change in pulley diameter results in the gear ratio changing from initially very low (low or 1st gear) as in first starting out. As speed is increased, the pullys effective diameter changes, again as the RPM creates more centrifugal to act on the flyweight/spring assembly of the pulleys increases resulting in a "higher gear".

    As one lets off the gas to slow down, the pulley RPM decreases again acting on the pulley effective diameter thusly automatically shifting to a lower gear, ie automatically down shifting.

    Clear as mud, I know..... Ask questions. The Ryker will not free wheel.
    Dean O
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    Very Active Member oldgoat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Rodriguez View Post
    Owning other powersport vehicles that are not BRP and have a CVT I can say this. All the BRP vehicles I own with a CVT slow down excessively when you let off the throttle. Other brands (Polaris to be specific) with a CVT do slow down when letting off the throttle but not to the same degree the BRP CVT does. The other brands allow you to "coast" more.
    I agree with you

    Suzuki Burgman 650......no coasting at all
    Suzuki Burgman 400.....coasting was much, much better
    Yamaha 400 scooter.....coasting was great.

    All 3 had CVTs. So there is a difference.
    2008 GS SM5, Full Moon Silver

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    Thanks for all the explanations. I understand what’s happening now.

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    I should think that since all CV transmissions basically work the same that maybe it is a matter of spring tension on the fly weights/balls (do they have balls? A Recluse clutch works like a CV transmission but uses balls...) My Vespa 'coasts' about the same as my Ryker, maybe a tad 'coastier.'

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    Active Member Tslepebull's Avatar
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    The parts diagram refers to them as "slider shoes" but the function is the same; they are centrifugal weights

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    I believe the backshifting is primarily the job of the secondary clutch. This duty would be performed by the helix and spring in the secondary. Different helix's and springs produce different backshifting results. They also have roller secondaries which offer much smoother operation. I'm not sure if the secondary clutch on the Ryker is a roller secondary? The point however is.......many of the clutch characteristics are adjustable by changing the weights, springs and helix. Most of the time from the factory the clutch is setup to give you the best performance over a broad range of RPM. You can tune the clutches though to give you faster acceleration, more or less backshift, etc. When you tune for a specific parameter other parameters suffer. As an example if you tune for faster acceleration you will lose top end speed.......if you tune backshifting for better coasting you'll lose quick pickup if you punch the throttle The clutching adjustment also has to work within the parameters of how the engine builds and delivers power. That's why typically a clutch kit is tied with an ECU flash.

    I'm no expert in any of this. It just stuff I've picked up after years of snowmobiling. It's complicated for sure. There are many companies that offer specific clutch kits for snowmobiles so riders can tune their sleds the way they like. The same could be done for the Ryker Here are some for the 900 Ace http://www.hotrodsledshop.com/skmxz900acec.html https://shop.rvsperformance.com/ACE-...CK-ACE-900.htm

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Rodriguez View Post
    I believe the backshifting is primarily the job of the secondary clutch. This duty would be performed by the helix and spring in the secondary. Different helix's and springs produce different backshifting results. They also have roller secondaries which offer much smoother operation. I'm not sure if the secondary clutch on the Ryker is a roller secondary? The point however is.......many of the clutch characteristics are adjustable by changing the weights, springs and helix. Most of the time from the factory the clutch is setup to give you the best performance over a broad range of RPM. You can tune the clutches though to give you faster acceleration, more or less backshift, etc. When you tune for a specific parameter other parameters suffer. As an example if you tune for faster acceleration you will lose top end speed.......if you tune backshifting for better coasting you'll lose quick pickup if you punch the throttle The clutching adjustment also has to work within the parameters of how the engine builds and delivers power. That's why typically a clutch kit is tied with an ECU flash.

    I'm no expert in any of this. It just stuff I've picked up after years of snowmobiling. It's complicated for sure. There are many companies that offer specific clutch kits for snowmobiles so riders can tune their sleds the way they like. The same could be done for the Ryker Here are some for the 900 Ace http://www.hotrodsledshop.com/skmxz900acec.html https://shop.rvsperformance.com/ACE-...CK-ACE-900.htm
    Excellent synopsis. I have no doubt that there will be after market options to tune a Ryker CVT Tranny to your Hearts content.
    Dean O
    Gran Pa Hoon
    Founder San Jose BMW
    Builder of the Motorcyclist Cafe Barn and Bunkhouse
    Copperhill, Tennessee

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    Thanks for the information. I was wondering about this also. I'm getting use to applying the brakes at all red lights, even though most times I can come to a complete stop without applying the brakes (which probably isn't a good ideal if someone is behind me.)

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    Hi all ref free wheeling I think its illegal in UK and can be dangerous Ryker is safe as always in gear regards Nico 75

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    Quote Originally Posted by ARtraveler View Post
    I had one car with that feature. A 1966 Saab. They called it freewheeling. I used it no more than twice. I did not like being disconnected from the transmission when driving. It was similar to going down the road with the clutch depressed. That Saab had four on a tree.

    I am guessing you would not like that feature on a
    Freewheeling or four on a tree? There are probably many who don't know what four on a tree is. We're showing our age with that. Dale

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