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  1. #176
    Active Member tehrlich's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peteoz View Post
    So Thornolis recommended 18psi originally for the Yokos, Tehrlich?

    Pete
    That's just where he set them initially. We've recently spoken about this, and he did not discourage me with my psi increase. I don't want to mistake his intentions, so I won't give details of our discussion. He can answer if he wishes.

    But, he doesn't have his set at 18 either.


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  2. #177
    Very Active Member jcthorne's Avatar
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    To me its a different strokes kind of thing unless there is something really unsafe going on. Not really the case here.

    Yes, I generally start folks off at 18 and 24 on the Yokos if they have never had them before.

    I run 26 to 28 in the front and 24 or so in the rear. Took me a while to get where I was most comfortable with them. I also ride a much lighter F3S compared to tehrlich's RT and our riding styles are obviously different. Does not make either really wrong. Does it really matter if the tires get every last mile they are capable of if the rider LIKES and is more confident with a slightly different pressure that is still well within the allowable range?

    I will say the higher pressures in the front do not seem to make the yokos balloon and wear in the center. They still wear even. The rear is a little more effected by the pressure on the wear pattern.

    I will also say that after a few thousand miles of Colorado twisties on the set of 3 yokos, they are a BIG step up from the Kenda's

    Blue Flame Spyder F3-S.

  3. #178
    Active Member tehrlich's Avatar
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    I spent the entire day running different psi's for my front Yokohamas S Avid 34.. I kept the rear at 26psi to keep a variable out of the equation. Didn't hit any highways, and maybe got to 50 on a straight stretch once.

    Texas has great roads in general, and it was warm (80's F,) and dry.

    There is no way in God's green earth I could run 17psi on the fronts. It is way too low in my opinion for the Yokohamas. On initial start up and turning (like maneuvering through a driveway,) you have to really wrench the wheels around to get it to turn. That's because the rolling resistance is higher. Then, on more aggressive turns, initiation of the turn is easy, but to continue the turn was much more difficult. As the centrifugal force engaged the outside tire, it made it more difficult to continue turning. A lot more muscle was needed to get it to finish the turn.

    At 25 psi's, a turn at initial movement is a lot easier. It doesn't feel like the front end is in quick sand. Night and day difference for a fast turn as well. It easily starts the turn, and less effort is required to finish the turn. It is easier to feather the radius of the turn, or finish it faster.

    I'm 6'3" and about 230lbs. I rarely rarely ride two up. 26psi for me upfront.

    While I was experimenting with the psi, I made a video of where I was riding. It's short.



    Fox Shocks - RonJon swaybar and links - BRP Comfort Seat - BRP Triaxis handlebars - Yokohama tires - Centramatic wheel balancers - BRP belt tensioner - BRP Short windshield - CAT delete - Lamonster footpegs - sintered brake pads - - Tricled lights

  4. #179
    Very Active Member BLUEKNIGHT911's Avatar
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    Default TIRE PRESSURE EXPERT ???????

    Quote Originally Posted by tehrlich View Post
    I spent the entire day running different psi's for my front Yokohamas S Avid 34.. I kept the rear at 26psi to keep a variable out of the equation. Didn't hit any highways, and maybe got to 50 on a straight stretch once.

    Texas has great roads in general, and it was warm (80's F,) and dry.

    There is no way in God's green earth I could run 17psi on the fronts. It is way too low in my opinion for the Yokohamas. On initial start up and turning (like maneuvering through a driveway,) you have to really wrench the wheels around to get it to turn. That's because the rolling resistance is higher. Then, on more aggressive turns, initiation of the turn is easy, but to continue the turn was much more difficult. As the centrifugal force engaged the outside tire, it made it more difficult to continue turning. A lot more muscle was needed to get it to finish the turn.

    At 25 psi's, a turn at initial movement is a lot easier. It doesn't feel like the front end is in quick sand. Night and day difference for a fast turn as well. It easily starts the turn, and less effort is required to finish the turn. It is easier to feather the radius of the turn, or finish it faster.

    I'm 6'3" and about 230lbs. I rarely rarely ride two up. 26psi for me upfront.

    While I was experimenting with the psi, I made a video of where I was riding. It's short.

    Warning ... to all NEWBIE's the above statements are .... Scientifically ... " FALSE "... if you want to believe what someone's Butt is saying ... you are putting yourself and any passengers in peril ..... Why this poster pursues this mis-information and appears to want others to follow His lead is beyond my comprehension .... Over-inflating car tires on a Spyder is a dangerous thing to do. The psi the manufactures list for CAR tires are based on vehicle weights above 3500lbs .... what does your Spyder weigh - 975 to 1150lbs .. so why would anyone use a psi meant for a veh. weighing 3 to 4 times as much..... I'm not saying this to upset anyone ... To me this is a Safety issue ... Over-inflated tires will lose traction much sooner than ones that are pressured for the vehicles weight, especially if it's wet ... Many here already know my credentials .... but for those that don't - I received Expert training in what tires do when in contact with pavement - wet or dry or other variations ... so beware of " well my Butt says " opinions. None of what I just said applies to KENDA tires .... Good luck, ride safe - ride happy ......... Mike ................PS, I'm not on an EGO trip about this topic, .. I am concerned about the Safety of all who are on this forum and will continue speak out when Anyone starts telling people something BAD is Good !!!!!!
    Last edited by BLUEKNIGHT911; 11-18-2017 at 12:12 AM.

  5. #180
    Active Member tehrlich's Avatar
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    Here we go again. More yelling. Fire and brimstone.


    Warning! NEVER ever tweak (not twerk) ANYTHING you may ride, drive, or sail! IT IS DANGEROUS to your butt.

    But it is more dangerous to overbearing know-it-alls because they may be WRONG! Just do what he says! He has more posts than me and that really matters!


    There is a RANGE of performance levels with air pressure in ANY tire: car, motorcycle, Spyder, and little red wagons. Everyone reading this KNOWS this. You don't have to be an expert witness or won first prize in a sanctioned drag race to inherently KNOW this. (I'll still race you with your soft shoes on, BTW.)

    I honestly spent one hour going through roads like in the video at 17psi on the fronts. The machine was sluggish and less responsive than at 25psi! If a deer jumps out of the bushes, I'll be glad to have a MORE RESPONSIVE tire to avoid it!

    I also did hard stops (on a safe stretch of road) with the 17psi vs. the 25psi. I found stopping distance about the same, BUT with the lower air pressure, I found it SQUIRRLEY as it stopped. We are riding a machine with TWO WHEELS upfront, and the physics of stopping will put a huge amount of vector force right on top of them! That's why they stop so well, NOT because of an 8psi difference in the tires.

    Readers should just try for themselves, and find out what they experience.


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  6. #181
    Active Member tehrlich's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcthorne View Post
    To me its a different strokes kind of thing unless there is something really unsafe going on. Not really the case here.

    Yes, I generally start folks off at 18 and 24 on the Yokos if they have never had them before.

    I run 26 to 28 in the front and 24 or so in the rear. Took me a while to get where I was most comfortable with them. I also ride a much lighter F3S compared to tehrlich's RT and our riding styles are obviously different. Does not make either really wrong. Does it really matter if the tires get every last mile they are capable of if the rider LIKES and is more confident with a slightly different pressure that is still well within the allowable range?

    I will say the higher pressures in the front do not seem to make the yokos balloon and wear in the center. They still wear even. The rear is a little more effected by the pressure on the wear pattern.

    I will also say that after a few thousand miles of Colorado twisties on the set of 3 yokos, they are a BIG step up from the Kenda's
    Exactly. NEWBIES.... just read this from Jim.

    Go to his website. Get work done by him. Understand that he knows a lot about Spyders, and physics.

    But, as far as I know, he has not won a sanctioned drag race. Readers can decide.


    Fox Shocks - RonJon swaybar and links - BRP Comfort Seat - BRP Triaxis handlebars - Yokohama tires - Centramatic wheel balancers - BRP belt tensioner - BRP Short windshield - CAT delete - Lamonster footpegs - sintered brake pads - - Tricled lights

  7. #182
    Active Member cruisinTX's Avatar
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    Default another choice

    The time has come for me to replace the rear tire on our 2014 RT Limited. I have read every post in this thread as well as some in other threads. I have also done considerable research on tires in general. Based on all of that (especially input from some of the more experience folks here), I have decided to listen to the beat of a different drummer. But the beat is only slightly different. I've ordered a Yokohama Envigor in 205/65R15. That's the "slightly different" part as there seems to be a lot of folks liking the Yokohamas but I have yet to see any mention of the Envigor. I also chose that particular size because of some feedback I got through private messages about correcting the speedometer error when using the Gerneral Altimax RT43 in 215/60. If I have calculated correctly, the 205/65 should have the speedo of an RT spot on at 70mph. The choice in that particular tread pattern was made based on several things like water-shedding design, UTQG rating (stickiness/softness) and size availability to name just a few.

    I'm hoping the tire will be here soon enough for me to get it mounted before Thanksgiving. If not, OH WELL. I do plan on reporting back here once I have a few thousand miles on it and maybe 10000 mile updates as they occur.

    ride safe & smart everyone!

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